bandwidth throughput ping times?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by g, Nov 12, 2003.

  1. g

    g Guest

    Hi
    I was wondering if someone could point me to a faq or explain to me a few
    things.

    If I have a 10mbs network, and only two computers on it, I should be able
    to pull down 10megabits per second from one to the other, theoretically, I
    understand the software on each computer will make a difference.
    If i have a ping time of 10ms that means it took 10 ms to return, if this
    spikes up to 100ms it took 100ms to return. How can i find what my
    transfer should allow in the real world.


    I am confused.
    thanks for any help
     
    g, Nov 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. In article <>, g <> wrote:
    :I was wondering if someone could point me to a faq or explain to me a few
    :things.

    :If I have a 10mbs network, and only two computers on it, I should be able
    :to pull down 10megabits per second from one to the other, theoretically, I
    :understand the software on each computer will make a difference.

    No, that's not correct theory.

    There is no 10 Mbps full-duplex standard, so 10 Mbps would normally
    be half-duplex, with send and receive trying to take place on the
    same wire. Every time the second machine tries to reply to the first,
    the first has to stop sending teporarily.

    Even if you were using one-way transfers (such as UDP), there are
    overheads equivilent to 20 bytes per packet that are not usually
    realized -- the preamble (8 bytes) and the intra-packet gap (12 bytes).
    Then there's the factor that each IP packet has the overhead of source
    and destination MAC addresses and IP addresses, protocol information,
    checksums, and so on. (But if you were coding your own protocol, you
    could in theory avoid using those.)


    :If i have a ping time of 10ms that means it took 10 ms to return, if this
    :spikes up to 100ms it took 100ms to return. How can i find what my
    :transfer should allow in the real world.

    You could do a google search on phrases like "maximum ethernet throughput".
    For example, the formula in the following message should still be
    correct:

    http://www-mice.cs.ucl.ac.uk/multimedia/misc/tcp_ip/8804.mm.www/0131.html

    and see the analysis at

    http://www.babinszki.com/Networking/Max-Ethernet-and-TCP-Throughput.html
    --
    "The human genome is powerless in the face of chocolate."
    -- Dr. Adam Drewnowski
     
    Walter Roberson, Nov 12, 2003
    #2
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