Best method For CD destruction

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by dr@him.com, Mar 7, 2007.

  1. Guest

    I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    In other words - nothing left for any bit-reader to work on.

    This is a one off job so buying special machinery isn't an option.
    The security of the data is such that outsourcing is not possible.

    I've had a few ideas such as simply burning (not top of list as no proof
    of destruction remains)

    or surface planing (hand drill maybe with sanding attachment) - would
    work but tiring on the arms.

    or my best idea yet is a plastic dustbin full of some sort of weak acid
    just strong enough to totally eat the data layer then wash the discs off
    as proof. (Ideas for solvent/acid are welcome - is vinegar strong
    enough?)

    I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    thought it an interesting enough problem.
    , Mar 7, 2007
    #1
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  2. Wayne. Guest

    wrote:
    > I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    > Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    > In other words - nothing left for any bit-reader to work on.
    >
    > This is a one off job so buying special machinery isn't an option.
    > The security of the data is such that outsourcing is not possible.
    >
    > I've had a few ideas such as simply burning (not top of list as no proof
    > of destruction remains)
    >
    > or surface planing (hand drill maybe with sanding attachment) - would
    > work but tiring on the arms.
    >
    > or my best idea yet is a plastic dustbin full of some sort of weak acid
    > just strong enough to totally eat the data layer then wash the discs off
    > as proof. (Ideas for solvent/acid are welcome - is vinegar strong
    > enough?)
    >
    > I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    > thought it an interesting enough problem.


    A microwave oven may do the trick. It fragments the reflective layer,
    and reacts with the dye.
    Wayne., Mar 7, 2007
    #2
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  3. Guest

    In article <45ee92a9$0$31054$5a62ac22@per-qv1-newsreader-
    01.iinet.net.au>, says...
    > wrote:
    > > I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    > > Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    > > In other words - nothing left for any bit-reader to work on.
    > >
    > > This is a one off job so buying special machinery isn't an option.
    > > The security of the data is such that outsourcing is not possible.
    > >
    > > I've had a few ideas such as simply burning (not top of list as no proof
    > > of destruction remains)
    > >
    > > or surface planing (hand drill maybe with sanding attachment) - would
    > > work but tiring on the arms.
    > >
    > > or my best idea yet is a plastic dustbin full of some sort of weak acid
    > > just strong enough to totally eat the data layer then wash the discs off
    > > as proof. (Ideas for solvent/acid are welcome - is vinegar strong
    > > enough?)
    > >
    > > I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    > > thought it an interesting enough problem.

    >
    > A microwave oven may do the trick. It fragments the reflective layer,
    > and reacts with the dye.
    >


    But would destroy the microwave and perhaps set fire to the discs.
    I don't think using a microwave is a very good idea at all ever.
    , Mar 7, 2007
    #3
  4. Sharky Guest

    wrote:

    >I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    >In other words - nothing left for any bit-reader to work on.


    You could shred them

    http://www.periphman.com/cd-shredder/per600.shtml

    and if that's not enough, you can burn the remains.
    Sharky, Mar 7, 2007
    #4
  5. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    > Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    > In other words - nothing left for any bit-reader to work on.
    >
    > This is a one off job so buying special machinery isn't an option.
    > The security of the data is such that outsourcing is not possible.
    >
    > I've had a few ideas such as simply burning (not top of list as no proof
    > of destruction remains)
    >
    > or surface planing (hand drill maybe with sanding attachment) - would
    > work but tiring on the arms.
    >
    > or my best idea yet is a plastic dustbin full of some sort of weak acid
    > just strong enough to totally eat the data layer then wash the discs off
    > as proof. (Ideas for solvent/acid are welcome - is vinegar strong
    > enough?)
    >


    Send them to my son - they're history!

    Senior's Guide to Computers
    http://www.seniorsguidetocomputers.com


    > I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    > thought it an interesting enough problem.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Seniors Guide to Computers, Mar 7, 2007
    #5
  6. Unruh Guest

    "Wayne." <> writes:

    > wrote:
    >> I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >> Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    >> In other words - nothing left for any bit-reader to work on.
    >>
    >> This is a one off job so buying special machinery isn't an option.
    >> The security of the data is such that outsourcing is not possible.
    >>
    >> I've had a few ideas such as simply burning (not top of list as no proof
    >> of destruction remains)
    >>
    >> or surface planing (hand drill maybe with sanding attachment) - would
    >> work but tiring on the arms.
    >>
    >> or my best idea yet is a plastic dustbin full of some sort of weak acid
    >> just strong enough to totally eat the data layer then wash the discs off
    >> as proof. (Ideas for solvent/acid are welcome - is vinegar strong
    >> enough?)
    >>
    >> I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    >> thought it an interesting enough problem.


    >A microwave oven may do the trick. It fragments the reflective layer,
    >and reacts with the dye.

    a) that is special equipment. and b you will probably burn out the
    microwave oven long before you finish.
    b) I am a bit dubious about the acid bit.
    d) fire, except for the release of all that toxic smoke. Similarly sanding
    would release a fine dust with unknown hazards in it. Is your life worth
    the destruction of this data?
    There do exist shredders which can handle CDs. 12000 of them sounds like a
    bit much.
    Unruh, Mar 7, 2007
    #6
  7. Moe Trin Guest

    On Wed, 07 Mar 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.computer.security, in article
    <>, wrote:

    >I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    >In other words - nothing left for any bit-reader to work on.


    I'm assuming individually created CDs - is the destruction requirement
    official (some government agency), corporate policy, or personal? If
    bit-reading is a concern - a _very_ expensive procedure, given the bit
    density (average about 50000 per linear inch, with a track density of
    roughly 16000 TPI) then the only solution is the total destruction of
    the media.

    >This is a one off job so buying special machinery isn't an option.
    >The security of the data is such that outsourcing is not possible.
    >
    >I've had a few ideas such as simply burning (not top of list as no proof
    >of destruction remains)


    1. If this is an official government requirement, contact the government
    security officer, and do EXACTLY what they tell you to do. No exceptions.

    2. If this is a corporate requirement, contact a commercial data
    destruction service. They have the necessary hardware and experience,
    and have (or can get) the appropriate permits. Burning, or dissolving the
    media is normally a witnessed procedure, whether official or a company
    destruction scheme. If you insist on doing this internally, then hit
    goggle and get a copy of the (US) DoD 5220.22-M National Industrial
    Security Program Operating Manual(NISPOM) for recommended procedures.

    3. If this is a private or personal requirement, you have to make a
    realistic decision of who is going to be interested in those bits, and
    how much time and effort they are going to be willing to put into the
    task of recovering the data. Normally, feeding the CDs to am industrial
    grade paper shredder (not a cheap one - read the manual) twice is adequate,
    especially if you then stir the chunks. Do you want to do that 'jig-saw'
    puzzle? (Assuming 5 x 5 mm pieces, you've got a five million piece puzzle.)
    If these are CD-RAW disks, another alternative is to heat the disks to a
    high temperature (a very minimum of 200C, with 500 to 700C being even
    better) but watch the fire hazard.

    Note that burning or dissolving may release toxic fumes, while the
    chemicals used to dissolve the media are not without hazard. But then,
    cutting, sanding, or similar isn't without danger either. Wear eye
    protection, and take other appropriate measures. Note also that burning
    and the disposal of chemicals may require government permits.

    >or surface planing (hand drill maybe with sanding attachment) - would
    >work but tiring on the arms.


    12000 pieces? You are going to be one very tired puppy. Hell, even feeding
    them into a cross-cut shredder is going to take a couple of days.

    >or my best idea yet is a plastic dustbin full of some sort of weak acid
    >just strong enough to totally eat the data layer then wash the discs off
    >as proof.


    Surely you jest.

    >(Ideas for solvent/acid are welcome - is vinegar strong enough?)


    No. Contact a commercial destruction firm.

    >I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    >thought it an interesting enough problem.


    ----
    from a post in alt.humor.best-of-usenet - original posting to 'uk.misc'

    > What's the best way of disposing of them in such a way that the hard
    > disks can never be used again, not even if they swap parts with 'donor'
    > hard disks?


    Post them to yourself via City Link to destroy them, and then post
    them again via Parcel Force for disposal.
    ----

    Good Luck!

    Old guy
    Moe Trin, Mar 7, 2007
    #7
  8. Rick Merrill Guest

    wrote:
    > I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    > Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.

    ....
    > I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    > thought it an interesting enough problem.
    >


    put them under a heat lamp until they curl up! They'll still
    pretty much fit together so that they can be counted!

    [Best bet is to shred 'em under the watch of a notary public
    who can seal a document proving they were destroyed.]
    Rick Merrill, Mar 7, 2007
    #8
  9. Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > wrote:
    > > I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    > > Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.

    > ...
    > > I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    > > thought it an interesting enough problem.
    > >



    Thank you all for your input.
    Appart from the fact that no one seems to have actually read the
    requirement and some of you seem paranoid or determined to go off
    on wild tangents invoving mysterious government agencies etc...

    Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless.
    Fire has already been ruled out as leaving no proof.
    Microwave is just plain stupid.
    Sanding will work fine for low volumes - dust isnt a problem
    except for the severely allergic - in which case someone else can do
    the job wearing a mask (What are you - 6 years old?)- but I have a large
    quantity.

    Signed notorisation merely guarantees a fraudulent interest - this is
    always something to be avoided - its a dumb practice all round.

    I suspect my original concept is clearly the best.
    i.e. mild acid soaking.

    That can leave a plastic disk for proof of quantity and blankness of
    each.

    Furthermore the principle can have control of the dustbin.

    Thank you all again.
    , Mar 8, 2007
    #9
  10. From: "Moe Trin" <>

    | On Wed, 07 Mar 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.computer.security, in article
    | <>, wrote:
    |
    >> I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >> Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    >> In other words - nothing left for any bit-reader to work on.

    |
    | I'm assuming individually created CDs - is the destruction requirement
    | official (some government agency), corporate policy, or personal? If
    | bit-reading is a concern - a _very_ expensive procedure, given the bit
    | density (average about 50000 per linear inch, with a track density of
    | roughly 16000 TPI) then the only solution is the total destruction of
    | the media.
    |
    >> This is a one off job so buying special machinery isn't an option.
    >> The security of the data is such that outsourcing is not possible.
    >>
    >> I've had a few ideas such as simply burning (not top of list as no proof
    >> of destruction remains)

    |
    | 1. If this is an official government requirement, contact the government
    | security officer, and do EXACTLY what they tell you to do. No exceptions.
    |
    | 2. If this is a corporate requirement, contact a commercial data
    | destruction service. They have the necessary hardware and experience,
    | and have (or can get) the appropriate permits. Burning, or dissolving the
    | media is normally a witnessed procedure, whether official or a company
    | destruction scheme. If you insist on doing this internally, then hit
    | goggle and get a copy of the (US) DoD 5220.22-M National Industrial
    | Security Program Operating Manual(NISPOM) for recommended procedures.
    |
    | 3. If this is a private or personal requirement, you have to make a
    | realistic decision of who is going to be interested in those bits, and
    | how much time and effort they are going to be willing to put into the
    | task of recovering the data. Normally, feeding the CDs to am industrial
    | grade paper shredder (not a cheap one - read the manual) twice is adequate,
    | especially if you then stir the chunks. Do you want to do that 'jig-saw'
    | puzzle? (Assuming 5 x 5 mm pieces, you've got a five million piece puzzle.)
    | If these are CD-RAW disks, another alternative is to heat the disks to a
    | high temperature (a very minimum of 200C, with 500 to 700C being even
    | better) but watch the fire hazard.
    |
    | Note that burning or dissolving may release toxic fumes, while the
    | chemicals used to dissolve the media are not without hazard. But then,
    | cutting, sanding, or similar isn't without danger either. Wear eye
    | protection, and take other appropriate measures. Note also that burning
    | and the disposal of chemicals may require government permits.
    |
    >> or surface planing (hand drill maybe with sanding attachment) - would
    >> work but tiring on the arms.

    |
    | 12000 pieces? You are going to be one very tired puppy. Hell, even feeding
    | them into a cross-cut shredder is going to take a couple of days.
    |
    >> or my best idea yet is a plastic dustbin full of some sort of weak acid
    >> just strong enough to totally eat the data layer then wash the discs off
    >> as proof.

    |
    | Surely you jest.
    |
    >> (Ideas for solvent/acid are welcome - is vinegar strong enough?)

    |
    | No. Contact a commercial destruction firm.
    |
    >> I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    >> thought it an interesting enough problem.

    |
    | ----
    | from a post in alt.humor.best-of-usenet - original posting to 'uk.misc'
    |
    >> What's the best way of disposing of them in such a way that the hard
    >> disks can never be used again, not even if they swap parts with 'donor'
    >> hard disks?

    |
    | Post them to yourself via City Link to destroy them, and then post
    | them again via Parcel Force for disposal.
    | ----
    |
    | Good Luck!
    |
    | Old guy

    As usual.... Excellent advice.

    --
    Dave
    http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    David H. Lipman, Mar 8, 2007
    #10
  11. Notan Guest

    wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > says...
    >> wrote:
    >>> I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >>> Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.

    >> ...
    >>> I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    >>> thought it an interesting enough problem.
    >>>

    >
    >
    > Thank you all for your input.
    > Appart from the fact that no one seems to have actually read the
    > requirement and some of you seem paranoid or determined to go off
    > on wild tangents invoving mysterious government agencies etc...
    >
    > Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless.


    <snip>

    Did I miss something?

    "Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless?"

    Have you ever seen a shredded CD?

    --
    Notan
    Notan, Mar 8, 2007
    #11
  12. Notan wrote:

    > wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> says...
    >>> wrote:
    >>>> I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >>>> Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    >>> ...
    >>>> I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    >>>> thought it an interesting enough problem.
    >>>>

    >>
    >> Thank you all for your input.
    >> Appart from the fact that no one seems to have actually read the
    >> requirement and some of you seem paranoid or determined to go off
    >> on wild tangents invoving mysterious government agencies etc...
    >>
    >> Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless.

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > Did I miss something?
    >
    > "Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless?"
    >
    > Have you ever seen a shredded CD?


    Since a CD has enough error correction information to even cover up for
    scratches of 1 mm in size, you really shouldn't wonder how someone can
    restore data from mildly scratched pieces of a CD.
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Mar 8, 2007
    #12
  13. Notan Guest

    Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    > Notan wrote:
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> says...
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>> I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >>>>> Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    >>>> ...
    >>>>> I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    >>>>> thought it an interesting enough problem.
    >>>>>
    >>> Thank you all for your input.
    >>> Appart from the fact that no one seems to have actually read the
    >>> requirement and some of you seem paranoid or determined to go off
    >>> on wild tangents invoving mysterious government agencies etc...
    >>>
    >>> Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless.

    >> <snip>
    >>
    >> Did I miss something?
    >>
    >> "Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless?"
    >>
    >> Have you ever seen a shredded CD?

    >
    > Since a CD has enough error correction information to even cover up for
    > scratches of 1 mm in size, you really shouldn't wonder how someone can
    > restore data from mildly scratched pieces of a CD.


    Mildly scratched, I understand.

    I'm talking about sending a CD through a shredder. And not just 1 CD,
    but, according to the OP, 12,000 CDs.

    Can you imagine someone sifting through the rubble, trying to reassemble
    even 1 complete CD!

    --
    Notan
    Notan, Mar 8, 2007
    #13
  14. JAB Guest

    Notan wrote:
    > Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >> Notan wrote:
    >>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>> In article <>,
    >>>> says...
    >>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>> I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >>>>>> Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    >>>>> ...
    >>>>>> I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as
    >>>>>> I thought it an interesting enough problem.
    >>>>>>
    >>>> Thank you all for your input.
    >>>> Appart from the fact that no one seems to have actually read the
    >>>> requirement and some of you seem paranoid or determined to go off on
    >>>> wild tangents invoving mysterious government agencies etc...
    >>>>
    >>>> Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless.
    >>> <snip>
    >>>
    >>> Did I miss something?
    >>>
    >>> "Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless?"
    >>>
    >>> Have you ever seen a shredded CD?

    >>
    >> Since a CD has enough error correction information to even cover up for
    >> scratches of 1 mm in size, you really shouldn't wonder how someone can
    >> restore data from mildly scratched pieces of a CD.

    >
    > Mildly scratched, I understand.
    >
    > I'm talking about sending a CD through a shredder. And not just 1 CD,
    > but, according to the OP, 12,000 CDs.
    >
    > Can you imagine someone sifting through the rubble, trying to reassemble
    > even 1 complete CD!
    >


    I think the bit you missed it that the OP really doesn't understand what
    he's talking about.

    "The security of the data is such that outsourcing is not possible." so
    what on earth is this data?

    "Weak acid ... as proof" ... well they look like CDs, oh and can you
    check each one after just to make sure that the data has truly been removed.

    Personally whoever gave the task to someone who a) doesn't know what
    he's doing and b) dismisses any ideas that isn't the one he's already
    chosen deserves all they get.
    JAB, Mar 8, 2007
    #14
  15. Vanguard Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > says...
    >> wrote:
    >> > I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.

    <snip>
    >> A microwave oven may do the trick. It fragments the reflective
    >> layer,
    >> and reacts with the dye.

    >
    > But would destroy the microwave and perhaps set fire to the discs.
    > I don't think using a microwave is a very good idea at all ever.



    For really old microwaves maybe, and only if you neglected to provide a
    "load" to absorb the radiation, like forgetting to add a glass of water.
    You don't need the extra load in newer microwaves. While the CDs get
    hot to the touch, I haven't seen them set the microwave oven afire;
    otherwise, how the hell could you cook any food in a microwave, either?
    When you nuked that TV dinner until it was char, did your microwave
    burst into flames?

    The problem with burning, whether with fire or radiation (microwave), is
    the odor. You will need to take the microwave outside and away from any
    areas where human gather due to the stink. With 12,000 CDs to nuke,
    there could even be EPA regulations against such disposal of plastic and
    the invisible effuse.
    Vanguard, Mar 8, 2007
    #15
  16. Notan wrote:

    > Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >> Notan wrote:
    >>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>> In article <>,
    >>>> says...
    >>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>> I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >>>>>> Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    >>>>> ...
    >>>>>> I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    >>>>>> thought it an interesting enough problem.
    >>>>>>
    >>>> Thank you all for your input.
    >>>> Appart from the fact that no one seems to have actually read the
    >>>> requirement and some of you seem paranoid or determined to go off
    >>>> on wild tangents invoving mysterious government agencies etc...
    >>>>
    >>>> Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless.
    >>> <snip>
    >>>
    >>> Did I miss something?
    >>>
    >>> "Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless?"
    >>>
    >>> Have you ever seen a shredded CD?

    >>
    >> Since a CD has enough error correction information to even cover up for
    >> scratches of 1 mm in size, you really shouldn't wonder how someone can
    >> restore data from mildly scratched pieces of a CD.

    >
    > Mildly scratched, I understand.


    Indeed, the single peaces left are usually only mildly scratched.

    > I'm talking about sending a CD through a shredder. And not just 1 CD,
    > but, according to the OP, 12,000 CDs.
    >
    > Can you imagine someone sifting through the rubble, trying to reassemble
    > even 1 complete CD!


    You said you understand but you obviously don't. We don't even care for
    reassembling the pieces, but only rather want to recover the data from each
    piece. Not caring for filesystem metadata or other stuff.
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Mar 8, 2007
    #16
  17. Notan Guest

    Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    > Notan wrote:
    >
    >> Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >>> Notan wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>> In article <>,
    >>>>> says...
    >>>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>> I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >>>>>>> Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.
    >>>>>> ...
    >>>>>>> I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    >>>>>>> thought it an interesting enough problem.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>> Thank you all for your input.
    >>>>> Appart from the fact that no one seems to have actually read the
    >>>>> requirement and some of you seem paranoid or determined to go off
    >>>>> on wild tangents invoving mysterious government agencies etc...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless.
    >>>> <snip>
    >>>>
    >>>> Did I miss something?
    >>>>
    >>>> "Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless?"
    >>>>
    >>>> Have you ever seen a shredded CD?
    >>> Since a CD has enough error correction information to even cover up for
    >>> scratches of 1 mm in size, you really shouldn't wonder how someone can
    >>> restore data from mildly scratched pieces of a CD.

    >> Mildly scratched, I understand.

    >
    > Indeed, the single peaces left are usually only mildly scratched.
    >
    >> I'm talking about sending a CD through a shredder. And not just 1 CD,
    >> but, according to the OP, 12,000 CDs.
    >>
    >> Can you imagine someone sifting through the rubble, trying to reassemble
    >> even 1 complete CD!

    >
    > You said you understand but you obviously don't. We don't even care for
    > reassembling the pieces, but only rather want to recover the data from each
    > piece. Not caring for filesystem metadata or other stuff.


    Huh?

    Have you ever seen an industrial shredder? Have you seen the resultant pieces?

    Maybe *you're* the one that doesn't understand.

    --
    Notan
    Notan, Mar 8, 2007
    #17
  18. Default User Guest

    On Thu, 08 Mar 2007 10:26:01 -0700, Notan <notan@ddressthatcanbespammed>
    wrote:

    >Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >> You said you understand but you obviously don't. We don't even care for
    >> reassembling the pieces, but only rather want to recover the data from each
    >> piece. Not caring for filesystem metadata or other stuff.

    >
    >Huh?
    >
    >Have you ever seen an industrial shredder? Have you seen the resultant pieces?
    >
    >Maybe *you're* the one that doesn't understand.


    No, Sebastian has it right in this case. You can get a lot of damaging
    information from the bits left over.
    Default User, Mar 8, 2007
    #18
  19. Unruh Guest

    writes:

    >In article <>,
    > says...
    >> wrote:
    >> > I need to destroy the data on 12,000 CD discs.
    >> > Destruction of data needs to be total and visibly complete.

    >> ...
    >> > I just thought I'd ask here in case anyone had any better ideas as I
    >> > thought it an interesting enough problem.
    >> >



    >Thank you all for your input.
    >Appart from the fact that no one seems to have actually read the
    >requirement and some of you seem paranoid or determined to go off
    >on wild tangents invoving mysterious government agencies etc...


    he question was why do you want to destroy this data. Is is a legal, a
    contractual, a private requirement.

    >Shredding leaves data and is totally worthless.


    YOu know nothing is all that sentence demonstrates.

    >Fire has already been ruled out as leaving no proof.


    The whole purpose of data destruction is to leave no proof. You acid
    etching is rediculous as a method of proof.


    >Microwave is just plain stupid.


    As is this post.

    >Sanding will work fine for low volumes - dust isnt a problem
    >except for the severely allergic - in which case someone else can do


    I am sorry, but you have studied the effects of the metals and chemicals
    released when sanding a CDRom? If not then your comments are simply stupid.

    >the job wearing a mask (What are you - 6 years old?)- but I have a large


    And you seem to be 2.

    >quantity.


    Is a mask going to keep out the chemicals? What is the skin toxicity of the
    chemicals released? Where are you going to do it, and how are you going to
    clean up the sanding dust?



    >Signed notorisation merely guarantees a fraudulent interest - this is
    >always something to be avoided - its a dumb practice all round.




    >I suspect my original concept is clearly the best.
    >i.e. mild acid soaking.


    Which in general will do nothing. The metal layer is protected by a layer
    which is probably acid resistant. Also the blank disks prove nothing since
    you could have gone out and bought 12000 blank disks and acid etched them.


    >That can leave a plastic disk for proof of quantity and blankness of
    >each.


    So what. YOu could have gone out and bought disks that you then acid
    etched. What kind of proof is that? Again, the whole point of destruction
    is to leave no proof.


    >Furthermore the principle can have control of the dustbin.


    He can do that for the shredded disks as well.


    >Thank you all again.
    Unruh, Mar 8, 2007
    #19
  20. Notan Guest

    Default User wrote:
    > On Thu, 08 Mar 2007 10:26:01 -0700, Notan <notan@ddressthatcanbespammed>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Sebastian Gottschalk wrote:
    >>> You said you understand but you obviously don't. We don't even care for
    >>> reassembling the pieces, but only rather want to recover the data from each
    >>> piece. Not caring for filesystem metadata or other stuff.

    >> Huh?
    >>
    >> Have you ever seen an industrial shredder? Have you seen the resultant pieces?
    >>
    >> Maybe *you're* the one that doesn't understand.

    >
    > No, Sebastian has it right in this case. You can get a lot of damaging
    > information from the bits left over.


    I've seen the results of industrially shredded CDs.

    (Not a paper shredder that you'd find in a home, but an *industrial* shredder.)

    The result is *tiny* pieces of CDs, many of which have delaminated.

    You're also talking about *totally* out-of-context bits of information.

    If this wasn't *enough*, you could always heat the pieces, reluting in a molten
    pile of non-recoverable data.

    --
    Notan
    Notan, Mar 8, 2007
    #20
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