Battery woes

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Daytona, Jun 10, 2007.

  1. Daytona

    Daytona Guest

    My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
    least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
    can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
    which is the best type of battery to use ?

    I've got a cheap 2 hour fast charger and I'm wondering whether that
    could be part of the problem, as before I used to have a trickle
    charger. I bought cheap stuff 2 years ago because I thought that NiCd
    was established technology and so price didn't make much difference to
    quality.

    I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
    LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
    information on the battery condition.

    I don't really understand what I need, so any thoughts would be
    appreciated :)

    Daytona
     
    Daytona, Jun 10, 2007
    #1
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  2. Daytona

    Daytona Guest

    On 10 Jun, 22:05, Daytona <> wrote:

    >Since I don't use my camera that often,
    >which is the best type of battery to use ?


    The camera is a basic point and shoot Canon A70.
     
    Daytona, Jun 10, 2007
    #2
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  3. Daytona

    cassia Guest

    On Jun 10, 3:07 pm, Daytona <> wrote:
    > On 10 Jun, 22:05, Daytona <> wrote:
    >
    > >Since I don't use my camera that often,
    > >which is the best type of battery to use ?

    >
    > The camera is a basic point and shoot Canon A70.


    These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
    Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
    and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
    reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
    ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.
     
    cassia, Jun 10, 2007
    #3
  4. Daytona

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Daytona wrote:
    > My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
    > least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
    > can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
    > which is the best type of battery to use ?
    >
    > I've got a cheap 2 hour fast charger and I'm wondering whether that
    > could be part of the problem, as before I used to have a trickle
    > charger. I bought cheap stuff 2 years ago because I thought that NiCd
    > was established technology and so price didn't make much difference to
    > quality.
    >
    > I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
    > LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
    > information on the battery condition.
    >
    > I don't really understand what I need, so any thoughts would be
    > appreciated :)
    >
    > Daytona
    >

    Since you rarely use your camera, I suggest investing in the Eneloop
    NIMH batteries. They should perform well for your needs.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jun 11, 2007
    #4
  5. Daytona

    Ron Hunter Guest

    cassia wrote:
    > On Jun 10, 3:07 pm, Daytona <> wrote:
    >> On 10 Jun, 22:05, Daytona <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Since I don't use my camera that often,
    >>> which is the best type of battery to use ?

    >> The camera is a basic point and shoot Canon A70.

    >
    > These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
    > Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
    > and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
    > reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
    > ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.
    >

    I totally disagree. I like the maximum options for source, and type,
    and for that, AA batteries can't be beat.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jun 11, 2007
    #5
  6. Daytona

    Daytona Guest

    On 10 Jun, 22:28, cassia <> wrote:

    > These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
    > Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
    > and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
    > reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
    > ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.


    Yes they're AA, I've just checked and the camera can take NiMH, but I
    don't know about lithium - are they better ?

    Daytona
     
    Daytona, Jun 11, 2007
    #6
  7. Daytona

    ransley Guest

    On Jun 10, 4:59 pm, Daytona <> wrote:
    > On 10 Jun, 22:28, cassia <> wrote:
    >
    > > These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
    > > Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
    > > and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
    > > reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
    > > ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.

    >
    > Yes they're AA, I've just checked and the camera can take NiMH, but I
    > don't know about lithium - are they better ?
    >
    > Daytona


    Ive shot maybe 7000 photos with 3 sets of energiser Nimh, they are
    still good for thousands more, Sanyo, Panasonic, Energiser and
    Duracell are trusted brands. Get a good charger to get the most out of
    them
     
    ransley, Jun 11, 2007
    #7
  8. Daytona

    ray Guest

    On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 14:05:02 -0700, Daytona wrote:

    > My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
    > least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
    > can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
    > which is the best type of battery to use ?
    >
    > I've got a cheap 2 hour fast charger and I'm wondering whether that
    > could be part of the problem, as before I used to have a trickle
    > charger. I bought cheap stuff 2 years ago because I thought that NiCd
    > was established technology and so price didn't make much difference to
    > quality.
    >
    > I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
    > LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
    > information on the battery condition.
    >
    > I don't really understand what I need, so any thoughts would be
    > appreciated :)
    >
    > Daytona


    The new nihm's from Sanyo (Enerloop) and RayOvac (hybrid) are said to have
    solved the 'shelf life' problem. I would suggest you also look at Lithium
    (non-rechargeable) batteries as a solution. Since you indicate that you
    use it sparingly, this would seem to be a good answer, though the
    batteries are somewhat expensive, they last a long time and have excellent
    power density (i.e. lots of shots). nicd's are basically not a good
    solution for digital photography.
     
    ray, Jun 11, 2007
    #8
  9. Daytona

    Morton Guest

    Daytona wrote:
    > On 10 Jun, 22:28, cassia <> wrote:
    >
    >> These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
    >> Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
    >> and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
    >> reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
    >> ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.

    >
    > Yes they're AA, I've just checked and the camera can take NiMH, but I
    > don't know about lithium - are they better ?
    >
    > Daytona
    >


    Be careful with Lithium AA batteries. They are capable of a high current
    surge that can damage your electronic circuits, unless your owner's
    manual specifically says that Lithium AAs are OK.
    Morton
     
    Morton, Jun 11, 2007
    #9
  10. Daytona

    Mick Harris Guest

    "Daytona" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
    > least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
    > can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
    > which is the best type of battery to use ?
    >



    Yep, gotta agree with Ron & Ray, The Eneloop batteries by Sanyo will be
    ideal for someone who doesn't use their camera very often, as they won't
    slowly drain away like normal batteries.
    I have used the Eneloop AA's in my flash (Speedlite 550EX) for a while now
    and they are just great!
    I have 2 sets of 4 so I always have a spare fully charged set, and I don't
    seem to change sets nearly half as much as I used to with normal batteries,
    but the real beauty is that when I do change over to the other set, I know
    that it will be at almost maximum charge as they will hold their charge upto
    around 1 year, so they say.
    Gone are the times when I reached for a charged set of batteries and they
    were nearly already exhausted because they had drained away while they sat
    in my kit bag for a few weeks :)
    They are more expensive for the initial layout, but well worth it IMHO.
    Have a read about them here - http://www.eneloop.info/home_en.html
    cheers
    Mick
     
    Mick Harris, Jun 11, 2007
    #10
  11. Daytona

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Daytona wrote:
    > On 10 Jun, 22:28, cassia <> wrote:
    >
    >> These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
    >> Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
    >> and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
    >> reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
    >> ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.

    >
    > Yes they're AA, I've just checked and the camera can take NiMH, but I
    > don't know about lithium - are they better ?
    >
    > Daytona
    >

    There are lithium AA batteries, and there are litiium ion batteries.
    The lithium ion batteries are a nominal 3.7 volts, and are not suitable
    for use in cameras made for AA batteries, but there are lithium
    disposables which are, and they work very will in most equipment. There
    are advantages to lithium ion batteries, such as low weight, and long
    use life, and slow self-discharge rates, cold weather performance, etc.,
    but availability is not good since most of them are proprietary.
    I have lithium ion batteries in my cell phone, and my GPS, and they work
    great in those applications, but I prefer AA batteries for my cameras as
    the battery flexibility and choices are important in this application.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jun 11, 2007
    #11
  12. Daytona

    Ron Hunter Guest

    ray wrote:
    > On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 14:05:02 -0700, Daytona wrote:
    >
    >> My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
    >> least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
    >> can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
    >> which is the best type of battery to use ?
    >>
    >> I've got a cheap 2 hour fast charger and I'm wondering whether that
    >> could be part of the problem, as before I used to have a trickle
    >> charger. I bought cheap stuff 2 years ago because I thought that NiCd
    >> was established technology and so price didn't make much difference to
    >> quality.
    >>
    >> I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
    >> LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
    >> information on the battery condition.
    >>
    >> I don't really understand what I need, so any thoughts would be
    >> appreciated :)
    >>
    >> Daytona

    >
    > The new nihm's from Sanyo (Enerloop) and RayOvac (hybrid) are said to have
    > solved the 'shelf life' problem. I would suggest you also look at Lithium
    > (non-rechargeable) batteries as a solution. Since you indicate that you
    > use it sparingly, this would seem to be a good answer, though the
    > batteries are somewhat expensive, they last a long time and have excellent
    > power density (i.e. lots of shots). nicd's are basically not a good
    > solution for digital photography.
    >

    My wife's camera has disposable lithium batteries installed. They have
    been the camera since Christmas, and we have taken the camera on two
    trips since then, and taken a couple of hundred pictures, with the LCD
    on all the time, and reviewed them often, and it continues to take
    pictures. When these batteries die, I will install the Eneloop
    batteries and see how they work in her sporadically used camera.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jun 11, 2007
    #12
  13. Daytona

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Morton wrote:
    > Daytona wrote:
    >> On 10 Jun, 22:28, cassia <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
    >>> Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
    >>> and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
    >>> reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
    >>> ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.

    >>
    >> Yes they're AA, I've just checked and the camera can take NiMH, but I
    >> don't know about lithium - are they better ?
    >>
    >> Daytona
    >>

    >
    > Be careful with Lithium AA batteries. They are capable of a high current
    > surge that can damage your electronic circuits, unless your owner's
    > manual specifically says that Lithium AAs are OK.
    > Morton

    Yes, and DON'T drop them into a pocket with your keys, coins, etc. Even
    'dead' ones can cause a rather painful problem should they become
    'shorted' in a pocket!
    Been there, done that!
     
    Ron Hunter, Jun 11, 2007
    #13
  14. Daytona

    ASAAR Guest

    On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 14:05:02 -0700, Daytona wrote:

    > My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
    > least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
    > can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
    > which is the best type of battery to use ?
    >
    > I've got a cheap 2 hour fast charger and I'm wondering whether that
    > could be part of the problem, as before I used to have a trickle
    > charger. I bought cheap stuff 2 years ago because I thought that NiCd
    > was established technology and so price didn't make much difference to
    > quality.
    >
    > I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
    > LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
    > information on the battery condition.


    You really shouldn't use AA NiCd batteries. Even back when Canon
    introduced the A70 in 2003, NiMH AA cells were probably recommended.
    Today's NiMH batteries should be good for at least double and
    possibly 3 times the number of shots that NiCd batteries can
    manage. Check the mAh rating, which should be printed in small type
    on the NiCD case. For reference, you should be able to buy NiMH
    batteries virtually everywhere that have capacities from 2500 to
    2700mAh. The last time I checked, NiCD batteries had capacities of
    from 900 to 1000 mAh.

    If your charger is old enough, it might be compatible with NiCd
    batteries. Some of the earlier "smart" chargers could automatically
    detect the difference between NiCD and NiMH, but others needed for
    the user to use a switch to tell the charger which type was being
    charged. Many current chargers assume that only NiMH batteries will
    be charged, and if they're not smart enough to detect NiCd
    batteries, might charge them at a high enough rate to cause
    overheating damage. BTW, I have an old Radio Shack NiCD "Fast
    Charger", and it took 6 hours to charge the NiCds. If your 2 hour
    charger detected NiCd batteries, to charge them safely it should
    either slow the charge rate so as to take about 6 hours to charge
    them, or if it assumed that the NiCd batteries could take a fast
    charge, it would only need about 40 minutes to fully charge them,
    not two full hours. If it really charged the NiCD batteries for 2
    hours at the NiMH charge rate, they've probably been cooked to
    death, which would explain why the provided such poor performance
    after only 10 charge cycles. NiCd and NiMH batteries should be good
    for many hundreds of charge cycles if they're used and charged
    properly.

    According to DPReview's test of the A70, using the low capacity
    NiMH batteries that were commonly available back in 2003 (1600mAh)
    they were able to get 515 shots using their own custom test
    procedure. This consisted of taking 4 shots without using the
    flash, waiting two minutes, taking one shot using the flash, waiting
    another minute, and repeating. I you use 2,700 mAh NiMH cells, that
    number should rise to about 850 shots per charge. Canon's A###
    series cameras are/were known to be efficient, and since you don't
    use the camera very often, why not try using plain old alkaline AA
    batteries. They won't last as long as NiMH, but in the A70 they
    should be good for close to 400 shots using the same procedure
    DPReview used. If most of your shots use the flash, alkalines might
    struggle to reach 100 shots, but if all of your shots are taken
    outdoors, especially if you use the viewfinder instead of the LCD,
    alkalines might easily be good for more than 600 shots per set.

    The LaCrosse is a nice charger, but it's really overkill for the
    A70, even if you switch to using NiMH batteries. And rechargeable
    batteries should *not* be needed unless you use the flash quite
    often. If that's the case, almost any halfway decent "smart"
    charger should be good enough, if it has independent charge circuits
    for each cell. The chargers to avoid are the ones that only can
    charge two or four cells at a time.

    My Fuji camera is similar to your A70, and when I got it two 1/2
    years ago used to travel with 2 or 3 sets of charged NiMH batteries.
    I don't any more, as it's able to take many hundreds of shots over
    several days without needing to replace the first set of batteries
    with a fresh set. Now I either bring no backup battery sets if I
    don't think I'll take more than 200 shots, but if I think that I
    might take more than 400, I'll bring along either one additional set
    of charged NiMH batteries or a set of alkalines. If you do use the
    flash a lot, the Eneloop type NiMH batteries mentioned by in several
    other replies would be a good choice since they don't lose much of
    their charge if the camera sits in a drawer for many month between
    uses. If you don't use the flash much, alkalines (and even the
    fairly expensive Lithium AA batteries) would probably be the most
    convenient, cost effective solution for you.

    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canona70/page9.asp
     
    ASAAR, Jun 11, 2007
    #14
  15. On Jun 10, 10:05 pm, Daytona <> wrote:
    > My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
    > least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
    > can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
    > which is the best type of battery to use ?
    >
    > I've got a cheap 2 hour fast charger and I'm wondering whether that
    > could be part of the problem, as before I used to have a trickle
    > charger. I bought cheap stuff 2 years ago because I thought that NiCd
    > was established technology and so price didn't make much difference to
    > quality.
    >
    > I was looking at converting to NiMH and using the La Crosse BC 900 /
    > LaCrosse RS900 / Technoline iCharger as at least it gives some
    > information on the battery condition.
    >
    > I don't really understand what I need, so any thoughts would be
    > appreciated :)
    >
    > Daytona


    You could try charging your cells one at a time - if a single cell has
    run out further than the others, the charger may be switching off
    before that cell finishes charging because one of the others has
    reached full charge.
     
    Al, Cambridge, UK, Jun 11, 2007
    #15
  16. Daytona

    Dave Cohen Guest

    Mick Harris wrote:
    > "Daytona" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> My 4 cheap nicad battaries have failed after only about 10 cycles, at
    >> least, the power output on 1 is well down and the net result is that I
    >> can only manage 2 pictures. Since I don't use my camera that often,
    >> which is the best type of battery to use ?
    >>

    >
    >
    > Yep, gotta agree with Ron & Ray, The Eneloop batteries by Sanyo will be
    > ideal for someone who doesn't use their camera very often, as they won't
    > slowly drain away like normal batteries.
    > I have used the Eneloop AA's in my flash (Speedlite 550EX) for a while now
    > and they are just great!
    > I have 2 sets of 4 so I always have a spare fully charged set, and I don't
    > seem to change sets nearly half as much as I used to with normal batteries,
    > but the real beauty is that when I do change over to the other set, I know
    > that it will be at almost maximum charge as they will hold their charge upto
    > around 1 year, so they say.
    > Gone are the times when I reached for a charged set of batteries and they
    > were nearly already exhausted because they had drained away while they sat
    > in my kit bag for a few weeks :)
    > They are more expensive for the initial layout, but well worth it IMHO.
    > Have a read about them here - http://www.eneloop.info/home_en.html
    > cheers
    > Mick
    >
    >

    They are more expensive from some places. I've seen ridiculous prices on
    the Internet even before mailing costs.
    Got mine at Ritz retail. $12 per set of 4. This was last September but
    price hasn't changed. Walmart have Hybrid's at lower cost, plus I
    noticed a Kodak brand claiming low discharge.
    They do (Eneloop) perform very well, got 652 shots prior to charging.
    Charged last November for first (and only time). Still shooting on that
    charge, currently 100 shots.
    Dave Cohen
     
    Dave Cohen, Jun 11, 2007
    #16
  17. Daytona

    Daytona Guest

    On 11 Jun, 01:05, ransley <> wrote:

    >Get a good charger to get the most out of
    > them


    Thanks everyone for all the replies !

    How do I know what is and what isn't a good charger ? I was thinking
    of getting the LaCrosse charger because everyone seems to think that
    it's good and since hopefully it's going to last a long time, I don't
    mind the relatively high price (£38/$74).

    I'm in the UK, so I don't know whether some of the batteries mentioned
    are available, but at least I know the kind of thing to look for. Am I
    correct in thinking that generally, Sanyo and Sanyo rebranded
    batteries are good ?

    Daytona
     
    Daytona, Jun 11, 2007
    #17
  18. Daytona

    John Bean Guest

    On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 11:31:12 -0700, Daytona
    <> wrote:

    >On 11 Jun, 01:05, ransley <> wrote:
    >
    >How do I know what is and what isn't a good charger ? I was thinking
    >of getting the LaCrosse charger because everyone seems to think that
    >it's good and since hopefully it's going to last a long time, I don't
    >mind the relatively high price (£38/$74).


    Any "smart" charger that monitors the individual cells will
    be fine. I use the Maha C-401FS and can recommend it without
    hesitation. Wonderful little charger, runs cool as well.

    >I'm in the UK, so I don't know whether some of the batteries mentioned
    >are available


    Buy Uniross Hybrios, you won't be disappointed. You can buy
    them in many outlets, even places like Maplins.


    --
    John Bean
     
    John Bean, Jun 11, 2007
    #18
  19. In article <>,
    says...
    > On Jun 10, 3:07 pm, Daytona <> wrote:
    > > On 10 Jun, 22:05, Daytona <> wrote:
    > >
    > > >Since I don't use my camera that often,
    > > >which is the best type of battery to use ?

    > >
    > > The camera is a basic point and shoot Canon A70.

    >
    > These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
    > Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
    > and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
    > reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
    > ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.
    >
    >

    In my experience, totally wrong!
    Rechargeable AA NimH batteries are fantastic as to life in the camera
    and cost.
     
    Irwin Peckinloomer, Jun 12, 2007
    #19
  20. In article <>,
    says...
    > On 10 Jun, 22:28, cassia <> wrote:
    >
    > > These are just AA right? So far, I've had the BEST experience with the
    > > Duracell Ultra Digital batteries. I use them in my flash (the SB800)
    > > and the recycle time and life has been dramatically better. For future
    > > reference, never buy a camera that takes anything other that a lithium
    > > ion battery; you'll be much happier. Good luck.

    >
    > Yes they're AA, I've just checked and the camera can take NiMH, but I
    > don't know about lithium - are they better ?
    >
    > Daytona
    >
    >

    Just get some cheap NinH rechargeables, you'll love them
     
    Irwin Peckinloomer, Jun 12, 2007
    #20
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