Best macro lens for dragonflies

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Graham Archer, Aug 18, 2005.

  1. Hi, I have a Nikon D70 and I would like to take some pictures of dragonflies
    etc
    I need a lens that would take photos of insects from a distance with out
    disturbing them.
    Any suggestions please !
    Thanks !
     
    Graham Archer, Aug 18, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Graham Archer wrote:
    > Hi, I have a Nikon D70 and I would like to take some pictures of
    > dragonflies etc
    > I need a lens that would take photos of insects from a distance with
    > out disturbing them.
    > Any suggestions please !
    > Thanks !


    I believe they have a 200mm macro.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Aug 18, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Graham Archer

    Deedee Tee Guest

    On Thu, 18 Aug 2005 10:36:47 +0100, "Graham Archer"
    <2s.com> wrote:

    >Hi, I have a Nikon D70 and I would like to take some pictures of dragonflies
    >etc
    >I need a lens that would take photos of insects from a distance with out
    >disturbing them.
    >Any suggestions please !
    > Thanks !
    >


    From a distance = long FL. Think 180-200 mm, like the Micro Nikkor 200
    or the Sigma Apo Macro 180 or the Tamron Macro 180. Add a FL
    multiplier (2x) to get more working distance. Add a flash (ordinary,
    not ring flash), unless you always work in full sunlight.
     
    Deedee Tee, Aug 18, 2005
    #3
  4. "Graham Archer" <2s.com> wrote in message
    news:de1krm$pg4$2surf.net...
    > Hi, I have a Nikon D70 and I would like to take some pictures of
    > dragonflies etc
    > I need a lens that would take photos of insects from a distance with out
    > disturbing them.
    > Any suggestions please !
    > Thanks !



    I shot this http://www.pbase.com/rkircher/image/44998760 with my Canon EF
    100-400L IS hand held while look down and over a railing.

    It's neither a Macro nor Nikon but it might give you an idea what you can do
    even with a good zoom/telephoto lens.

    A couple more I've down with the same lens.
    http://www.pbase.com/rkircher/image/47580194
    http://www.pbase.com/rkircher/image/47691432

    BTW: The first two are not cropped. The last one was cropped to print out
    on 8x10.

    --

    Rob
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Aug 18, 2005
    #4
  5. Graham Archer

    grenner Guest

    I use a Tamron 180mm Macro with excellent results and a good working
    distance.

    Greg
    "Graham Archer" <2s.com> wrote in message
    news:de1krm$pg4$2surf.net...
    > Hi, I have a Nikon D70 and I would like to take some pictures of
    > dragonflies etc
    > I need a lens that would take photos of insects from a distance with out
    > disturbing them.
    > Any suggestions please !
    > Thanks !
    >
     
    grenner, Aug 18, 2005
    #5
  6. Graham Archer

    GTO Guest

    Yes. Get Nikon's Micro-Nikkor 105mm f2.8D AF. It works great and is
    rather inexpensive (less than US$600). It offers 1:1 and is fast and
    sharp.

    See the following handheld shot with flash bracket at 1/400 flash sync
    using an SB-800:

    http://www.pbase.com/overney/image/47282019.jpg

    Gregor
     
    GTO, Aug 18, 2005
    #6
  7. Graham Archer

    Guest

    Graham Archer wrote:

    > Hi, I have a Nikon D70 and I would like to take some pictures of dragonflies


    Even at 200mm, you will need a very co-operative dragonfly (unless you
    like chilling them -- or let nature do the chilling and you take
    pictures of them in the early morning.)

    Otherwise, get the Nikon equivalent of a 300/4 telephoto and a 2x
    converter: a reasonable setup (especially if it can close-focus like
    the Canon EF 300/4L IS). Flash advised.
     
    , Aug 18, 2005
    #7
  8. Graham Archer

    name Guest

    wrote:
    > Graham Archer wrote:
    >
    > > Hi, I have a Nikon D70 and I would like to take some pictures of dragonflies

    >
    > Even at 200mm, you will need a very co-operative dragonfly (unless you
    > like chilling them -- or let nature do the chilling and you take
    > pictures of them in the early morning.)


    Actually dragonflys can be pretty playful, sometimes I even get them to
    sit on my hand.

    >
    > Otherwise, get the Nikon equivalent of a 300/4 telephoto and a 2x
    > converter: a reasonable setup (especially if it can close-focus like
    > the Canon EF 300/4L IS). Flash advised.
     
    name, Aug 19, 2005
    #8
  9. Graham Archer

    wavelength Guest

    wrote:
    > Graham Archer wrote:
    >
    > > Hi, I have a Nikon D70 and I would like to take some pictures of dragonflies

    >
    > Even at 200mm, you will need a very co-operative dragonfly (unless you
    > like chilling them -- or let nature do the chilling and you take
    > pictures of them in the early morning.)
    >
    > Otherwise, get the Nikon equivalent of a 300/4 telephoto and a 2x
    > converter: a reasonable setup (especially if it can close-focus like
    > the Canon EF 300/4L IS). Flash advised.


    I agree,

    I shoot dragonflies (or try to) all the time with a 200mm IS lens, and
    it's pretty difficult to get the little buggers to stand still when you
    get within 10 feet (2 meters or so)

    Butterflies are even worse, and forget trying to get a grasshopper that
    you don't just happen upon.

    Get a 400, just go for the big guns.
     
    wavelength, Aug 19, 2005
    #9
  10. Graham Archer

    Guest

    Graham Archer wrote:
    > Hi, I have a Nikon D70 and I would like to take some pictures of dragonflies
    > etc
    > I need a lens that would take photos of insects from a distance with out
    > disturbing them.
    > Any suggestions please !
    > Thanks !


    Basically all of the photos in the following link were taken with a
    55mm Micro Nikkor circa 1983 reverse mounted to my D70s. When flash
    was used, it was the built-in D70 flash, nothing fancy. The lens is
    manual focus, but in macro this is not a bad thing at all. At any
    rate, I wouldn't really worry about "disturbing" the insects...they're
    used to it. Did I mention that this lens was $120 from B&H?

    http://www.pbase.com/sirchandestroy/insects

    Ben
     
    , Aug 19, 2005
    #10
  11. In message <>,
    wavelength <> writes
    >
    > wrote:
    >> Graham Archer wrote:
    >>
    >> > Hi, I have a Nikon D70 and I would like to take some pictures of
    >> >dragonflies

    >>
    >> Even at 200mm, you will need a very co-operative dragonfly (unless you
    >> like chilling them -- or let nature do the chilling and you take
    >> pictures of them in the early morning.)
    >>
    >> Otherwise, get the Nikon equivalent of a 300/4 telephoto and a 2x
    >> converter: a reasonable setup (especially if it can close-focus like
    >> the Canon EF 300/4L IS). Flash advised.

    >
    >I agree,
    >
    >I shoot dragonflies (or try to) all the time with a 200mm IS lens, and
    >it's pretty difficult to get the little buggers to stand still when you
    >get within 10 feet (2 meters or so)
    >
    >Butterflies are even worse, and forget trying to get a grasshopper that
    >you don't just happen upon.
    >
    >Get a 400, just go for the big guns.
    >

    I can see how such a big lens might make the difference between getting
    a shot or not, but the original poster specifically asked about a macro
    lens ie. he wants to capture detail. It is doubtful whether a big lens
    such as a 400 (I have a 400 IS myself) will focus close enough to
    capture the detail he is after. And if you want to stand a chance of
    capturing flight shots, you'd need to be real lucky to even get one in
    the viewfinder with a big lens. Birds have a fairly predictable flight
    path, dragonflies definitely do not.

    I'm on a Canon system, and whilst I'm not saying this is definitely the
    best lens for the job, I use a 100mm macro (150mm equivalent in 35mm
    terms). Image stabilisation would be a definite bonus though.

    I only bought the lens 2 months ago (mostly I'm a bird photographer).
    These are some of the shots I have taken with it.

    www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Emperor-in-flight.jpg
    www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Azure-damsels-mating.jpg
    www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Golden-ring.jpg

    .....and you'll need to maximise your browser window to see this one at
    its best.....

    www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Common-Darter-close-up.jpg

    --
    Paul Flackett
     
    Paul Flackett, Aug 22, 2005
    #11
  12. Paul Flackett wrote:

    > I'm on a Canon system, and whilst I'm not saying this is definitely
    > the best lens for the job, I use a 100mm macro (150mm equivalent in
    > 35mm terms). Image stabilisation would be a definite bonus though.
    >
    > I only bought the lens 2 months ago (mostly I'm a bird photographer).
    > These are some of the shots I have taken with it.
    >
    > www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Emperor-in-flight.jpg
    > www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Azure-damsels-mating.jpg
    > www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Golden-ring.jpg
    >
    > ....and you'll need to maximise your browser window to see this one at
    > its best.....
    >
    > www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Common-Darter-close-up.jpg


    Spectacular shots! What is the working distance with the 100mm for these
    shots? I use a Nikon Micro 105mm and have a hard time getting close enough
    to dragonflies without scaring them.



    Rita
     
    =?iso-8859-1?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=, Aug 22, 2005
    #12
  13. Graham Archer

    Guest

    , Aug 22, 2005
    #13
  14. In message <>, Rita Ä Berkowitz
    <> writes
    >Paul Flackett wrote:
    >
    >> I'm on a Canon system, and whilst I'm not saying this is definitely
    >> the best lens for the job, I use a 100mm macro (150mm equivalent in
    >> 35mm terms). Image stabilisation would be a definite bonus though.
    >>
    >> I only bought the lens 2 months ago (mostly I'm a bird photographer).
    >> These are some of the shots I have taken with it.
    >>
    >> www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Emperor-in-flight.jpg
    >> www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Azure-damsels-mating.jpg
    >> www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Golden-ring.jpg
    >>
    >> ....and you'll need to maximise your browser window to see this one at
    >> its best.....
    >>
    >> www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Common-Darter-close-up.jpg

    >
    >Spectacular shots! What is the working distance with the 100mm for these
    >shots? I use a Nikon Micro 105mm and have a hard time getting close enough
    >to dragonflies without scaring them.
    >

    Thanks. It focuses down to about 15cm but most of these shots were
    further away than that, although the Common Darter was pretty close. The
    flight shot was over a metre away, maybe even two, so it's a fairly
    lo-res shot unfortunately. However it's a good advertisement for digital
    as I'd have run out of film long before I got this one!

    They're not the easiest of subjects - you just need a lot of patience.
    Generally easier than birds though as you often get several tries and
    some will allow you to approach very close. Wearing drab clothes
    definitely helps, as does watching your position relative to the sun.
    The Golden Ringed Dragonfly however was happy to crawl onto my hand
    after I had taken the shot. I think it was in some sort of post-coital
    stupor (lying back and smoking a cigarette?) - you can see the mating
    debris at the end of its abdomen.

    Apologies to other posters. I incorrectly stated that the original
    poster had specified macro. I don't know where I got that from. Doh!

    --
    Paul Flackett
     
    Paul Flackett, Aug 22, 2005
    #14
  15. Graham Archer

    Deedee Tee Guest

    On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 23:03:32 +0100, Paul Flackett
    <> wrote:

    >Apologies to other posters. I incorrectly stated that the original
    >poster had specified macro. I don't know where I got that from. Doh!


    Well, the thread header does say "Best macro lens for dragonflies", so
    you were right the first time.

    Talking about big guns, Sigma used to make a 300 mm macro (with
    closest focusing yielding 1:3 if I remember correctly). The longest
    true macros (1:1) I am aware of are 200mm and 180 mm. There was also a
    Sigma 600 f/8 catadioptric focusing down to 1:3 at 2 m (I have one),
    but focusing is too difficult for mobile subjects, and DOF is a bit
    too small to be usable for macro in practice.
     
    Deedee Tee, Aug 23, 2005
    #15
  16. Graham Archer

    Mike Guest

    "Deedee Tee" <abuse@localhost> a écrit dans le message de news:
    ...
    > On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 23:03:32 +0100, Paul Flackett
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Talking about big guns, Sigma used to make a 300 mm macro (with
    > closest focusing yielding 1:3 if I remember correctly).



    Don't you mean Sigma 70-300 mm macro, yielding 1:2 ?
    http://dhost.info/photocanon/sigma/index.htm?size=1&exif=&page=all


    at least 3 variations existed, the best beeing "APO" (not of much importance
    with an APS sized frame).

    Mike
     
    Mike, Aug 23, 2005
    #16
  17. In message <>, Deedee Tee
    <abuse@localhost.?.invalid> writes
    >On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 23:03:32 +0100, Paul Flackett
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>Apologies to other posters. I incorrectly stated that the original
    >>poster had specified macro. I don't know where I got that from. Doh!

    >
    >Well, the thread header does say "Best macro lens for dragonflies", so
    >you were right the first time.
    >

    Oh yes ..... ahem ..... the senior moments are now starting to outnumber
    the non-senior ones :)
    --
    Paul Flackett
     
    Paul Flackett, Aug 23, 2005
    #17
  18. In article <>, Paul Flackett
    <> writes
    >>

    >I can see how such a big lens might make the difference between getting
    >a shot or not, but the original poster specifically asked about a macro
    >lens ie. he wants to capture detail. It is doubtful whether a big lens
    >such as a 400 (I have a 400 IS myself) will focus close enough to
    >capture the detail he is after. And if you want to stand a chance of
    >capturing flight shots, you'd need to be real lucky to even get one in
    >the viewfinder with a big lens. Birds have a fairly predictable flight
    >path, dragonflies definitely do not.
    >
    >I'm on a Canon system, and whilst I'm not saying this is definitely the
    >best lens for the job, I use a 100mm macro (150mm equivalent in 35mm
    >terms). Image stabilisation would be a definite bonus though.
    >
    >I only bought the lens 2 months ago (mostly I'm a bird photographer).
    >These are some of the shots I have taken with it.
    >
    >www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Emperor-in-flight.jpg
    >www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Azure-damsels-mating.jpg
    >www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Golden-ring.jpg
    >
    >....and you'll need to maximise your browser window to see this one at
    >its best.....
    >
    >www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Common-Darter-close-up.jpg
    >

    Excellent pictures, Paul! What month was this, which county?

    David
    --
    David Littlewood
     
    David Littlewood, Aug 23, 2005
    #18
  19. In message <>, David Littlewood
    <> writes
    >In article <>, Paul Flackett
    ><> writes
    >>>

    >>I can see how such a big lens might make the difference between
    >>getting a shot or not, but the original poster specifically asked
    >>about a macro lens ie. he wants to capture detail. It is doubtful
    >>whether a big lens such as a 400 (I have a 400 IS myself) will focus
    >>close enough to capture the detail he is after. And if you want to
    >>stand a chance of capturing flight shots, you'd need to be real lucky
    >>to even get one in the viewfinder with a big lens. Birds have a fairly
    >>predictable flight path, dragonflies definitely do not.
    >>
    >>I'm on a Canon system, and whilst I'm not saying this is definitely
    >>the best lens for the job, I use a 100mm macro (150mm equivalent in
    >>35mm terms). Image stabilisation would be a definite bonus though.
    >>
    >>I only bought the lens 2 months ago (mostly I'm a bird photographer).
    >>These are some of the shots I have taken with it.
    >>
    >>www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Emperor-in-flight.jpg
    >>www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Azure-damsels-mating.jpg
    >>www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Golden-ring.jpg
    >>
    >>....and you'll need to maximise your browser window to see this one at
    >>its best.....
    >>
    >>www.rainow.demon.co.uk/images/Common-Darter-close-up.jpg
    >>

    >Excellent pictures, Paul! What month was this, which county?
    >

    Thankyou David. June for the Golden Ringed, (Scottish Highlands), July
    for the Azures and Emperor (Cheshire), and August for the Darter (also
    Cheshire).

    Your name seems familiar David (probably just the surname). Do you post
    on the Focalpoint forums?

    --
    Paul Flackett
     
    Paul Flackett, Aug 23, 2005
    #19
  20. Graham Archer

    Deedee Tee Guest

    On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 09:24:59 -0400, "Mike" <> wrote:

    >Don't you mean Sigma 70-300 mm macro, yielding 1:2 ?
    >http://dhost.info/photocanon/sigma/index.htm?size=1&exif=&page=all


    No, what I had in mind is the Sigma AF 300 f/4 APO Macro, probably
    discontinued. A couple of models were made. Lighter and easier to
    handle than a zoom. Then of course there are the 70-300 Sigma macro
    zooms, at least three models are/were sold.

    They used to make even a 400 f/5.6 APO Macro, probably also 1:3.
     
    Deedee Tee, Aug 24, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Laohu

    Best MACRO lens for Nikon D100?

    Laohu, Dec 27, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    3,155
    Howard McCollister
    Dec 28, 2003
  2. Replies:
    2
    Views:
    495
    Charles
    Sep 28, 2005
  3. Annika1980

    DRAGONFLIES LOVE THE 20D !

    Annika1980, Jun 22, 2006, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    268
    Petri Lopia
    Jun 23, 2006
  4. Dragonflies love the...yada yada yada

    , Aug 11, 2006, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    316
    salgud
    Aug 21, 2006
  5. Giuen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,010
    Giuen
    Sep 12, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page