best way of backing up

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Don, Sep 11, 2004.

  1. Don

    Don Guest

    Folks,

    I have about 12 gig of jpeg images arranged in a variety of directories. I
    have a number of image management programs including elements 2, ACDSee 6
    and the normal windows xp tools etc. I have a DVD burner and Nero software
    as well. I am looking to see if I am better of using something like the
    database back up facility of ACDsee or am I better off just copying the
    directories to a DVD. I need to do this for safety and will keep a set of
    disks of site. I also add new photos to the existing directories as I go so
    would need to consider some form of incremental back up or copy. Any
    suggestions would be welcome. I also would like to know if the ACDSee back
    up of the database actually copies the images separately or does it make one
    huge file that needs to be "restored" by ACDSee for access as opposed to
    viewing the files with any image viewer.
    regards


    Don From Down Under
    Don, Sep 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. Don

    Mark M Guest

    "Don" <> wrote in message
    news:1fx0d.26546$...
    > Folks,
    >
    > I have about 12 gig of jpeg images arranged in a variety of directories.

    I
    > have a number of image management programs including elements 2, ACDSee 6
    > and the normal windows xp tools etc. I have a DVD burner and Nero

    software
    > as well. I am looking to see if I am better of using something like the
    > database back up facility of ACDsee or am I better off just copying the
    > directories to a DVD. I need to do this for safety and will keep a set of
    > disks of site. I also add new photos to the existing directories as I go

    so
    > would need to consider some form of incremental back up or copy. Any
    > suggestions would be welcome. I also would like to know if the ACDSee

    back
    > up of the database actually copies the images separately or does it make

    one
    > huge file that needs to be "restored" by ACDSee for access as opposed to
    > viewing the files with any image viewer.
    > regards


    The ACDSee database doesn't contain ANY full images.
    "Backing up the ACDSee database" doesn't do anything related to what you
    describe as your needs for backing up your image files.
    Mark M, Sep 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. Don

    ferret Guest

    ferret, Sep 11, 2004
    #3
  4. Don

    Gadgets Guest

    Maybe something like Retrospect Backup, using either a multisession disc
    burn, or maybe to a seperate internal HD or external HD?

    Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com
    Gadgets, Sep 11, 2004
    #4
  5. Don

    larrylook Guest

    I bought a usb2 external hard drive. I've come up with creative ways of
    naming and backing up my "my pictures" folder, and folders in that folder.
    It is fast backup. I bring it back and forth between several computers. I
    can bring it to a new machine or a neighbors machine. IMHO this is the way
    to go. I recommend it very strongly. I wouldn't go back to another method.
    I'd be curious to hear from others why they think other methods are
    superior.

    "Don" <> wrote in message
    news:1fx0d.26546$...
    > Folks,
    >
    > I have about 12 gig of jpeg images arranged in a variety of directories.

    I
    > have a number of image management programs including elements 2, ACDSee 6
    > and the normal windows xp tools etc. I have a DVD burner and Nero

    software
    > as well. I am looking to see if I am better of using something like the
    > database back up facility of ACDsee or am I better off just copying the
    > directories to a DVD. I need to do this for safety and will keep a set of
    > disks of site. I also add new photos to the existing directories as I go

    so
    > would need to consider some form of incremental back up or copy. Any
    > suggestions would be welcome. I also would like to know if the ACDSee

    back
    > up of the database actually copies the images separately or does it make

    one
    > huge file that needs to be "restored" by ACDSee for access as opposed to
    > viewing the files with any image viewer.
    > regards
    >
    >
    > Don From Down Under
    >
    >
    larrylook, Sep 11, 2004
    #5
  6. "Don" <> wrote in message
    news:1fx0d.26546$...
    > I have about 12 gig of jpeg images arranged in a variety of directories.

    I
    > have a number of image management programs including elements 2, ACDSee 6
    > and the normal windows xp tools etc. I have a DVD burner and Nero

    software
    > as well. I am looking to see if I am better of using something like the
    > database back up facility of ACDsee or am I better off just copying the
    > directories to a DVD.


    I have first-hand experience of some CD-Rs that were only about 4 years old
    being largely unreadable. The second copy I made was made in the same way
    and had suffered the same deterioration, though different files were
    unreadable. OK, they were cheap CDs and were probably written at the
    highest speed possible, but it was a valuable warning. For anything long
    term, use good quality media and write at the slowest speed available.

    I have just bought some Fuji PhotoDisc CD-Rs which claim to have an
    "Ultra-Violet Shield" and to be "ten times more stable than normal". The
    discs look black instead of the usual metallic, for whatever that is worth.
    Not as cheap as most CD-Rs but worth it if the data lasts longer. I can't
    find any mention of a DVD version of this.
    http://www.fujifilm.co.uk/recmedia/index.html?audio/products/cdr-imaging.html~content
    Other manufacturers may do something similar.

    I was able to recover the essential parts of the data mentioned above by
    going back to one of the PCs I had been using. The hard disc was still
    intact and I never delete anything if I don't have to! Hard discs are one
    of the cheapest forms of storage and also appear to be one of the most
    reliable, given sensible handling. You might consider using a USB hard
    drive for your archive, or even two USB drives for some additional safety.

    A RAID system should be considered if the photographs represent a commercial
    product rather than just sentimental value. For more information on RAID
    than most people will ever need, look at
    http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Redundant array of independent disks
    or http://sbc.webopedia.com/TERM/R/RAID.html
    RAID 0 - spreading out blocks of each file across multiple disk drives but
    with no redundancy.
    RAID 1 - an exact copy (or mirror) of all of data on two or more disks.
    RAID 0+1 - two RAID 0 stripes are created, and a RAID 1 mirror is created
    over them.
    RAID 5 - uses block-level striping with parity data distributed across all
    member disks.

    Many motherboards these days support the simpler RAID level like 0, 1, and
    0+1. A better solution for a business would be RAID 5, which usually
    requires an additional disc controller card. This could add a couple of
    hundred $ on top of the cost of buying four hard drives. I'd still feel
    happier using CD backups every now and again even if it meant feeding large
    numbers of discs to the PC. Tape backup systems are cheap per gigabyte, but
    the lifetime of data on a tape is abysmally short.

    Also, consider off-site storage in case of something catastrophic like the
    building burning down or the PC being stolen.

    --
    Joe

    http://joe.hotchkiss.com
    Joe Hotchkiss, Sep 11, 2004
    #6
  7. Don

    bob Guest

    "Don" <> wrote in news:1fx0d.26546$D7.4792@news-
    server.bigpond.net.au:

    > I also add new photos to the existing directories as I go so
    > would need to consid


    I think you need real backup software. You can download a trial of
    Retrospect from www.dantz.com

    I've been using Retrospect for a long time and it works well.

    If you don't want to spend the money, the best thing might be to back it
    up now by hand, and then in the future backing up the new photos as you
    take them.

    --
    Delete the inverse SPAM to reply
    bob, Sep 11, 2004
    #7
  8. On 9/11/04 1:50 AM, in article
    1fx0d.26546$, "Don"
    <> wrote:

    > Folks,
    >
    > I have about 12 gig of jpeg images arranged in a variety of directories. I
    > have a number of image management programs including elements 2, ACDSee 6
    > and the normal windows xp tools etc. I have a DVD burner and Nero software
    > as well. I am looking to see if I am better of using something like the
    > database back up facility of ACDsee or am I better off just copying the
    > directories to a DVD. I need to do this for safety and will keep a set of
    > disks of site. I also add new photos to the existing directories as I go so
    > would need to consider some form of incremental back up or copy. Any
    > suggestions would be welcome. I also would like to know if the ACDSee back
    > up of the database actually copies the images separately or does it make one
    > huge file that needs to be "restored" by ACDSee for access as opposed to
    > viewing the files with any image viewer.
    > regards
    >
    >
    > Don From Down Under
    >
    >

    Have you ever considered buying an external firewire drive (like a LaCie
    250mb), and use backup software that comes with it to do your backups for
    it. I use one on my G5 mac and it does perfect incrementals night after
    night. Of course I use it to back up my user directory which catches
    everything.

    Harry
    Harry Flaxman, Sep 11, 2004
    #8
  9. Don

    Jim Townsend Guest

    Don wrote:

    > Folks,
    >
    > I have about 12 gig of jpeg images arranged in a variety of directories. I
    > have a number of image management programs including elements 2, ACDSee 6
    > and the normal windows xp tools etc. I have a DVD burner and Nero software
    > as well. I am looking to see if I am better of using something like the
    > database back up facility of ACDsee or am I better off just copying the
    > directories to a DVD.


    FWIW, I'm in about the same situation.

    I have a DVD burner and just do a straight directory copy to
    rewriteable DVDs. The DVDs are completely rewritten each backup.

    After a year they get tossed and replaced with fresh DVDs to avoid
    problems with failure from too many rewrites.

    It takes more than one disk so I 'balance' things by putting certain
    directories on each disk. I choose the directories by size. That way
    the disks are evenly filled.

    I keep a table of contents on each CD cover so I know which
    directories to copy to that disk when I do the backup.

    I have two sets of disks. I use set 'A' one week then set 'B' next
    week. I usually back up each Sunday (or close to it :), but if I
    take a lot of pictures, or have some important shots, then I'll back
    up that day after transferring them from the camera.
    Jim Townsend, Sep 11, 2004
    #9
  10. Don

    wayne Guest

    if you are running XP you may want to try using the backup utility is uses
    some compression which may or may not help with jpeg files but worth a try.
    If you copy files back from a DVD depending how you copy they may all wind
    up read only. You can backup to any location then burn the file or format
    the DVD and backup to it.

    backup and restore retain the permissions

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;320820&Product=winxp


    Wayne


    "Jim Townsend" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Don wrote:
    >
    >> Folks,
    >>
    >> I have about 12 gig of jpeg images arranged in a variety of directories.
    >> I
    >> have a number of image management programs including elements 2, ACDSee 6
    >> and the normal windows xp tools etc. I have a DVD burner and Nero
    >> software
    >> as well. I am looking to see if I am better of using something like the
    >> database back up facility of ACDsee or am I better off just copying the
    >> directories to a DVD.

    >
    > FWIW, I'm in about the same situation.
    >
    > I have a DVD burner and just do a straight directory copy to
    > rewriteable DVDs. The DVDs are completely rewritten each backup.
    >
    > After a year they get tossed and replaced with fresh DVDs to avoid
    > problems with failure from too many rewrites.
    >
    > It takes more than one disk so I 'balance' things by putting certain
    > directories on each disk. I choose the directories by size. That way
    > the disks are evenly filled.
    >
    > I keep a table of contents on each CD cover so I know which
    > directories to copy to that disk when I do the backup.
    >
    > I have two sets of disks. I use set 'A' one week then set 'B' next
    > week. I usually back up each Sunday (or close to it :), but if I
    > take a lot of pictures, or have some important shots, then I'll back
    > up that day after transferring them from the camera.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    wayne, Sep 11, 2004
    #10
  11. Don

    Jim Townsend Guest

    wayne wrote:

    > if you are running XP you may want to try using the backup utility is uses
    > some compression which may or may not help with jpeg files but worth a try.


    I use Linux, but I have tried it under XP.. JPEGs don't compress. With
    compression on, the backup set is usually a bit bigger than sum of the
    files :)

    > If you copy files back from a DVD depending how you copy they may all wind
    > up read only. You can backup to any location then burn the file or format
    > the DVD and backup to it.


    Actually I can't see anything wrong with having the photos read only. It
    prevents accidentally writing over them.
    Jim Townsend, Sep 12, 2004
    #11
  12. Don

    Don Guest

    Folks

    thanks for all your input. Not certain which way I will go for now. I do
    have an additional hard drive and simply copy one to the other but that is
    in the same box and is there just in case the drive crashes. Its the "fire"
    scenario that is the main reason for burning to a DVD. This means I can
    have a copy of site. Will down load a couple of back up utilities and try
    them as suggested by one poster. The issue of DVD media becoming unstable
    is a bit of a worry. Does anyone have any good sites where I could read up
    on that issue?

    Once again thanks for the input.

    regards

    Don from Down Under


    "Jim Townsend" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > wayne wrote:
    >
    > > if you are running XP you may want to try using the backup utility is

    uses
    > > some compression which may or may not help with jpeg files but worth a

    try.
    >
    > I use Linux, but I have tried it under XP.. JPEGs don't compress. With
    > compression on, the backup set is usually a bit bigger than sum of the
    > files :)
    >
    > > If you copy files back from a DVD depending how you copy they may all

    wind
    > > up read only. You can backup to any location then burn the file or

    format
    > > the DVD and backup to it.

    >
    > Actually I can't see anything wrong with having the photos read only. It
    > prevents accidentally writing over them.
    >
    >
    Don, Sep 12, 2004
    #12
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