beginner's question..

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Scott Needham, Sep 5, 2005.

  1. Folk:

    When networked (cable access, wireless), I understand that the router
    is usually (always?) protected by anti-virus -hack -spam software, so
    do individual 'puters need their own anti-software as well? what is
    the relationship between the software on the router and that on the
    individual 'puters? how do the different installations interact?
    --

    Regards and Happy Trails,

    Scott Needham
    Boulder, Colorado, USA
     
    Scott Needham, Sep 5, 2005
    #1
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  2. Scott Needham

    Malke Guest

    Scott Needham wrote:

    > Folk:
    >
    > When networked (cable access, wireless), I understand that the router
    > is usually (always?) protected by anti-virus -hack -spam software, so
    > do individual 'puters need their own anti-software as well? what is
    > the relationship between the software on the router and that on the
    > individual 'puters? how do the different installations interact?


    If you are talking about a garden-variety consumer-level router
    (Linksys, D-Link, Netgear, etc.) it does not have any antivirus
    software on it. It works as a simple firewall by using NAT (Network
    Address Translation) and you can block ports with it. There is no
    "anti-virus-hack-spam" software on one of these routers. If you have a
    different kind of router, post back with what it is.

    All Windows machines that are connected to any kind of network
    (Internet, local area network with other machines with Internet access
    and/or which can have files put on them from outside - floppies, cd,
    etc.) must have installed a current version antivirus program. This av
    should be full-featured, version not earlier than 2004, and the virus
    definitions subscription must be current and definitions kept updated.
    IMO, all Windows machines should also have a software firewall in this
    scenario. If you have XPSP2, the Windows Firewall is fine. If you have
    older machines running Win9x/ME, they should have third-party firewalls
    on them.

    Malke
    --
    Elephant Boy Computers
    www.elephantboycomputers.com
    "Don't Panic!"
    MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
     
    Malke, Sep 5, 2005
    #2
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  3. No. Consumer routers are usually not protected by any anti-virus (etc.)
    software and do not offer any anti-virus protection. Their main benefit
    comes from their use of NAT, which tends to prevent incoming connections,
    which protects against worms. However, in some cases one needs to allow
    incoming connections (e.g., file server, video conferences, etc.) and most
    routers support something called UPnP, which allows applications to ask a
    router to forward incoming connections on particular ports to them. You can
    also set this manually so that incoming connections on particular ports are
    sent to particular computers on your network. In these cases, the
    protection offered by your router is next to none on those ports and you
    have to hope that the computers that are receiving the incoming connections
    are not susceptible to buffer overflow (etc.) attacks on those ports.

    Therefore, when using a router, you will be reasonably well-protected
    against worms as long as you do not turn on UPnP or some other kind of port
    forwarding. However, some network games and applications need to allow
    incoming connections, and so you may need to turn on UPnP for them to
    operate properly and hope that they are not vulnerable to attacks on the
    ports they are opening. Anti-spam protection may be done by your ISP and by
    software on your computer (the best anti-spam protection is to never reply
    to spam and to keep your e-mail address off the internet; i.e., change your
    e-mail address slightly when posting in newsgroups so that a person can
    figure it out but a computer cannot). Anti-virus protection should be done
    on your computer because your ISP can scan e-mail attachments but cannot
    scan everything sent to your computer over a network. Be sure to update
    anti-virus software nightly.

    Finally, if you get a wireless router, configure it using a wired
    connection, change the default password, and use WPA encryption for wireless
    communications.

    -Yves

    "Scott Needham" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Folk:
    >
    > When networked (cable access, wireless), I understand that the router
    > is usually (always?) protected by anti-virus -hack -spam software, so
    > do individual 'puters need their own anti-software as well? what is
    > the relationship between the software on the router and that on the
    > individual 'puters? how do the different installations interact?
    > --
    >
    > Regards and Happy Trails,
    >
    > Scott Needham
    > Boulder, Colorado, USA
    >
     
    Yves Konigshofer, Sep 5, 2005
    #3
  4. Part of the confusion in this area results from a fundamental change in
    network security theory. You will have no trouble finding articles in which
    the only firewall on the network is a perimeter firewall and individual
    machine firewalls are either not recommended or actively discouraged. Today
    it is increasingly recommended that you maintain both a perimeter firewall
    and individual host firewalls. The reason for the change in approach is
    almost entirely due to the proliferation of high speed Internet connections
    and the attendent increase in spyware/malware attacks. For a pretty good
    summary - See:

    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/topics/networksecurity/firewall.ms
    px

    Doug Sherman
    MCSE, MCSA, MCP+I, MVP

    "Scott Needham" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Folk:
    >
    > When networked (cable access, wireless), I understand that the router
    > is usually (always?) protected by anti-virus -hack -spam software, so
    > do individual 'puters need their own anti-software as well? what is
    > the relationship between the software on the router and that on the
    > individual 'puters? how do the different installations interact?
    > --
    >
    > Regards and Happy Trails,
    >
    > Scott Needham
    > Boulder, Colorado, USA
    >
     
    Doug Sherman [MVP], Sep 5, 2005
    #4
  5. Scott Needham

    Jack Guest

    Hi
    Entry Level Cable/DSL Router’s NAT Firewall provides partial security
    against “Junk” that might get into your system via Internet connection.

    How Come? See here for simple explanation:
    http://www.ezlan.net/firewall.html

    Basic Protection of a Computer/Network connected to the Internet should
    consist of:

    1. Router’s NAT Firewall
    2. Software Firewall
    3. Antivirus Program
    4. AntiSpyware program.
    You can buy a comprehensive Security suites. However since the issue is so
    important if you can not effort such a protection there are Free programs
    that work as well as the commercial suites:
    http://www.ezlan.net/security.html
    Jack (MVP-Networking).



    "Doug Sherman [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Part of the confusion in this area results from a fundamental change in
    > network security theory. You will have no trouble finding articles in

    which
    > the only firewall on the network is a perimeter firewall and individual
    > machine firewalls are either not recommended or actively discouraged.

    Today
    > it is increasingly recommended that you maintain both a perimeter firewall
    > and individual host firewalls. The reason for the change in approach is
    > almost entirely due to the proliferation of high speed Internet

    connections
    > and the attendent increase in spyware/malware attacks. For a pretty good
    > summary - See:
    >
    >

    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/topics/networksecurity/firewall.ms
    > px
    >
    > Doug Sherman
    > MCSE, MCSA, MCP+I, MVP
    >
    > "Scott Needham" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Folk:
    > >
    > > When networked (cable access, wireless), I understand that the router
    > > is usually (always?) protected by anti-virus -hack -spam software, so
    > > do individual 'puters need their own anti-software as well? what is
    > > the relationship between the software on the router and that on the
    > > individual 'puters? how do the different installations interact?
    > > --
    > >
    > > Regards and Happy Trails,
    > >
    > > Scott Needham
    > > Boulder, Colorado, USA
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Jack, Sep 6, 2005
    #5
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