bandwidth usage calculator

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Sai, Nov 7, 2003.

  1. Sai

    Sai Guest

    Hi Guys,
    we have a 512 Kbps link from India to UK, the link is 98% loaded all
    the time, we have to calculate a optimal B/W so that there is no
    network clogging, are there any thumb-rules for calculating the
    bandwidth??

    Regards,
    Sai.
     
    Sai, Nov 7, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Sai

    Ivan Ostres Guest

    "Sai" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi Guys,
    > we have a 512 Kbps link from India to UK, the link is 98% loaded all
    > the time, we have to calculate a optimal B/W so that there is no
    > network clogging, are there any thumb-rules for calculating the
    > bandwidth??
    >


    Well, it's hard to do that just like that.. It would be best if you could
    measure traffic comming to your router's ethernet and than you could see how
    much traffic are you consuming. Then you will see how much do you really
    need. If that is too much, use traffic shaping/policing on "unimportant"
    traffic.

    Ivan
     
    Ivan Ostres, Nov 7, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Sai

    Sai Guest

    Hi Ivan,
    I was wondering if i use the rule 60% LAN and 40% WAN traffic is the
    optimal traffic to avoid bottlenecks, since my network B/W utilization
    is aroung 98%, means 58% more is used (causing clogging), is this
    making any sense to you and does this sound logical??????

    Sai.
    "Ivan Ostres" <> wrote in message news:<bofja5$1eg0kq$-berlin.de>...
    > "Sai" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi Guys,
    > > we have a 512 Kbps link from India to UK, the link is 98% loaded all
    > > the time, we have to calculate a optimal B/W so that there is no
    > > network clogging, are there any thumb-rules for calculating the
    > > bandwidth??
    > >

    >
    > Well, it's hard to do that just like that.. It would be best if you could
    > measure traffic comming to your router's ethernet and than you could see how
    > much traffic are you consuming. Then you will see how much do you really
    > need. If that is too much, use traffic shaping/policing on "unimportant"
    > traffic.
    >
    > Ivan
     
    Sai, Nov 7, 2003
    #3
  4. Sai

    Ivan Ostres Guest

    "Sai" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi Ivan,
    > I was wondering if i use the rule 60% LAN and 40% WAN traffic is the
    > optimal traffic to avoid bottlenecks, since my network B/W utilization
    > is aroung 98%, means 58% more is used (causing clogging), is this
    > making any sense to you and does this sound logical??????
    >


    Well, yeah if your WAN is really 98% utilized. But, it might be a 100%
    utilized and showing only 98% (when you have congestion, you won't use all
    bandwidth). So, if you double your WAN bandwidth you could get 98%
    utilization again and you will not solve your problem.

    Ivan
     
    Ivan Ostres, Nov 7, 2003
    #4
  5. Sai

    Sai Guest

    Hi,
    So according there is no way to roughly estimate the bandwidth needed
    for my setup???
    whatever calculations i am making is keeping in mind that anything
    above say 40%(not mandatory) on my WAN is CONGESTION for me.
    u r absolutely correct in saying that since i have only 512 kbps, the
    utlization is showing 98% since there is no room for expansion, so i
    prescribe 1Mb link, so that the utilization might be roughly 768 Kbps
    and I still have 256 Kbps, i.e 1/4 of the bandidth left for any more
    bursty load.
    any suggestions????

    Sai...

    "Ivan Ostres" <> wrote in message news:<bog2se$1dp2nl$-berlin.de>...
    > "Sai" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi Ivan,
    > > I was wondering if i use the rule 60% LAN and 40% WAN traffic is the
    > > optimal traffic to avoid bottlenecks, since my network B/W utilization
    > > is aroung 98%, means 58% more is used (causing clogging), is this
    > > making any sense to you and does this sound logical??????
    > >

    >
    > Well, yeah if your WAN is really 98% utilized. But, it might be a 100%
    > utilized and showing only 98% (when you have congestion, you won't use all
    > bandwidth). So, if you double your WAN bandwidth you could get 98%
    > utilization again and you will not solve your problem.
    >
    > Ivan
     
    Sai, Nov 7, 2003
    #5
  6. Sai

    shope Guest

    "Sai" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi Ivan,
    > I was wondering if i use the rule 60% LAN and 40% WAN traffic is the
    > optimal traffic to avoid bottlenecks, since my network B/W utilization
    > is aroung 98%, means 58% more is used (causing clogging), is this
    > making any sense to you and does this sound logical??????


    No - or probably not.

    Most traffic flows try to adapt to the available bandwidth and congestion
    (or in some cases delay).

    In this case everything will be throttling back due to the discards and
    latency the congestion intorduces.

    Much better to put a sniffer on there and see what is using the bandwidth
    than just blindly increase it and hoping that it sorts the problem. Or look
    at load when the network is at low load, or as the number of users varies.

    You may find you need more bandwidth, but often this sort of level of
    congestion is down to misconfiguration (ie. use a remote mail server instead
    of local), or you need to think about changing the network setup 1st.

    Once you have that then yes - designing for around 50% load in the busy hour
    is a good place to start - but you cant do that until you understand what is
    supposed to go across the link, or you have some sort of baseline.
    >
    > Sai.
    > "Ivan Ostres" <> wrote in message

    news:<bofja5$1eg0kq$-berlin.de>...
    > > "Sai" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Hi Guys,
    > > > we have a 512 Kbps link from India to UK, the link is 98% loaded all
    > > > the time, we have to calculate a optimal B/W so that there is no
    > > > network clogging, are there any thumb-rules for calculating the
    > > > bandwidth??
    > > >

    > >
    > > Well, it's hard to do that just like that.. It would be best if you

    could
    > > measure traffic comming to your router's ethernet and than you could see

    how
    > > much traffic are you consuming. Then you will see how much do you really
    > > need. If that is too much, use traffic shaping/policing on "unimportant"
    > > traffic.
    > >
    > > Ivan

    --
    Regards

    Stephen Hope - remove xx from email to reply
     
    shope, Nov 7, 2003
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Paul McLaren
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    3,810
    Paul McLaren
    Jul 17, 2003
  2. Didier

    limiting http bandwidth usage

    Didier, Jan 23, 2004, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    2,676
    Harri Suomalainen
    Jan 26, 2004
  3. Max Quordlepleen

    Monitoring bandwidth usage on dial-up?

    Max Quordlepleen, Nov 9, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    758
    Max Quordlepleen
    Nov 9, 2003
  4. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?brush-head=A9?=

    VoIPCheap Bandwidth Usage

    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?brush-head=A9?=, Aug 19, 2005, in forum: UK VOIP
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    993
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?brush-head=A9?=
    Aug 20, 2005
  5. Russell Smithies

    Xtra JetStream usage calculator is misleading

    Russell Smithies, Sep 29, 2003, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    549
    Biggles
    Sep 29, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page