Best method for home network and admin?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by me@privacy.net, Apr 11, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Lets say you have a scenario where you are the family
    IT person.

    There are two teenage boys in the house that use their
    computer for typical stuff..... downloading music, IM,
    etc... and you KNOW their PC is full of crap, adaware,
    etc.

    You want to create a home network such that the
    "management:" of all computers is as easy as possible.
    Don't want to spend a lot of time installing app's,
    fixing adaware and virus problems, etc. Yet you still
    want everyone to be able to use their PC's to get work
    done such as homework, etc.

    Would a thin client setup in a home situation make
    sense? That way you have only ONR install of Office to
    administer, only one install of other app's, etc?

    Would be a variety of stand alone stations... maybe one
    wireless for laptops or Pocket PC
     
    , Apr 11, 2007
    #1
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  2. Meat Plow Guest

    On Wed, 11 Apr 2007 14:37:49 -0500, me wrote:

    > Lets say you have a scenario where you are the family
    > IT person.
    >
    > There are two teenage boys in the house that use their
    > computer for typical stuff..... downloading music, IM,
    > etc... and you KNOW their PC is full of crap, adaware,
    > etc.
    >
    > You want to create a home network such that the
    > "management:" of all computers is as easy as possible.
    > Don't want to spend a lot of time installing app's,
    > fixing adaware and virus problems, etc. Yet you still
    > want everyone to be able to use their PC's to get work
    > done such as homework, etc.
    >
    > Would a thin client setup in a home situation make
    > sense? That way you have only ONR install of Office to
    > administer, only one install of other app's, etc?
    >
    > Would be a variety of stand alone stations... maybe one
    > wireless for laptops or Pocket PC


    Thin client as in remote desktop? You could use Real VNC for that but
    depending what is running on your network and what apps are running it
    would be too slow for me. You could give it a try since it's a free
    download.

    --
    #1 Offishul Ruiner of Usenet, March 2007
    #1 Usenet Asshole, March 2007
    #1 Bartlo Pset, March 13-24 2007
    #10 Most hated Usenetizen of all time
    Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004
    COOSN-266-06-25794
     
    Meat Plow, Apr 11, 2007
    #2
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  3. Whiskers Guest

    On 2007-04-11, <> wrote:
    > Lets say you have a scenario where you are the family
    > IT person.
    >
    > There are two teenage boys in the house that use their
    > computer for typical stuff..... downloading music, IM,
    > etc... and you KNOW their PC is full of crap, adaware,
    > etc.
    >
    > You want to create a home network such that the
    > "management:" of all computers is as easy as possible.
    > Don't want to spend a lot of time installing app's,
    > fixing adaware and virus problems, etc. Yet you still
    > want everyone to be able to use their PC's to get work
    > done such as homework, etc.
    >
    > Would a thin client setup in a home situation make
    > sense? That way you have only ONR install of Office to
    > administer, only one install of other app's, etc?
    >
    > Would be a variety of stand alone stations... maybe one
    > wireless for laptops or Pocket PC


    A wireless router with good built-in firewall etc security features would
    go a long way to help - just don't let the kids know the admin password
    for the router! Set up the router to use OpenDNS as its DNS server (see
    <http://www.opendns.com/>; that service helps to protect against known
    'phishing' and such sites).

    Unless you want to start a steep learning curve, don't try to set up
    multi-user applications on a central server - and if you do, I recommend
    that you start off by becoming familiar with Unix or Linux. (I recommend
    that anyway, in fact).

    A 'thin client' arrangement usually means that the users don't have 'real'
    computers at all, just terminals and keyboards using the main 'server' to
    do all the work. I don't think the kids would go for that, even if the
    parent were willing and able to set up such a thing and keep it running.

    Make sure that you keep your own computer secure and up-to-date, and tell
    the kids that you'll help them check and secure their own computers once,
    but after that it's their problem. Or let them help you with yours, and
    try to remember what they teach you ... <G>

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Apr 11, 2007
    #3
  4. wrote:

    > Lets say you have a scenario where you are the family
    > IT person.
    >
    > There are two teenage boys in the house that use their
    > computer for typical stuff..... downloading music, IM,
    > etc... and you KNOW their PC is full of crap, adaware,
    > etc.
    >

    Boys may become good linux guys :)
    Since most homework can be done with openoffice and friends (set it to save
    docs and xls by default) there is a good reason to let them start from
    ubuntu/pclinuxos livecds and save their homework on your server or maybe
    usb sticks. They can keep their windows for playing around, until they have
    stuffed it up so much that they finally decide to install their livecds
    over it :)

    > You want to create a home network such that the
    > "management:" of all computers is as easy as possible.


    Just set up a transparent proxy. Maybe privoxy or squidguard, if you use
    linux for that purpose.

    > Would a thin client setup in a home situation make
    > sense? That way you have only ONR install of Office to
    > administer, only one install of other app's, etc?
    >

    Nay. Their gamez won't run on that setup.

    --
    vista policy violation: Microsoft optical mouse found penguin patterns
    on mousepad. Partition scan in progress to remove offending
    incompatible products. Reactivate MS software.
    Linux 2.6.17mm,Xorg7.2/nvidia [LinuxCounter#295241,ICQ#4918962]
     
    Walter Mautner, Apr 12, 2007
    #4
  5. Guest

    Whiskers <> wrote:

    >A wireless router with good built-in firewall etc security features would
    >go a long way to help - just don't let the kids know the admin password
    >for the router! Set up the router to use OpenDNS as its DNS server (see
    ><http://www.opendns.com/>; that service helps to protect against known
    >'phishing' and such sites).


    Cool! Thanks!

    >Unless you want to start a steep learning curve, don't try to set up
    >multi-user applications on a central server - and if you do, I recommend
    >that you start off by becoming familiar with Unix or Linux. (I recommend
    >that anyway, in fact).
    >
    >A 'thin client' arrangement usually means that the users don't have 'real'
    >computers at all, just terminals and keyboards using the main 'server' to
    >do all the work. I don't think the kids would go for that, even if the
    >parent were willing and able to set up such a thing and keep it running.


    Understand. Just trying to figure out a way that the
    kids computer can NOT be munged up such that I have to
    spend any time re-installing the OS, reinstalling
    corrupted apps, etc. Hence the Citrix idea
     
    , Apr 13, 2007
    #5
  6. Whiskers Guest

    On 2007-04-13, <> wrote:
    > Whiskers <> wrote:
    >
    >>A wireless router with good built-in firewall etc security features would
    >>go a long way to help - just don't let the kids know the admin password
    >>for the router! Set up the router to use OpenDNS as its DNS server (see
    >><http://www.opendns.com/>; that service helps to protect against known
    >>'phishing' and such sites).

    >
    > Cool! Thanks!
    >
    >>Unless you want to start a steep learning curve, don't try to set up
    >>multi-user applications on a central server - and if you do, I recommend
    >>that you start off by becoming familiar with Unix or Linux. (I recommend
    >>that anyway, in fact).
    >>
    >>A 'thin client' arrangement usually means that the users don't have 'real'
    >>computers at all, just terminals and keyboards using the main 'server' to
    >>do all the work. I don't think the kids would go for that, even if the
    >>parent were willing and able to set up such a thing and keep it running.

    >
    > Understand. Just trying to figure out a way that the
    > kids computer can NOT be munged up such that I have to
    > spend any time re-installing the OS, reinstalling
    > corrupted apps, etc. Hence the Citrix idea


    If you're willing to spend that sort of money then why are you asking
    here? <G>

    You might be interested in 'kiosk computers'; try a web search. Or remove
    the hard disc from the kid's computer and give them a 'live CD' system
    (another web search for you) instead; that way, they have no writeable
    media to get mucked up and each time the computer starts you get a
    pristine system. That might be a little extreme for the kids to tolerate,
    if they're old enough to understand. You could do that but leave them a
    hard disc for storing 'stuff' on; the operating system on a CD would still
    be pretty fool-proof.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Apr 13, 2007
    #6
  7. wrote:

    > Lets say you have a scenario where you are the family
    > IT person.
    >
    > There are two teenage boys in the house that use their
    > computer for typical stuff..... downloading music, IM,
    > etc... and you KNOW their PC is full of crap, adaware,
    > etc.
    >

    Boys may become good linux guys :)
    Since most homework can be done with openoffice and friends (set it to save
    docs and xls by default) there is a good reason to let them start from
    ubuntu/pclinuxos livecds and save their homework on your server or maybe
    usb sticks. They can keep their windows for playing around, until they have
    stuffed it up so much that they finally decide to install their livecds
    over it :)

    > You want to create a home network such that the
    > "management:" of all computers is as easy as possible.


    Just set up a transparent proxy. Maybe privoxy or squidguard, if you use
    linux for that purpose.

    > Would a thin client setup in a home situation make
    > sense? That way you have only ONR install of Office to
    > administer, only one install of other app's, etc?
    >

    Nay. Their gamez won't run on that setup.

    --
    vista policy violation: Microsoft optical mouse found penguin patterns
    on mousepad. Partition scan in progress to remove offending
    incompatible products. Reactivate MS software.
    Linux 2.6.17mm,Xorg7.2/nvidia [LinuxCounter#295241,ICQ#4918962]
     
    Walter Mautner, Apr 14, 2007
    #7
  8. Glass Guest

    how about after a clean install of windows/apps/games taking a ghost
    image that you can ghost thier system with every other month.

    Remembering to take a backup of thier mp3s/saved games before you
    ghost.
     
    Glass, May 3, 2007
    #8
  9. Guest

    Glass <> wrote:

    >how about after a clean install of windows/apps/games taking a ghost
    >image that you can ghost thier system with every other month.
    >
    >Remembering to take a backup of thier mp3s/saved games before you
    >ghost.


    yeah that would work!
     
    , May 3, 2007
    #9
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