Best file sizes for emailing photos over DIAL-UP?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Big.David.NJ@gmail.com, Jan 30, 2008.

  1. Guest

    I am having some problems when receiving photos through email. I have
    a dial-up connection, as does a friend of mine and most of the time
    when I get a picture from her it is often 700kb... 800kb or at times
    well over a 1MB. It takes forever for it to download.

    Isn't this too big for dial-up users? I was under the impression that
    photos should be a much smaller file size, especially when dealing
    with people who have a dial-up connection.

    She often wonders if there could possibly be something my PC is doing
    in the process to enlarge the file size because I have an older
    machine but I told her that I thought that the file size was big
    because she SENT it that way.

    Any suggestions on what might be happening here?

    Thanks in advance

    DAVID
    , Jan 30, 2008
    #1
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  2. ray Guest

    On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 16:39:06 -0800, Big.David.NJ wrote:

    > I am having some problems when receiving photos through email. I have a
    > dial-up connection, as does a friend of mine and most of the time when I
    > get a picture from her it is often 700kb... 800kb or at times well over
    > a 1MB. It takes forever for it to download.
    >
    > Isn't this too big for dial-up users? I was under the impression that
    > photos should be a much smaller file size, especially when dealing with
    > people who have a dial-up connection.
    >
    > She often wonders if there could possibly be something my PC is doing in
    > the process to enlarge the file size because I have an older machine but
    > I told her that I thought that the file size was big because she SENT it
    > that way.
    >
    > Any suggestions on what might be happening here?
    >
    > Thanks in advance
    >
    > DAVID


    Makes me wonder what you're sending! I'd recommend rescaling to 1024x768
    or less, depending on what your monitor will do - what's the point of
    anything larger than that? And use a higher compression when you create
    the file. I should think 100k or less should be quite doable.
    ray, Jan 30, 2008
    #2
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  3. Guest

    On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 16:39:06 -0800 (PST), in rec.photo.digital
    wrote:

    >I am having some problems when receiving photos through email. I have
    >a dial-up connection, as does a friend of mine and most of the time
    >when I get a picture from her it is often 700kb... 800kb or at times
    >well over a 1MB. It takes forever for it to download.
    >
    >Isn't this too big for dial-up users? I was under the impression that
    >photos should be a much smaller file size, especially when dealing
    >with people who have a dial-up connection.
    >
    >She often wonders if there could possibly be something my PC is doing
    >in the process to enlarge the file size because I have an older
    >machine but I told her that I thought that the file size was big
    >because she SENT it that way.
    >
    >Any suggestions on what might be happening here?


    The first question, is what are you using these photos for? If you are just
    viewing them, not printing, then you might ask her to resize the photos to
    whatever screen resolution you are using before sending them to you.
    , Jan 30, 2008
    #3
  4. wrote:
    >I am having some problems when receiving photos through email. I have
    >a dial-up connection, as does a friend of mine and most of the time
    >when I get a picture from her it is often 700kb... 800kb or at times
    >well over a 1MB. It takes forever for it to download.
    >
    >Isn't this too big for dial-up users? I was under the impression that
    >photos should be a much smaller file size, especially when dealing
    >with people who have a dial-up connection.
    >
    >She often wonders if there could possibly be something my PC is doing
    >in the process to enlarge the file size because I have an older
    >machine but I told her that I thought that the file size was big
    >because she SENT it that way.
    >
    >Any suggestions on what might be happening here?


    Actually it can be many things. And yes, the problem is on the sending side,
    not the receiving side. There are several things the sender can do to reduce
    the file size:
    - First of all use a file format that is compressed. Most people do that
    anyway by sending e.g. JPG, but maybe someone is actually trying to send BMP
    or RAW.
    - Second choose a picture dimension that is appropriate for the viewing
    device. If viewing a photo on an old 800x600 monitor or even worse a 640x480
    picture frame then there is no point in sending a 3900x2600 picture (unless
    you expect to zoom in into that much more details).
    - And third choose a lossy compression rate that is appropriate for the
    purpose of the photo. If it's just a snapshot to look at and then forget it
    then a compression setting with a high loss is probably quite acceptable. If
    it's a picture you intend to print and frame then you may tolerate a larger
    file size in favour of less loss due to compression.

    Anyway, in case your friend is using Windows and Office then Outlook will
    allow her reduce the picture dimensions and file size according to the
    intended purpose when attaching the file to the email.
    And of course any decend photo editor software will support exporting of
    photos in different dimensions and compression rates.

    jue
    Jürgen Exner, Jan 30, 2008
    #4
  5. ray <> wrote:
    >On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 16:39:06 -0800, Big.David.NJ wrote:
    >
    >> I am having some problems when receiving photos through email. I have a
    >> dial-up connection, as does a friend of mine and most of the time when I
    >> get a picture from her it is often 700kb... 800kb or at times well over
    >> a 1MB. It takes forever for it to download.
    >>
    >> Isn't this too big for dial-up users? I was under the impression that
    >> photos should be a much smaller file size, especially when dealing with
    >> people who have a dial-up connection.
    >>
    >> She often wonders if there could possibly be something my PC is doing in
    >> the process to enlarge the file size because I have an older machine but
    >> I told her that I thought that the file size was big because she SENT it
    >> that way.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions on what might be happening here?
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance
    >>
    >> DAVID

    >
    >Makes me wonder what you're sending! I'd recommend rescaling to 1024x768
    >or less, depending on what your monitor will do - what's the point of
    >anything larger than that? And use a higher compression when you create
    >the file. I should think 100k or less should be quite doable.


    Hmmm, sorry, there is nothing the OP can do. It's the _sender_ who needs to
    take those steps.

    jue
    Jürgen Exner, Jan 30, 2008
    #5
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