Best colour for Sunglasses Lenses when taking photos

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Roland Karlsson, Aug 13, 2004.

  1. John <> wrote in news:eh8qh0hadadd3cjapnh5bsoqm1kvs7461j@
    4ax.com:

    > I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking pictures
    > abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for the lenses
    > ie brown or grey
    >


    What kind of question is that?

    The color of the sunglasses do not affect the pictures.

    And why should it be different "abroad"?


    /Roland
    Roland Karlsson, Aug 13, 2004
    #1
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  2. Roland Karlsson

    Terry Guest

    John wrote:

    >I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking pictures
    >abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for the lenses
    >ie brown or grey


    In my opinion it doesn't matter. Your brain is pretty good at adapting
    to lens colors, and letting you "see" the real colors. I suppose the
    best, theoretically, would be grey (like a neutral density filter),
    but it's almost impossible to get a good grey color for sunglasses. I
    would choose the sunglass color based on what seems good for normal
    viewing, and figure that will be pretty good for photography, as well.
    For me, that is the classic dark green color, but YMMV.

    However, avoid polarized sunglasses. Most LCD displays produce
    polarized light, and the LCD output will be invisible (or severly
    attenuated) when the camera is in one orienation or another.
    Typically, things work fine in the "normal" landscape orientation, but
    you can't see anything in portrait orientation.

    If you have an LCD viewfinder, this will affect everthing you see in
    the viewfinder. If you have an optical viewfinder, it won't affect
    your view of the scene, but it will affect the displays around the
    edges of the viewfinder (shutter speed, aperture, etc.).

    Similarly, it will affect your view of the LCD panel on the back of
    the camera (in one orientation or another).

    In particular, do not let an optician talk you into prescription
    polarized sunglasses. In my experience, most of them are not aware of
    this problem, and you will end up with an expensive pair of sunglasses
    that you will curse every time you turn your camera to portrait
    orientation. Been there, done that (though it was years ago on film
    SLR equipment). :)

    Terry
    Terry, Aug 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. Roland Karlsson

    Jimmy Smith Guest

    Amber and polarized.


    "John" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking pictures
    > abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for the lenses
    > ie brown or grey
    Jimmy Smith, Aug 13, 2004
    #3
  4. Roland Karlsson

    John Guest

    I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking pictures
    abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for the lenses
    ie brown or grey
    John, Aug 13, 2004
    #4
  5. Roland Karlsson

    Clyde Torres Guest

    "John" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking pictures
    > abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for the lenses
    > ie brown or grey


    Go with rose colored lenses and polarization so that you can see the cool
    pink center. Progressive lenses should allow you to resolve the RCHs.
    Clyde Torres, Aug 13, 2004
    #5
  6. Roland Karlsson

    Trey Guest

    Clyde Torres wrote:
    > "John" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking
    >> pictures abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for
    >> the lenses ie brown or grey

    >
    > Go with rose colored lenses and polarization so that you can see the
    > cool pink center. Progressive lenses should allow you to resolve the
    > RCHs.


    Yes, everyone in my family wears "rose colored glasses" and everything is
    just fine to them ;-)
    Trey, Aug 13, 2004
    #6
  7. In article <>,
    Terry <> wrote:
    >In my opinion it doesn't matter. Your brain is pretty good at adapting
    >to lens colors, and letting you "see" the real colors. I suppose the
    >best, theoretically, would be grey (like a neutral density filter),
    >but it's almost impossible to get a good grey color for sunglasses.


    Nikon has nice grey sunglasses. The one I have is not teribly strong,
    but I think it is nice to see the colors the way they are supposed to be.


    --
    The Electronic Monk was a labor-saving device, like a dishwasher or a video
    recorder. [...] Video recorders watched tedious television for you, thus saving
    you the bother of looking at it yourself; Electronic Monks believed things for
    you, [...] -- Douglas Adams in Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency
    Philip Homburg, Aug 13, 2004
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    Terry <> wrote:

    > ohn wrote:
    >
    > >I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking pictures
    > >abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for the lenses
    > >ie brown or grey

    >
    > In my opinion it doesn't matter. Your brain is pretty good at adapting
    > to lens colors, and letting you "see" the real colors. I suppose the
    > best, theoretically, would be grey (like a neutral density filter),
    > but it's almost impossible to get a good grey color for sunglasses. I
    > would choose the sunglass color based on what seems good for normal
    > viewing, and figure that will be pretty good for photography, as well.
    > For me, that is the classic dark green color, but YMMV.


    After reading this post, I had a short conversation with my office mate,
    who is a vision scientist, specializing in color vision. According to
    him, the story is complicated, but the following points about sunglasses
    are worth noting.

    It is true that your eye/brain meatware can adapt to looking through
    colored lenses. But the adaptation is not complete. Colored sunglasses
    do cause distortions in color perception. You may or may not prefer the
    effect of a particular lens tint, but that's a subjective issue.

    The adaptation has a time delay, and this causes short term
    after-effects (perceptual color shifts) when putting the glasses on or
    off. If you are frequently removing the sunglasses to operate your
    camera controls, or when looking through the viewfinder, these effects
    might be troublesome.

    There may be specific applications where certain lens tints are
    beneficial. For example: some fisherman claim that yellow tinted lenses
    improve their ability to see fish in shallow water. I don't know if
    that particular one is true, but I suspect that some of these claims are
    probably bogus.

    For a photographer concerned with color judgment, I suspect that a GOOD
    neutral gray lens is the best choice. Some lenses marketed as gray, are
    less neutral than others (the dyes can change or fade, too).

    > However, avoid polarized sunglasses. Most LCD displays produce
    > polarized light, and the LCD output will be invisible (or severly
    > attenuated) when the camera is in one orienation or another.


    > Similarly, it will affect your view of the LCD panel on the back of
    > the camera (in one orientation or another).


    That's true. Polarized lenses interfere with your ability to read LCD
    displays, because those devices control light with electronically
    switched polarizing elements.

    > In particular, do not let an optician talk you into prescription
    > polarized sunglasses. In my experience, most of them are not aware of
    > this problem, and you will end up with an expensive pair of sunglasses
    > that you will curse every time you turn your camera to portrait
    > orientation. Been there, done that (though it was years ago on film
    > SLR equipment). :)


    My experience is apparently different than yours. I use a pair of
    prescription, polarized, neutral gray sunglasses, and they are
    excellent. When I ordered sunglasses from my optician, I informed him
    that I was finicky about getting a good neutral color balance. I don't
    know where he sourced the lenses, but I love them. I shoot a lot of
    outdoor scenics, and I like the enhanced saturation that I can get from
    Velvia and a polarizing filter (on the camera). My sunglasses give me a
    view that is close to what I see on the Velvia slides. I do need to
    remove the sunglasses when I look through my SLR's viewfinder, or when I
    use my ladyfriend's digicam. But, with a retaining cord clipped on the
    shades, that's not a big hassle.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander
    Julian Vrieslander, Aug 14, 2004
    #8
  9. Roland Karlsson

    Jeremy Nixon Guest

    Julian Vrieslander <> wrote:

    > My experience is apparently different than yours. I use a pair of
    > prescription, polarized, neutral gray sunglasses, and they are
    > excellent. When I ordered sunglasses from my optician, I informed him
    > that I was finicky about getting a good neutral color balance. I don't
    > know where he sourced the lenses, but I love them. I shoot a lot of
    > outdoor scenics, and I like the enhanced saturation that I can get from
    > Velvia and a polarizing filter (on the camera). My sunglasses give me a
    > view that is close to what I see on the Velvia slides.


    I use polarized sunglasses while shooting, and the only issue I ever have
    with them is that I can forget I'm looking through a polarized lens but my
    camera isn't, and thus not think to put one on the camera. :)

    --
    Jeremy |
    Jeremy Nixon, Aug 14, 2004
    #9
  10. Roland Karlsson

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    Jeremy Nixon wrote:
    > Julian Vrieslander <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>My experience is apparently different than yours. I use a pair of
    >>prescription, polarized, neutral gray sunglasses, and they are
    >>excellent. When I ordered sunglasses from my optician, I informed him
    >>that I was finicky about getting a good neutral color balance. I don't
    >>know where he sourced the lenses, but I love them. I shoot a lot of
    >>outdoor scenics, and I like the enhanced saturation that I can get from
    >>Velvia and a polarizing filter (on the camera). My sunglasses give me a
    >>view that is close to what I see on the Velvia slides.

    >
    >
    > I use polarized sunglasses while shooting, and the only issue I ever have
    > with them is that I can forget I'm looking through a polarized lens but my
    > camera isn't, and thus not think to put one on the camera. :)
    >


    Hi...

    If you promise not to laugh too hard or long, I'll
    admit that I have put one on the camera...

    In the absence of anything else it did quite nicely
    take the glaring white off the lake :)

    Ken
    Ken Weitzel, Aug 14, 2004
    #10
  11. Roland Karlsson

    ArtKramr Guest

    >Subject: Best colour for Sunglasses Lenses when taking photos
    >From: John
    >Date: 8/13/2004 2:23 PM Pacific Standard Time
    >Message-id: <>
    >
    >I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking pictures
    >abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for the lenses
    >ie brown or grey
    >


    Bausch & Lomb Ray Bans in neutral. No color bias 100% UV absorption.


    Arthur Kramer
    344th BG 494th BS
    England, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany
    Visit my WW II B-26 website at:
    http://www.coastcomp.com/artkramer
    ArtKramr, Aug 14, 2004
    #11
  12. Roland Karlsson

    Clyde Torres Guest

    "Trey" <> wrote in message
    news:C1bTc.3668$...
    > Clyde Torres wrote:
    > > "John" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking
    > >> pictures abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for
    > >> the lenses ie brown or grey

    > >
    > > Go with rose colored lenses and polarization so that you can see the
    > > cool pink center. Progressive lenses should allow you to resolve the
    > > RCHs.

    >
    > Yes, everyone in my family wears "rose colored glasses" and everything is
    > just fine to them ;-)


    LOL, you must be Democrats. :)
    Clyde Torres, Aug 14, 2004
    #12
  13. Roland Karlsson

    Trey Guest

    Clyde Torres wrote:
    > "Trey" <> wrote in message
    > news:C1bTc.3668$...
    >> Clyde Torres wrote:
    >>> "John" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking
    >>>> pictures abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour
    >>>> for the lenses ie brown or grey
    >>>
    >>> Go with rose colored lenses and polarization so that you can see the
    >>> cool pink center. Progressive lenses should allow you to resolve
    >>> the RCHs.

    >>
    >> Yes, everyone in my family wears "rose colored glasses" and
    >> everything is just fine to them ;-)

    >
    > LOL, you must be Democrats. :)


    No actually, we are not. And from what I have read, this Kerry fellow will
    fubar things pretty good if he is put behind the wheel.

    http://www.swiftvets.com/

    uhoh... I think we just started a political firefight here! Ironic really..
    I was planning on going running after I post this.
    Trey, Aug 14, 2004
    #13
  14. If you do not leave your sunglasses on during the shooting and wait 30
    seconds before taking the off and taking a picture there is an advantage to
    using polarized sunglasses. They make you spot a scene that is worth taking
    with a polarizing filter but may otherwise be less dramatic. I always use
    polarizing sunglasses while driving.

    "Terry" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > John wrote:
    >
    > >I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking pictures
    > >abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for the lenses
    > >ie brown or grey

    >
    > In my opinion it doesn't matter. Your brain is pretty good at adapting
    > to lens colors, and letting you "see" the real colors. I suppose the
    > best, theoretically, would be grey (like a neutral density filter),
    > but it's almost impossible to get a good grey color for sunglasses. I
    > would choose the sunglass color based on what seems good for normal
    > viewing, and figure that will be pretty good for photography, as well.
    > For me, that is the classic dark green color, but YMMV.
    >
    > However, avoid polarized sunglasses. Most LCD displays produce
    > polarized light, and the LCD output will be invisible (or severly
    > attenuated) when the camera is in one orienation or another.
    > Typically, things work fine in the "normal" landscape orientation, but
    > you can't see anything in portrait orientation.
    >
    > If you have an LCD viewfinder, this will affect everthing you see in
    > the viewfinder. If you have an optical viewfinder, it won't affect
    > your view of the scene, but it will affect the displays around the
    > edges of the viewfinder (shutter speed, aperture, etc.).
    >
    > Similarly, it will affect your view of the LCD panel on the back of
    > the camera (in one orientation or another).
    >
    > In particular, do not let an optician talk you into prescription
    > polarized sunglasses. In my experience, most of them are not aware of
    > this problem, and you will end up with an expensive pair of sunglasses
    > that you will curse every time you turn your camera to portrait
    > orientation. Been there, done that (though it was years ago on film
    > SLR equipment). :)
    >
    > Terry
    >
    Dankwart Koehler, Aug 14, 2004
    #14
  15. "Terry" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > John wrote:
    >
    > >I an looking for a new pair of sunglasses to wear when taking pictures
    > >abroad and was wondering if there was a prefered colour for the lenses
    > >ie brown or grey

    >
    > In my opinion it doesn't matter. Your brain is pretty good at adapting
    > to lens colors, and letting you "see" the real colors. I suppose the
    > best, theoretically, would be grey (like a neutral density filter),
    > but it's almost impossible to get a good grey color for sunglasses. I
    > would choose the sunglass color based on what seems good for normal
    > viewing, and figure that will be pretty good for photography, as well.
    > For me, that is the classic dark green color, but YMMV.
    >
    > However, avoid polarized sunglasses. Most LCD displays produce
    > polarized light, and the LCD output will be invisible (or severly
    > attenuated) when the camera is in one orienation or another.
    > Typically, things work fine in the "normal" landscape orientation, but
    > you can't see anything in portrait orientation.


    Blue blocker sunglasses can change colors drastically. I wear flip-ups to
    protect my eyes, and raise them when I need to judge colors.

    >
    > If you have an LCD viewfinder, this will affect everthing you see in
    > the viewfinder. If you have an optical viewfinder, it won't affect
    > your view of the scene, but it will affect the displays around the
    > edges of the viewfinder (shutter speed, aperture, etc.).
    >
    > Similarly, it will affect your view of the LCD panel on the back of
    > the camera (in one orientation or another).
    >
    > In particular, do not let an optician talk you into prescription
    > polarized sunglasses. In my experience, most of them are not aware of
    > this problem, and you will end up with an expensive pair of sunglasses
    > that you will curse every time you turn your camera to portrait
    > orientation. Been there, done that (though it was years ago on film
    > SLR equipment). :)
    >
    > Terry
    >
    Marvin Margoshes, Aug 15, 2004
    #15
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