Best B&W digital photography techniques

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mike Henley, Nov 17, 2004.

  1. Mike Henley

    Mike Henley Guest

    Okay, I'm *not* really interested in printing at the moment, so let's
    leave that aside.

    Have a look at this guy's work http://www.pbase.com/janung
    Yes, he definitely was shooting film in 1978, not digital, but I find
    it very inspiring. So, how do you mimic b&w photography with a digital
    camera?

    Here's what I might do; shoot digital (color JPEG or RAW) with manual
    or spot exposure (and an autobracketted-exposure 3-shots won't harm),
    no flash, just using natural available light, then use the histogram
    in post-processing to adjust contrast and tones?

    Well, what do you do?
    Mike Henley, Nov 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. Mike Henley

    Harvey Guest

    "Mike Henley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Okay, I'm *not* really interested in printing at the moment, so let's
    > leave that aside.
    >
    > Have a look at this guy's work http://www.pbase.com/janung
    > Yes, he definitely was shooting film in 1978, not digital, but I find
    > it very inspiring. So, how do you mimic b&w photography with a digital
    > camera?
    >
    > Here's what I might do; shoot digital (color JPEG or RAW) with manual
    > or spot exposure (and an autobracketted-exposure 3-shots won't harm),
    > no flash, just using natural available light, then use the histogram
    > in post-processing to adjust contrast and tones?
    >
    > Well, what do you do?


    I find it easier to put my camera into Black and White mode.
    Harvey, Nov 18, 2004
    #2
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  3. (Mike Henley) wrote in
    news::

    > Okay, I'm *not* really interested in printing at the moment, so let's
    > leave that aside.
    >
    > Have a look at this guy's work http://www.pbase.com/janung
    > Yes, he definitely was shooting film in 1978, not digital, but I find
    > it very inspiring. So, how do you mimic b&w photography with a digital
    > camera?
    >
    > Here's what I might do; shoot digital (color JPEG or RAW) with manual
    > or spot exposure (and an autobracketted-exposure 3-shots won't harm),
    > no flash, just using natural available light, then use the histogram
    > in post-processing to adjust contrast and tones?
    >
    > Well, what do you do?


    Technically, there's no such thing as digital B&W. I usually shoot film
    when I want B&W.

    --
    "We are twice armed if we fight with faith." (Plato)

    -Richard Cockburn
    Richard Cockburn, Nov 18, 2004
    #3
  4. Mike Henley

    Guest

    In message <Xns95A4CDA166945n@130.133.1.4>,
    Richard Cockburn <> wrote:

    >Technically, there's no such thing as digital B&W. I usually shoot film
    >when I want B&W.


    Kodak made a digital without a color filter array, but they discontinued
    it.

    Digital isn't any more "color" than it is "B&W". Digital B&W in inkjet
    prints and on the monitor simply do not have the luminance properties of
    silver halide particles, giving a different look.
    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
    , Nov 18, 2004
    #4
  5. wrote in news::

    > Digital isn't any more "color" than it is "B&W".


    That is so true, but I find the "color" results to be more acceptable than
    "b&w" results. T-Max or Tri-Pan gives me the B&W look I like. My 20D is not
    capable of that.

    --
    "We are twice armed if we fight with faith." (Plato)

    -Richard Cockburn
    Richard Cockburn, Nov 18, 2004
    #5
  6. Richard Cockburn <> wrote in
    news:Xns95A4DAEB6C5B5n@130.133.1.4:

    > T-Max or Tri-Pan gives me the B&W look I like.


    I meant Tri-X on the second one. Lack of sleep. ;-)


    --
    "We are twice armed if we fight with faith." (Plato)

    -Richard Cockburn
    Richard Cockburn, Nov 18, 2004
    #6
  7. Mike Henley

    Skip M Guest

    "Richard Cockburn" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns95A4CDA166945n@130.133.1.4...
    > (Mike Henley) wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >> Okay, I'm *not* really interested in printing at the moment, so let's
    >> leave that aside.
    >>
    >> Have a look at this guy's work http://www.pbase.com/janung
    >> Yes, he definitely was shooting film in 1978, not digital, but I find
    >> it very inspiring. So, how do you mimic b&w photography with a digital
    >> camera?
    >>
    >> Here's what I might do; shoot digital (color JPEG or RAW) with manual
    >> or spot exposure (and an autobracketted-exposure 3-shots won't harm),
    >> no flash, just using natural available light, then use the histogram
    >> in post-processing to adjust contrast and tones?
    >>
    >> Well, what do you do?

    >
    > Technically, there's no such thing as digital B&W. I usually shoot film
    > when I want B&W.
    >
    > --
    > "We are twice armed if we fight with faith." (Plato)
    >
    > -Richard Cockburn


    I'm interested in what you mean by "technically?" The Canon 20D has a b&w
    mode, not desaturated or greyscale, since the images are still RGB when the
    are d/l from the camera. Not arguing, curious...

    --
    Skip Middleton
    http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    Skip M, Nov 18, 2004
    #7
  8. Mike Henley

    Skip M Guest

    "Richard Cockburn" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns95A4DAEB6C5B5n@130.133.1.4...
    > wrote in news::
    >
    >> Digital isn't any more "color" than it is "B&W".

    >
    > That is so true, but I find the "color" results to be more acceptable than
    > "b&w" results. T-Max or Tri-Pan gives me the B&W look I like. My 20D is
    > not
    > capable of that.
    >
    > --
    > "We are twice armed if we fight with faith." (Plato)
    >
    > -Richard Cockburn


    My 20D does ok, as long as I don't print it on an inkjet. But you have to
    be careful of contrast and "filter" settings.

    --
    Skip Middleton
    http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    Skip M, Nov 18, 2004
    #8
  9. Mike Henley

    jarav Guest

    Mike Henley wrote:
    > Okay, I'm *not* really interested in printing at the moment, so let's
    > leave that aside.
    >
    > Have a look at this guy's work http://www.pbase.com/janung
    > Yes, he definitely was shooting film in 1978, not digital, but I find
    > it very inspiring. So, how do you mimic b&w photography with a digital
    > camera?
    >
    > Here's what I might do; shoot digital (color JPEG or RAW) with manual
    > or spot exposure (and an autobracketted-exposure 3-shots won't harm),
    > no flash, just using natural available light, then use the histogram
    > in post-processing to adjust contrast and tones?
    >
    > Well, what do you do?


    Here's an excellent article:
    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/b-w_better.shtml
    jarav, Nov 18, 2004
    #9
  10. Mike Henley

    j Guest

    Having messed about with digital B&W a lot I have found that I get good
    results filtering in Photoshop but I did not get really great results until
    I switch to true pigment B&W inks for my Epson printer. No comparison to
    the "normal" inks.

    Ron

    "Mike Henley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Okay, I'm *not* really interested in printing at the moment, so let's
    > leave that aside.
    >
    > Have a look at this guy's work http://www.pbase.com/janung
    > Yes, he definitely was shooting film in 1978, not digital, but I find
    > it very inspiring. So, how do you mimic b&w photography with a digital
    > camera?
    >
    > Here's what I might do; shoot digital (color JPEG or RAW) with manual
    > or spot exposure (and an autobracketted-exposure 3-shots won't harm),
    > no flash, just using natural available light, then use the histogram
    > in post-processing to adjust contrast and tones?
    >
    > Well, what do you do?
    j, Nov 18, 2004
    #10
  11. Mike Henley

    bob Guest

    jarav <> wrote in news:cnhmub$1q7s$:

    > Here's an excellent article:
    > http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/b-w_better.shtml
    >


    It is excellent. Although the article doesn't touch on it, the channel
    mixer works in CMYK mode too.

    There are photoshop plugins you can buy that will more or less mimic the
    color response of various different B&W films too.

    Bob
    bob, Nov 18, 2004
    #11
  12. Mike Henley

    Frank ess Guest

    bob wrote:
    > jarav <> wrote in news:cnhmub$1q7s$:
    >
    >> Here's an excellent article:
    >> http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/b-w_better.shtml
    >>

    >
    > It is excellent. Although the article doesn't touch on it, the channel
    > mixer works in CMYK mode too.
    >
    > There are photoshop plugins you can buy that will more or less mimic
    > the color response of various different B&W films too.
    >
    > Bob


    At another point on the spectrum, so to speak, you got your (free when I
    got them, dono about now) filter-fakers: FotoSIM, that offers a
    drop-down menu where you can select from a range of Wratten/Kodak
    filters by number, to apply to your image, and BWorks, that lists
    numerous flavors of "Black and white" you can select. Both from
    http://www.mediachance.com/ .
    Frank ess, Nov 18, 2004
    #12
  13. Mike Henley

    Mike Henley Guest

    "Skip M" <> wrote in message news:<YJUmd.147097$hj.6959@fed1read07>...
    >
    > I'm interested in what you mean by "technically?" The Canon 20D has a b&w
    > mode, not desaturated or greyscale, since the images are still RGB when the
    > are d/l from the camera. Not arguing, curious...


    The in-camera b&w mode would probably depend on the type of camera and
    its qulities be specific, but let's just talk in general, would it be
    better to capture images with the in-camera b&w mode, or to just take
    color images that are later processed in, say, PSP?

    One obvious advantage of the latter is that one has the option of
    staying with color or converting to b&w, whereas the opposite is not
    true. Also, would doing it on the computer, with persumably better
    hardware and software than the little in-camera processor, be better?

    Is there any specialised software that does a good job at this?
    Mike Henley, Nov 18, 2004
    #13
  14. Mike Henley

    Skip M Guest

    "Mike Henley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Skip M" <> wrote in message
    > news:<YJUmd.147097$hj.6959@fed1read07>...
    >>
    >> I'm interested in what you mean by "technically?" The Canon 20D has a
    >> b&w
    >> mode, not desaturated or greyscale, since the images are still RGB when
    >> the
    >> are d/l from the camera. Not arguing, curious...

    >
    > The in-camera b&w mode would probably depend on the type of camera and
    > its qulities be specific, but let's just talk in general, would it be
    > better to capture images with the in-camera b&w mode, or to just take
    > color images that are later processed in, say, PSP?
    >
    > One obvious advantage of the latter is that one has the option of
    > staying with color or converting to b&w, whereas the opposite is not
    > true. Also, would doing it on the computer, with persumably better
    > hardware and software than the little in-camera processor, be better?
    >
    > Is there any specialised software that does a good job at this?


    With the 20D, I have the option of shooting RAW+JPEG, so I can have a color
    file and a b&w file, too. (RAW=color, JPEG=b&w) So that's not an issue.
    Also, when I shot/shoot film, primarily, I use b&w film, so a lack of a
    color file isn't a problem, I don't miss what I didn't want, anyway. And,
    frankly, I've gotten results with the 20D in b&w mode that I like as well as
    anything I got with considerable time spent twiddling with PShop.
    Here are two that claim to do a good job of converting.

    http://www.mediachance.com/digicam/bworks.htm

    http://www.silveroxide.com/

    --
    Skip Middleton
    http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    Skip M, Nov 18, 2004
    #14
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