Basic calculator query

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by KiwiBrian, Nov 14, 2005.

  1. KiwiBrian

    KiwiBrian Guest

    When using a basic handheld calculator that has a % key, what would be the
    normal key sequence to calculate n+12.5% where n is any number?
     
    KiwiBrian, Nov 14, 2005
    #1
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  2. KiwiBrian

    Chris Hope Guest

    KiwiBrian wrote:

    > When using a basic handheld calculator that has a % key, what would be
    > the normal key sequence to calculate n+12.5% where n is any number?


    On the calculator I have:
    n x 12.5 % + =

    Although personally I would normally do n x 1.125 =

    --
    Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.com
     
    Chris Hope, Nov 14, 2005
    #2
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  3. KiwiBrian

    KiwiBrian Guest

    "Chris Hope" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > KiwiBrian wrote:
    >
    >> When using a basic handheld calculator that has a % key, what would be
    >> the normal key sequence to calculate n+12.5% where n is any number?

    >
    > On the calculator I have:
    > n x 12.5 % + =
    >
    > Although personally I would normally do n x 1.125 =


    Thanks Chris.
    On the program that I am using, ESBCalc, your first sequence produces an
    "Error" display.
    The latest Karenware calculator program doesn't have a % key.
    Unbelievable.....
    It will be interesting to hear from others as well.
    Brian.
     
    KiwiBrian, Nov 14, 2005
    #3
  4. KiwiBrian

    Chris Hope Guest

    KiwiBrian wrote:

    >
    > "Chris Hope" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> KiwiBrian wrote:
    >>
    >>> When using a basic handheld calculator that has a % key, what would
    >>> be the normal key sequence to calculate n+12.5% where n is any
    >>> number?

    >>
    >> On the calculator I have:
    >> n x 12.5 % + =
    >>
    >> Although personally I would normally do n x 1.125 =

    >
    > Thanks Chris.
    > On the program that I am using, ESBCalc, your first sequence produces
    > an "Error" display.
    > The latest Karenware calculator program doesn't have a % key.
    > Unbelievable.....
    > It will be interesting to hear from others as well.
    > Brian.


    It may not like the + = sequence.

    --
    Chris Hope | www.electrictoolbox.com | www.linuxcdmall.com
     
    Chris Hope, Nov 14, 2005
    #4
  5. KiwiBrian

    Shane Guest

    On Tue, 15 Nov 2005 10:45:54 +1300, KiwiBrian wrote:

    > When using a basic handheld calculator that has a % key, what would be the
    > normal key sequence to calculate n+12.5% where n is any number?


    If its GST youre trying to work out
    n/8 + n =
    If youre working out much GST you just paid
    n/9=


    HTH
    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
     
    Shane, Nov 14, 2005
    #5
  6. On Tue, 15 Nov 2005 10:45:54 +1300, KiwiBrian <> wrote
    in <news:dlb0h9$l38$>:

    > When using a basic handheld calculator that has a % key, what would be the
    > normal key sequence to calculate n+12.5% where n is any number?


    Most basically, I think:

    n x 12.5 = / 100 = + =

    [or]

    n x 9 = / 8 =

    [or]

    n x 1.125 =

    --
    Regards,
    Nicolaas.
     
    Nicolaas Hawkins, Nov 15, 2005
    #6
  7. KiwiBrian

    Peter Guest

    KiwiBrian wrote:

    > When using a basic handheld calculator that has a % key, what would be the
    > normal key sequence to calculate n+12.5% where n is any number?

    AFAIK the % key completes the calculation then multiplies the answer by 100.
    There is probably no % key which is similar to a 'sign change' key.
     
    Peter, Nov 15, 2005
    #7
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