Basic photo question

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by MB_, Dec 24, 2004.

  1. MB_

    MB_ Guest

    I am a relative newbie, enjoying my Canon A75.

    However, one problem I seem to have with pictures:

    When taking a picture of a subject(s), if there is light shining towards me
    from behind the subject (perhaps the subject is directly in front of --- or
    even obliquely near --- a window with light coming in), the subject(s) end
    up coming out way too dark. This occurs with people. Also, the other day we
    had some beautiful roses on a mantel in front of a window. The roses hardly
    showed up when I took the picture.

    So far, I've only used the automatic setting. I'm really not knowledgeable
    about the more technical aspects of taking pictures.

    So, my obvious question: is there some other (manual) setting I should try
    when taking such pictures.

    Mel
     
    MB_, Dec 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. MB_

    Marvin Guest

    MB_ wrote:
    > I am a relative newbie, enjoying my Canon A75.
    >
    > However, one problem I seem to have with pictures:
    >
    > When taking a picture of a subject(s), if there is light shining towards me
    > from behind the subject (perhaps the subject is directly in front of --- or
    > even obliquely near --- a window with light coming in), the subject(s) end
    > up coming out way too dark. This occurs with people. Also, the other day we
    > had some beautiful roses on a mantel in front of a window. The roses hardly
    > showed up when I took the picture.
    >
    > So far, I've only used the automatic setting. I'm really not knowledgeable
    > about the more technical aspects of taking pictures.
    >
    > So, my obvious question: is there some other (manual) setting I should try
    > when taking such pictures.
    >
    > Mel
    >


    If you can't avoid the background light, either use a fill flash or set
    the exposure specifically on the subject. Your manual should tell you
    how to do that. (When in doubt, read the directions.)
     
    Marvin, Dec 24, 2004
    #2
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  3. "MB_" <> wrote in message
    news:paZyd.26338$...
    >I am a relative newbie, enjoying my Canon A75.
    >
    > However, one problem I seem to have with pictures:
    >
    > When taking a picture of a subject(s), if there is light shining towards
    > me from behind the subject (perhaps the subject is directly in front
    > of --- or even obliquely near --- a window with light coming in), the
    > subject(s) end up coming out way too dark. This occurs with people. Also,
    > the other day we had some beautiful roses on a mantel in front of a
    > window. The roses hardly showed up when I took the picture.
    >
    > So far, I've only used the automatic setting. I'm really not knowledgeable
    > about the more technical aspects of taking pictures.
    >
    > So, my obvious question: is there some other (manual) setting I should
    > try when taking such pictures.
    >


    With backlighting, you will need to increase the exposure conmpenstion (up
    to +2EV), use fill flash, or you might find that spot metering on the
    subject rather than matrix or field metering will give proper exposure to
    the subject.

    HMc
     
    Howard McCollister, Dec 24, 2004
    #3
  4. MB_ wrote:
    > I am a relative newbie, enjoying my Canon A75.
    >
    > However, one problem I seem to have with pictures:
    >
    > When taking a picture of a subject(s), if there is light shining
    > towards me from behind the subject (perhaps the subject is directly
    > in front of --- or even obliquely near --- a window with light coming
    > in), the subject(s) end up coming out way too dark. This occurs with
    > people. Also, the other day we had some beautiful roses on a mantel
    > in front of a window. The roses hardly showed up when I took the
    > picture.
    > So far, I've only used the automatic setting. I'm really not
    > knowledgeable about the more technical aspects of taking pictures.
    >
    > So, my obvious question: is there some other (manual) setting I
    > should try when taking such pictures.
    >
    > Mel


    Since there are many ways of addressing this issue (it is called back
    lighting) I suggest you start with your camera's owners manual. Look up back
    lighting or exposure and see what it suggest based on the capabilities of
    the camera. Sorry I don't know what that specific camera can do.

    BTW the answers already suggested are good.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
     
    Joseph Meehan, Dec 24, 2004
    #4
  5. MB_

    Markeau Guest

    If it's like my Canon S400, set it to Manual then half-press the
    shutter release button and have the little green square appear right
    on the subject you want exposed properly then keep the button
    half-pressed and (if necessary) reframe the shot and shoot.

    "MB_" <> wrote in message
    news:paZyd.26338$...
    >I am a relative newbie, enjoying my Canon A75.
    >
    > However, one problem I seem to have with pictures:
    >
    > When taking a picture of a subject(s), if there is light shining
    > towards me from behind the subject (perhaps the subject is directly
    > in front of --- or even obliquely near --- a window with light
    > coming in), the subject(s) end up coming out way too dark. This
    > occurs with people. Also, the other day we had some beautiful roses
    > on a mantel in front of a window. The roses hardly showed up when I
    > took the picture.
    >
    > So far, I've only used the automatic setting. I'm really not
    > knowledgeable about the more technical aspects of taking pictures.
    >
    > So, my obvious question: is there some other (manual) setting I
    > should try when taking such pictures.
    >
    > Mel
    >
    >
     
    Markeau, Dec 24, 2004
    #5
  6. MB_

    MB_ Guest

    Is fill flash the same as "full flash"?

    Also, I can't set the exp. comp. with the mode set at Auto.

    There are so many other modes; I'll have to figure out which one I can use!

    Mel
    "Howard McCollister" <> wrote in message
    news:41cc6e6e$0$23139$...
    >
    > "MB_" <> wrote in message
    > news:paZyd.26338$...
    >>I am a relative newbie, enjoying my Canon A75.
    >>
    >> However, one problem I seem to have with pictures:
    >>
    >> When taking a picture of a subject(s), if there is light shining towards
    >> me from behind the subject (perhaps the subject is directly in front
    >> of --- or even obliquely near --- a window with light coming in), the
    >> subject(s) end up coming out way too dark. This occurs with people. Also,
    >> the other day we had some beautiful roses on a mantel in front of a
    >> window. The roses hardly showed up when I took the picture.
    >>
    >> So far, I've only used the automatic setting. I'm really not
    >> knowledgeable about the more technical aspects of taking pictures.
    >>
    >> So, my obvious question: is there some other (manual) setting I should
    >> try when taking such pictures.
    >>

    >
    > With backlighting, you will need to increase the exposure conmpenstion (up
    > to +2EV), use fill flash, or you might find that spot metering on the
    > subject rather than matrix or field metering will give proper exposure to
    > the subject.
    >
    > HMc
    >
    >
    >
     
    MB_, Dec 24, 2004
    #6
  7. MB_

    Jim Guest

    "MB_" <> wrote in message
    news:jo1zd.26679$...
    > Is fill flash the same as "full flash"?

    No
    Jim
     
    Jim, Dec 24, 2004
    #7
  8. MB_

    Guest

    Other responses give good ideas about exposure compensation, and I
    agree with them.

    However, you may find that one of the advantages of digital is that you
    can do a lot in software afterwards. If you have a good photo editor
    like PS or PSP you can compensate afterwards on selected areas of a
    photo (like a human subject). Not as good as proper exposure in first
    place, but it may rescue what otherwise would be a reject. You'd need
    an editor that allows you to easily and carefully select a region like
    a head and face, and then lighten it. Also sometimes with backlit
    subjects you may want to reduce overall contrast a bit.
     
    , Dec 25, 2004
    #8
  9. MB_

    Marvin Guest

    MB_ wrote:
    > Is fill flash the same as "full flash"?


    The fill flash setting makes the camera fire the flash, even when it
    thinks there is enough light without it. Because the light from the
    flash spreads out, fill flash brightens near objects compared to the
    background.
    >
    > Also, I can't set the exp. comp. with the mode set at Auto.
    >
    > There are so many other modes; I'll have to figure out which one I can use!
    >
    > Mel
    > "Howard McCollister" <> wrote in message
    > news:41cc6e6e$0$23139$...
    >
    >>"MB_" <> wrote in message
    >>news:paZyd.26338$...
    >>
    >>>I am a relative newbie, enjoying my Canon A75.
    >>>
    >>>However, one problem I seem to have with pictures:
    >>>
    >>>When taking a picture of a subject(s), if there is light shining towards
    >>>me from behind the subject (perhaps the subject is directly in front
    >>>of --- or even obliquely near --- a window with light coming in), the
    >>>subject(s) end up coming out way too dark. This occurs with people. Also,
    >>>the other day we had some beautiful roses on a mantel in front of a
    >>>window. The roses hardly showed up when I took the picture.
    >>>
    >>>So far, I've only used the automatic setting. I'm really not
    >>>knowledgeable about the more technical aspects of taking pictures.
    >>>
    >>>So, my obvious question: is there some other (manual) setting I should
    >>>try when taking such pictures.
    >>>

    >>
    >>With backlighting, you will need to increase the exposure conmpenstion (up
    >>to +2EV), use fill flash, or you might find that spot metering on the
    >>subject rather than matrix or field metering will give proper exposure to
    >>the subject.
    >>
    >>HMc
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
     
    Marvin, Dec 25, 2004
    #9
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