Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Justin, Nov 8, 2004.

  1. Justin

    Justin Guest

    http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109986994931767086,00.html?mod=yahoo_hs

    > The devils are its worst customers. They buy products, apply for
    > rebates, return the purchases, then buy them back at
    > returned-merchandise discounts. They load up on "loss leaders,"
    > severely discounted merchandise designed to boost store traffic, then
    > flip the goods at a profit on eBay. They slap down rock-bottom price
    > quotes from Web sites and demand that Best Buy make good on its
    > lowest-price pledge. "They can wreak enormous economic havoc," says
    > Mr. Anderson.


    While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
    returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates?? Or buying
    only loss leaders?
    Justin, Nov 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Justin

    Mike Kohary Guest

    Justin wrote:
    > http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109986994931767086,00.html?mod=yahoo_hs
    >
    >> The devils are its worst customers. They buy products, apply for
    >> rebates, return the purchases, then buy them back at
    >> returned-merchandise discounts. They load up on "loss leaders,"
    >> severely discounted merchandise designed to boost store traffic, then
    >> flip the goods at a profit on eBay. They slap down rock-bottom price
    >> quotes from Web sites and demand that Best Buy make good on its
    >> lowest-price pledge. "They can wreak enormous economic havoc," says
    >> Mr. Anderson.

    >
    > While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
    > returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates?? Or buying
    > only loss leaders?


    People that apply for rebates, and then return the merchandise. :)

    In the retail world, this type of strategy is largely unprecedented, but
    it's been happening in other areas of business for a long time. "The
    customer is always right," is the mantra we often hear, but the dirty little
    secret is that the mantra isn't true. Sometimes, customers are just plain
    wrong and overly demanding. Just because a consumer wants to buy something,
    doesn't then entitle them to the world, which unfortunately many customers
    believe.

    Some customers just aren't worth the hassle. In my own business (I'm a
    photographer), I've turned away clients who cost me more in time and energy
    than they're worth. If I can service 3 other clients in the time it takes
    me to service one ornery, picky client, then it's not worth it to me to
    retain that single client. I let them down easy, to be sure, but I'd rather
    let someone else deal with them.

    Here's another good example of this principle at work (though the specific
    story is an urban legend, the philosophy behind it is not):

    http://www.snopes.com/business/consumer/bethune.asp

    In my opinion, a good business goes out of its way to satisfy customers, but
    only to a reasonable extent. It does not necessarily believe that the
    customer is always right, because some customers are simply wrong. Some
    people are unreasonable jerks, and nothing you can do will satisfy them -
    trying to do so mostly hurts your business in the end. It's best to try and
    recognize those customers and then jettison them, employing as much damage
    control as possible.

    Best Buy, as a retailer, is breaking new ground in their business niche.
    For my part, I think it's about damned time. :)

    --
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Mike Kohary mike at kohary dot com http://www.kohary.com

    Karma Photography: http://www.karmaphotography.com
    Seahawks Historical Database: http://www.kohary.com/seahawks
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Mike Kohary, Nov 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. Justin <> wrote:

    > While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
    > returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates??


    Just about every rebate offer I've ever seen required the original UPC
    code from the box. If Best Buy is actually getting scammed this way,
    it's because their employees don't inspect the returned items carefully.
    I know from personal experience that they don't: I've seen *defective*
    returned items put back out for sale.


    > Or buying only loss leaders?


    From scanning the WSJ article, my impression is that Brad Anderson is
    one of those CEOs who see his customers as adversaries to be beaten.
    Best Buy has always crapped on its customers, and many of them know it.
    They shop there primarily for price, not for the expertise of the
    employees or the quality of the shopping experience.

    Best Buy is not going to entice high-end customers from the salons nor
    low-end customers from Wal-Mart, etc; and consumers who are
    sophisticated as well as price-sensitive are moving to the Internet for
    their electronics purchases. Know anybody who's going to buy his next
    computer from Best Buy?
    Neill Massello, Nov 9, 2004
    #3
  4. Justin

    Justin Guest

    Neill Massello wrote on [Tue, 09 Nov 2004 00:24:12 GMT]:
    > Justin <> wrote:
    >
    >> While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
    >> returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates??

    >
    > Just about every rebate offer I've ever seen required the original UPC
    > code from the box.


    Exactly! And how do they return an item if they can't scan it to know
    it's price etc?

    > If Best Buy is actually getting scammed this way,
    > it's because their employees don't inspect the returned items carefully.
    > I know from personal experience that they don't: I've seen *defective*
    > returned items put back out for sale.


    Yep.

    >> Or buying only loss leaders?

    >
    > From scanning the WSJ article, my impression is that Brad Anderson is
    > one of those CEOs who see his customers as adversaries to be beaten.
    > Best Buy has always crapped on its customers, and many of them know it.
    > They shop there primarily for price, not for the expertise of the
    > employees or the quality of the shopping experience.
    >
    > Best Buy is not going to entice high-end customers from the salons nor
    > low-end customers from Wal-Mart, etc; and consumers who are
    > sophisticated as well as price-sensitive are moving to the Internet for
    > their electronics purchases. Know anybody who's going to buy his next
    > computer from Best Buy?


    I don't think I know many people that EVER bought a PC at Best Buy.
    Justin, Nov 9, 2004
    #4
  5. Justin

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <2go.com>, Justin
    <> wrote:

    > Neill Massello wrote on [Tue, 09 Nov 2004 00:24:12 GMT]:
    > > Justin <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
    > >> returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates??

    > >
    > > Just about every rebate offer I've ever seen required the original UPC
    > > code from the box.

    >
    > Exactly! And how do they return an item if they can't scan it to know
    > it's price etc?
    >

    I just bought a digital camera and printer from Best Buy, and the
    rebate for one of them (a $25 gift card) needed a photocopy of the UPC
    code.

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
    Invid Fan, Nov 9, 2004
    #5
  6. Justin

    Bill Guest


    >
    > In the retail world, this type of strategy is largely unprecedented, but
    > it's been happening in other areas of business for a long time. "The
    > customer is always right," is the mantra we often hear, but the dirty
    > little secret is that the mantra isn't true. Sometimes, customers are
    > just plain wrong and overly demanding. Just because a consumer wants to
    > buy something, doesn't then entitle them to the world, which unfortunately
    > many customers believe.
    >


    Amen. I don't run a business, but I worked in customer service for a catalog
    mail order company long enough to realize how ridiculous that the "customer
    is always right" mantra actually is.

    The company that I worked for (a two-bit operation called "Newport News
    Catalog," which was more famous for backorders than anything else) was a
    subsidiary of the almost-dead Spiegel catalog, which gave me access to the
    Spiegel customer service database. Though I tried to satisfy callers within
    reason, I was very suspicious of a customer's "didn't get my merchandise"
    claim one evening, as it was the second or third claim in a short period of
    time. I then checked that same customer's history in the Spiegel
    database--jeez all mighty...Spiegel reps, over a period of 18 months, had
    issued credit after credit after credit to this person for items ordered and
    allegedly not received, items returned and no credits issued, order received
    but incomplete, etc., etc., etc...one rep even wrote in a comment field
    about how friendly the customer was...sure, that customer had a reason to be
    friendly--she had stumbled across a gold mine in the Spiegel customer
    service department.

    In this case, I blame the company as much as I blame the customer, as their
    reps obviously didn't bother checking this customer's history before blindly
    issuing credits...but it's a shining example of the type of bilking that can
    and does happen.

    There's a time and a place to politely but firmly say, "We don't want your
    business--please go somewhere else."
    Bill, Nov 9, 2004
    #6
  7. >In my opinion, a good business goes out of its way to satisfy customers, but
    >only to a reasonable extent. It does not necessarily believe that the
    >customer is always right, because some customers are simply wrong. Some
    >people are unreasonable jerks, and nothing you can do will satisfy them -
    >trying to do so mostly hurts your business in the end. It's best to try and
    >recognize those customers and then jettison them, employing as much damage
    >control as possible.


    Unfortunately, that is too true.

    I believe in the mantra that "the customer is always right." However, I also
    believe that it also expects the customer to be honorable and not try take
    advantage of the mantra to selfishly and intentionally defraud a business.
    It's, more or less, about mutual respect between the customer and the business.


    As long as you respect the customer and his needs, the customer should respect
    you and your needs, which is what I believe the term implies as opposed to
    making a direct and literal statement that the customer is always right. It's
    a philosophy, and the meaning of philosophies can mean more, less, or be
    different than what is literally suggested.

    If you respect the customer, but the customer doesn't respect you, then he's
    wasting your time that you could use on serious customers that may be more
    deserving of your services. In that case, that particular customer doesn't
    deserve courtesy because he's not being courteous to you and is certainly not
    out to buy something from you without getting some freebies in the process or
    some other mischief that works at your expense.

    I've seen cases when I was in a retail store where salespeople had to kick out
    a customer. Turns out he was acting like an asshole, trying to get something
    done that was against store policy like an immediate refund at a particular
    amount where policy dictates issuing a check from the corporate offices or
    being overly disrespectful to the employees.

    I recall one situation, where a customer referred to a female employee as
    "woman" in her face in brutish "redneck" fashion for lack of a better term. Of
    course, the manager had some things to say to the customer for his repeated
    demeaning remarks before ordering him to leave the store.

    I have no sympathy for those kinds of customers. I sympathize only to
    customers who just wants things to be fair. - Reinhart
    LASERandDVDfan, Nov 9, 2004
    #7
  8. >Best Buy is not going to entice high-end customers from the salons

    Pretty much. They have expectations that are usually too high for Best Buy to
    even meet.

    Looking for Denon? Nope, Best Buy doesn't carry them.

    How about Sony ES? They carry Sony. But, that's not Sony ES.

    How about Martin Logan. "Who?" is what you may likely hear when you ask about
    Martin Logan speakers at a Best Buy.

    And, try to avoid any white vans you might see in the BB parking lot with those
    crooks ... uh ... sales representatives selling "Dogg Digital" or "Theater
    Research" speakers at "a super low price when compared to the $1000 asking
    price."

    (In case you're wondering, no. I have never bought speakers from the back of
    vans. I know about them and the fact that the speakers they sell blow under
    moderate loads that are far from clipping from the amplifier.) Check these out
    for a good laugh, especially the frequency response curve and, on one of them,
    the impedance curve.

    http://www.gr-research.com/dahlton.htm

    http://www.gr-research.com/diyevents/white.htm

    nor
    >low-end customers from Wal-Mart


    True, too. They would probably look at a Yamaha receiver and say "Geez, I
    thought Yamaha only made motorcycles!" They'd also shrug off the price of the
    Yamaha and go for a Durabrand HTiB with a built-in DVD player, because "it's
    cheap but should be just as good."

    consumers who are
    >sophisticated as well as price-sensitive are moving to the Internet for
    >their electronics purchases.


    True, to an extent.

    >Know anybody who's going to buy his next
    >computer from Best Buy?


    Not me. After building my first computer, I can never even fathom buying
    another computer if I can't assemble it myself with parts that I've
    specifically chosen.

    For instance, I want to make sure that I have a Seagate or a Maxtor drive
    instead of running the chance that my new computer would get a Quantum. -
    Reinhart
    LASERandDVDfan, Nov 9, 2004
    #8
  9. Justin

    Invid Fan Guest

    In article <sQVjd.9564$>, Bill
    <> wrote:

    > >
    > > In the retail world, this type of strategy is largely unprecedented, but
    > > it's been happening in other areas of business for a long time. "The
    > > customer is always right," is the mantra we often hear, but the dirty
    > > little secret is that the mantra isn't true. Sometimes, customers are
    > > just plain wrong and overly demanding. Just because a consumer wants to
    > > buy something, doesn't then entitle them to the world, which unfortunately
    > > many customers believe.
    > >

    >
    > Amen. I don't run a business, but I worked in customer service for a catalog
    > mail order company long enough to realize how ridiculous that the "customer
    > is always right" mantra actually is.
    >
    > The company that I worked for (a two-bit operation called "Newport News
    > Catalog," which was more famous for backorders than anything else) was a
    > subsidiary of the almost-dead Spiegel catalog, which gave me access to the
    > Spiegel customer service database. Though I tried to satisfy callers within
    > reason, I was very suspicious of a customer's "didn't get my merchandise"
    > claim one evening, as it was the second or third claim in a short period of
    > time. I then checked that same customer's history in the Spiegel
    > database--jeez all mighty...Spiegel reps, over a period of 18 months, had
    > issued credit after credit after credit to this person for items ordered and
    > allegedly not received, items returned and no credits issued, order received
    > but incomplete, etc., etc., etc...one rep even wrote in a comment field
    > about how friendly the customer was...sure, that customer had a reason to be
    > friendly--she had stumbled across a gold mine in the Spiegel customer
    > service department.
    >
    > In this case, I blame the company as much as I blame the customer, as their
    > reps obviously didn't bother checking this customer's history before blindly
    > issuing credits...but it's a shining example of the type of bilking that can
    > and does happen.
    >
    > There's a time and a place to politely but firmly say, "We don't want your
    > business--please go somewhere else."
    >

    An article in the local paper mentioned that some stores will now
    refuse to accept returns if you have a habit of returning things. A
    woman found she couldn't return a dress she didn't want (unworn, with
    the tags still attached) due to a large number of returns. Well, she
    said, she spent $2000 a year at the store so would naturally have more
    returns then a casual customer. If you shop at a number of retailers
    that all use the same service, your combined returns will count against
    you.

    --
    Chris Mack "Refugee, total shit. That's how I've always seen us.
    'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
    -'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
    Invid Fan, Nov 9, 2004
    #9
  10. Justin

    tacitus Guest

    In article <2go.com>,
    says...
    > http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB109986994931767086,00.html?mod=yahoo_hs
    >
    > > The devils are its worst customers. They buy products, apply for
    > > rebates, return the purchases, then buy them back at
    > > returned-merchandise discounts. They load up on "loss leaders,"
    > > severely discounted merchandise designed to boost store traffic, then
    > > flip the goods at a profit on eBay. They slap down rock-bottom price
    > > quotes from Web sites and demand that Best Buy make good on its
    > > lowest-price pledge. "They can wreak enormous economic havoc," says
    > > Mr. Anderson.

    >
    > While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
    > returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates?? Or buying
    > only loss leaders?
    >
    >
    >

    Alas, as far as I can tell Best Buy has started some
    cheap sh*t behaviour in the last few months. For
    example, offering an 8-issue subscription for sport
    illustrated or entertainment weekly if you use a
    credit card while checking out. Then after you
    accept, you are handed a densely worded thing to
    sign which says your credit card will be automatically
    charged after the 8 issues. If you were unwise and
    did not notice you would possibly get a subscription
    you really did not want. To be fair, I did notice
    and it was easy to cancel; but I feel its goal was
    to mislead people who aren't paying attention. There
    was something else that irritated me, but I can't
    remember

    [I apologize if this is sent multiple times; my
    client and/or connection had been acting up lately]
    tacitus, Nov 9, 2004
    #10

  11. > While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
    > returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates?? Or buying
    > only loss leaders?
    >
    >


    I can sympathize with some of their problems, many of them could easily be
    solved. However, at their Salem, Oregon store, they do as much as possible
    to drive away ALL customers, not just the bad ones. I go there maybe once
    every couple of months for specific needs (and to avoid Circuit City
    whenever possible).

    Here are some of the things I've noticed at Best Buy in the last year:

    1. Numerous checkout stands, but almost never more than about 2 registers
    open, regardless of the length of lines.

    2. One checkout line open on one visit, with about 8 people in line.
    Instead of hustling them through the line, the clerk at the register was
    having a customer fill out rebate forms! This went on for at least 5
    minutes with nobody getting to pay for their purchase. I finally dropped
    the 2 DVD's I'd picked up on the counter and told them I didn't have time to
    wait like this.

    3. Usually there appear to be 12-16 employees on the floor. However, the
    majority of them are standing around in groups of 2-3, joking and chatting.
    Try to find one in the area where you want to purchase something, let alone
    one who knows anything. If you do find one it's "I'll have to find somebody
    else to help you" then you never see them again. The camera and cell phone
    areas seldom have any sales help around.

    4. Try getting an answer to a question. I bought a 32" TV for my mother a
    couple of weeks ago. Although I had measured carefully, mom was a bit
    paranoid, so she asked the young lady at the register if she could return it
    if it didn't fit in her entertainment stand. The answer? "Um, yeah, I'm
    pretty sure you can". Fabulous! I could just see myself at the "Customer
    Service" counter the next day: "Well, Cindy said she was, um, pretty sure I
    could return it".

    If they want their customers to be a better class, they need to pick up
    their staff quality quite a few notches too. If they don't want customers
    just to buy loss leaders, advertise them like "Shrek 2 DVD $9.99 with any
    $20 purchase" or something like that--problem solved. Basically I consider
    the store completely self-service--don't count on any employees to know
    anything or help you in any way. They should just go all the way and put in
    a self-service checkout stand like Home Depot and some grocery stores have,
    and be done with it. At least to my knowledge they don't go out of their
    way to lie to you and misinform you to move merchandise, like Circuit City.
    I think they just aren't smart enough to pull it off.
    Psych-O-Delic Voodoo Thunder Pig, Nov 9, 2004
    #11
  12. >Usually there appear to be 12-16 employees on the floor. However, the
    >majority of them are standing around in groups of 2-3, joking and chatting.
    >Try to find one in the area where you want to purchase something, let alone
    >one who knows anything.


    Well, this is what happens when you have no commission for the workers. There
    is no incentive to go out of your way to help the customer. - Reinhart
    LASERandDVDfan, Nov 9, 2004
    #12
  13. Justin

    Justin Guest

    LASERandDVDfan wrote on [09 Nov 2004 04:48:38 GMT]:
    >>Usually there appear to be 12-16 employees on the floor. However, the
    >>majority of them are standing around in groups of 2-3, joking and chatting.
    >>Try to find one in the area where you want to purchase something, let alone
    >>one who knows anything.

    >
    > Well, this is what happens when you have no commission for the workers. There
    > is no incentive to go out of your way to help the customer. - Reinhart


    And when you have commission you get hounded by the sales staff and lied
    to.
    Justin, Nov 9, 2004
    #13
  14. Justin

    Justin Guest

    Psych-O-Delic Voodoo Thunder Pig wrote on [Tue, 09 Nov 2004 04:15:42 GMT]:
    > If they want their customers to be a better class, they need to pick up
    > their staff quality quite a few notches too.


    Hah! How many stores actually have people that know what they're talking
    about anymore?

    Big box stores that is.
    Justin, Nov 9, 2004
    #14
  15. >And when you have commission you get hounded by the sales staff and lied
    >to.


    Well, that's true, too.

    This is why I'd never want to work in retail. To me, either way, you're going
    to get screwed.

    But, that's what happens when most people try to work in America I suppose.
    Not a knock on the country, but that's what it seems what with lower healthcare
    standards and shipping off jobs to India. - Reinhart
    LASERandDVDfan, Nov 9, 2004
    #15
  16. Justin

    Kevin Guest

    LASERandDVDfan <> wrote:
    > >And when you have commission you get hounded by the sales staff and lied
    > >to.


    > Well, that's true, too.


    > This is why I'd never want to work in retail. To me, either way, you're going
    > to get screwed.


    Agreed.

    You know, I truly think I would make a better salesman than the guys I often
    see in those stores. Not necessarily for any reason other than I know a loot
    of stuff because I'm an impulsive buyer and a gadget geek (not a good
    combination, btw).

    The other day I was in looking at the new iMac G5 and a family came in
    looking at buying a PowerBook. The salesguy was next to clueless. They
    asked him questions like if they could use MSN Messenger to do webcam chats
    from the Mac to their Windows friends. The salesguy was stammering "Uh,
    you should be able to do that, I think so..." and I stood quietly behind him
    shaking my head in big exaggerated motions... because I know from experience
    that they can't. (Microsoft cripped the Mac version of MSN Messenger, I'll
    give you three guesses why...)

    From that point on the salesguy included me in the conversation as I was his
    technical consultant, so to speak. They'd ask him a question, he'd answer
    to his best ability and then turn to me and say "What about you, do you
    have any experience with that?" I was able to help him answer a lot of
    questions and make the sale.. which was a nice feeling to be able to help.

    I've done this before, helping people with digital cameras and other stuff..
    and I am in need of a part-time job... so I figure, why not? But the
    places that give commissions wouldn't like me because I would want to give
    the customers lots of space, not get in the way, not upsell, not be afraid
    to recommend better ways to save money, not be afraid to say "Hey, don't
    buy that now, they're about to release a new version with better specs
    for less money, just wait three weeks".

    I have a friend who worked at Best Buy, and he got so turned off working with
    annoying customers that he quit, but was pretty close to being fired for
    arguing with customers wanting to do stupid things.

    The industry's just so cut-throat that people like me, who might actually
    give a crap, would be way overshadowed by the other drones who just want
    to push sales no matter what.
    Kevin, Nov 9, 2004
    #16
  17. Justin

    Sound Junkie Guest

    On Mon, 8 Nov 2004 13:11:29 -0800, "Mike Kohary" <>
    wrote:

    >In the retail world, this type of strategy is largely unprecedented, but
    >it's been happening in other areas of business for a long time. "The
    >customer is always right," is the mantra we often hear, but the dirty little
    >secret is that the mantra isn't true.


    Well, it's true after all, yet not every retailer realizes that.

    >Sometimes, customers are just plain
    >wrong and overly demanding. Just because a consumer wants to buy something,
    >doesn't then entitle them to the world, which unfortunately many customers
    >believe.


    "Some" doesn't mean "all". For the overhead $$ I'm payng when shopping
    at stores I am entitled to flexibility. Whatever it takes. If I want
    to return -- I will, no matter what. Their policy says that I have a
    privilege to do so. It doesn't say how many times I can return
    merchandise before I get banned from the store.

    >Some customers just aren't worth the hassle. In my own business (I'm a
    >photographer), I've turned away clients who cost me more in time and energy
    >than they're worth. If I can service 3 other clients in the time it takes
    >me to service one ornery, picky client, then it's not worth it to me to
    >retain that single client. I let them down easy, to be sure, but I'd rather
    >let someone else deal with them.


    Looks like you tend to belong to the worst breed of the service
    providers/retailers, who ultimately shift any problems on their
    customers' shoulders. Not good. "I'd rather do a mediocre or even
    shitty job for the same amount of $$, rather than take any extra
    effort." Picky customers are not always jerks, but you rather
    consider them as such to makes an excuse.

    >Here's another good example of this principle at work (though the specific
    >story is an urban legend, the philosophy behind it is not):
    >
    >http://www.snopes.com/business/consumer/bethune.asp
    >
    >In my opinion, a good business goes out of its way to satisfy customers, but
    >only to a reasonable extent.


    Sorry, but this is plain bull. Look at Amazon.com vs. Best Buy. No
    matter how many years I shopped there, I had no wish to take any
    advantage of them. Why? Because I have a great deal of respect for
    such a type of business, who stand behind their word and make *every*
    attempt to resolve any possible problem. On the other hand, Best Buy
    and such always make their living by using deception, fine print,
    sleazy marketing and minimum investment in order to maximize profit.
    When I'm being lied to everytime I go there, of course, I will take
    from them whatever I can. Simply they don't deserve anything better.

    >It does not necessarily believe that the
    >customer is always right, because some customers are simply wrong. Some
    >people are unreasonable jerks, and nothing you can do will satisfy them -
    >trying to do so mostly hurts your business in the end. It's best to try and
    >recognize those customers and then jettison them, employing as much damage
    >control as possible.


    The example described is rather an exception - being rude is off
    limits. But if your customer plainly demands more than you'd expect
    from him on average, or takes your deceptive promises literally, you
    need to stand behind your reputation and do whatever it takes to
    satisfy him. Once you're off that track - you're off my radar. Shame
    on you!

    >Best Buy, as a retailer, is breaking new ground in their business niche.
    >For my part, I think it's about damned time. :)


    Yes, yes, whatever...
    Sound Junkie, Nov 9, 2004
    #17
  18. >You know, I truly think I would make a better salesman than the guys I often
    >see in those stores. Not necessarily for any reason other than I know a loot
    >of stuff because I'm an impulsive buyer and a gadget geek (not a good
    >combination, btw).


    Sometimes, I think that way about myself.

    However, if you work as a sales person, you're not expected to inform the
    customer. You're expected to make the customer go for the buy and keep him
    from thinking about the purchase.

    >(Microsoft cripped the Mac version of MSN Messenger, I'll
    >give you three guesses why...)


    Windows, Windows, and, well, Windows. ;-p

    The three guesses have turned to three of the same answer to show how
    monopolistic Windows is. However, a good chunk of the world runs on it, so it
    turns out to be a necessary evil, despite the fact that MacOS X and Linux are
    superior in quite a few ways.

    Heck, I'm using a computer with XP Pro installed, but I've not had too many
    troubles as I do housekeeping on it, including accessing the Windows Update
    database weekly.

    But, I still wished I had a G5. Best thing for A/V work.

    Thank god for annoyances.org. - Reinhart
    LASERandDVDfan, Nov 9, 2004
    #18
  19. Justin

    M.B. Guest

    I used to work at Best Buy a little over 4 years ago. I was there for a
    year and a half and for the first year I worked in the computer/Home
    Office department. Shortly before I left they started pushing the $400
    rebate if you signed up with MSN for dialup for 3 years. They've since
    abandoned that and are now pushing those magazine subscriptions.

    RE: magazine subscriptions
    If you don't know that you're going to be automatically signed up once
    the free period is through, then you're a fool. That's true regardless
    of where you get those free issues; be it Best Buy or in another magazine.

    By the time I finished with Best Buy I was ready to move on. I quit
    because they weren't willing to work with me when I needed to go out of
    town for further education. I was sick of selling the PSP's
    (Performance Service Plans, i.e. warranties). They pushed us hard to
    sell those things as well as the accessories. Their largest profit
    margin is on the PSP's and the accessories (whether you really needed
    them or not). I tell you, we really pushed that stuff hard. We pushed
    it so hard that if you didn't know any better you would swear we were on
    commission. I can certainly assure you that we never got a single penny
    on that stuff. OTOH, if we did well as a department or store by hitting
    our numbers the supervisors and managers sure as hell benefited.

    I can attest to the common problem with not being able to find a
    salesperson in the department you're browsing. The problem is that they
    often had you running around the store doing other things. I worked in
    the appliance department the last six months and was always in the
    warehouse taking care of delivery issues and other problems.

    So when you need someone and they're not in their department that other
    sales person you find is probably trying to find that employee.

    RE: check out lines
    That's been a problem for ages and it doesn't seem to be one that
    they're willing to bite the bullet and adequately solve by hiring more
    checkers. So what's their solution? Oh why not pull the understaffed
    sales persons from their departments and have them run up and check
    people out. Or what generally happens is just as the one poster
    mentioned, the lines just get long and you're in line forever.

    Some employees are up to date with the merchandise that they sell. But
    that is indeed an exception. The problem is that the company doesn't
    really care to adequately train you. They only care if you sell the
    PSP's and accessories. As long as you know how to sell those items, you
    were fine with everything else.

    I'm not proud to admit this, but there were a number of occasions when
    someone came in to purchase a big ticket item and refused to buy the
    PSP. Because our numbers were based on percentages of the PSP
    applicable item to the actual cost of the PSP a big ticket item without
    a PSP would hurt our numbers. e.g. $2000 computer with a $200 PSP was
    10%. A $2000 computer withOUT a PSP would obviously hurt the numbers.
    Anyways, a number of times we would lie to the customers and say we were
    out of stock of that said item. The managers knew we would do this and
    while they never completely came out and endorsed this practice, they
    were certainly glad when it did.

    Best Buy has a lot of potential. And the only reason why they're so
    successful, IMO, is because they're the only game in town in most
    places. Most people seem to loathe to shop at Circuit City because of
    their history of bad customer service. If Best Buy wants to remain
    competitive they're going to have to work really hard on their customer
    service. And perhaps instead of giving managers bonuses for everything
    imaginable they should hire more employees and train them better. I
    doubt that will happen, but that's the only reason to shop at a brick
    and mortar store these days. Ok, that and convenience. But it's
    becoming too easy to shop online these days.
    M.B., Nov 9, 2004
    #19
  20. Justin

    Tarkus Guest

    On 11/8/2004 9:51:47 PM, Justin wrote:

    > LASERandDVDfan wrote on [09 Nov 2004 04:48:38 GMT]:
    >>> Usually there appear to be 12-16 employees on the floor. However,
    >>> the majority of them are standing around in groups of 2-3, joking
    >>> and chatting. Try to find one in the area where you want to purchase
    >>> something, let alone one who knows anything.

    >>
    >> Well, this is what happens when you have no commission for the
    >> workers. There is no incentive to go out of your way to help the
    >> customer. - Reinhart

    >
    > And when you have commission you get hounded by the sales staff and
    > lied to.


    Bingo. I hate stores with commissioned sales staff.
    --
    "I'll catch this bird for you, but it ain't gonna be easy. Bad fish!
    Not like going down to the pond and chasing bluegills and tommycocks.
    This shark, swallow you whole. No shakin', no tenderizin', down you go."
    Tarkus, Nov 9, 2004
    #20
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