Backprinting photo prints - inkjet or laserjet?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Harry, Jan 19, 2004.

  1. Harry

    Harry Guest

    I would like to be able to print shot info on the back of commercial
    lab prints (eg. Fujicolor Crystal Archive)after development.

    Tried a Cannon inkjet, but the backing is apparently impermable (not
    paper) and the ink never adhered and would just wipe off even an hour
    later.

    I guess laser would work with the toner fused on, but I'm worried
    about the heat involved in the fusing process and fear that it would
    damage the print.

    Anyone have some experience with this sort of thing????

    Thanks for any advice,

    -Harry
    Harry, Jan 19, 2004
    #1
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  2. Harry

    Robertwgross Guest

    Harry wrote:
    >I would like to be able to print shot info on the back of commercial
    >lab prints (eg. Fujicolor Crystal Archive)after development.
    >Tried a Cannon inkjet, but the backing is apparently impermable (not
    >paper) and the ink never adhered and would just wipe off even an hour
    >later.
    >I guess laser would work with the toner fused on, but I'm worried
    >about the heat involved in the fusing process and fear that it would
    >damage the print.
    >Anyone have some experience with this sort of thing????


    Every one of my prints has information on the back. Typically, it is title,
    index number, and location information, but it could be EXIF data just as well.
    I print it on transparent labels, laser printed. They stick on fairly well, and
    they can be removed if necessary.

    ---Bob Gross---
    Robertwgross, Jan 19, 2004
    #2
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  3. Harry

    Stewy Guest

    Most photo paper these days is plastic coated to some extent - apparently to
    increase it's lifetime.

    I'd suggest the cheapo solution. Print with any old printer and cover with a
    strip of Scotch Tape or you could even try using sticky labels - the address
    labels that come in A4 sheets.

    "Harry" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I would like to be able to print shot info on the back of commercial
    > lab prints (eg. Fujicolor Crystal Archive)after development.
    >
    > Tried a Cannon inkjet, but the backing is apparently impermable (not
    > paper) and the ink never adhered and would just wipe off even an hour
    > later.
    >
    > I guess laser would work with the toner fused on, but I'm worried
    > about the heat involved in the fusing process and fear that it would
    > damage the print.
    >
    > Anyone have some experience with this sort of thing????
    >
    > Thanks for any advice,
    >
    > -Harry
    Stewy, Jan 19, 2004
    #3
  4. (Harry) writes:

    > I would like to be able to print shot info on the back of commercial
    > lab prints (eg. Fujicolor Crystal Archive)after development.
    >
    > Tried a Cannon inkjet, but the backing is apparently impermable (not
    > paper) and the ink never adhered and would just wipe off even an hour
    > later.


    Just get double sided paper appropriate for your printer. I just went through
    the exercise of making a lot of calendars, and tried various papers. For my HP
    deskjet 6122, the paper I used for the calendars was HP double sided glossy
    brochure paper (44 pound) that I got at Staples, though I liked the Red River
    45 pound Zeppelin semi-gloss double side paper also. For matte papers, Epson
    double sided matte paper is good as is the Red River 50 pound double sided
    matte. Tetenal makes a line of glossy papers on one side and matte on the
    second, though I have banding problems with my particular printer (I can't use
    any of the heavier papers with that printer). Lumijet also makes 2 sided
    papers and there is at least one Ilford double sided paper also.

    Red River papers are available through mail order:

    http://www.redrivercatalog.com/

    > I guess laser would work with the toner fused on, but I'm worried
    > about the heat involved in the fusing process and fear that it would
    > damage the print.
    >
    > Anyone have some experience with this sort of thing????
    >
    > Thanks for any advice,
    >
    > -Harry


    --
    Michael Meissner
    email:
    http://www.the-meissners.org
    Michael Meissner, Jan 19, 2004
    #4
  5. Harry

    Jeff Guest

    "Stewy" <> wrote in
    news:buge1r$54u$:

    > Most photo paper these days is plastic coated to some extent -
    > apparently to increase it's lifetime.
    >
    > I'd suggest the cheapo solution. Print with any old printer and cover
    > with a strip of Scotch Tape or you could even try using sticky labels
    > - the address labels that come in A4 sheets.
    >
    > "Harry" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I would like to be able to print shot info on the back of commercial
    >> lab prints (eg. Fujicolor Crystal Archive)after development.
    >>
    >> Tried a Cannon inkjet, but the backing is apparently impermable (not
    >> paper) and the ink never adhered and would just wipe off even an hour
    >> later.
    >>
    >> I guess laser would work with the toner fused on, but I'm worried
    >> about the heat involved in the fusing process and fear that it would
    >> damage the print.
    >>
    >> Anyone have some experience with this sort of thing????
    >>
    >> Thanks for any advice,
    >>
    >> -Harry

    >


    You are likely to end up with damage to the print after long-term
    storage with common tapes or labels on your prints, especially if the
    prints are in contact with others. Do a web search for companies that
    sell acid-free archival storage materials. There are special labels and
    markers available.
    BTW, besides stability, the main reason for plastic coating is to
    prevent processing chemicals from soaking into the paper. This lessens
    carryover from one chemical to the next and reduces the washing needed
    to remove the chemicals before drying.
    Jeff, Jan 19, 2004
    #5
  6. Harry

    Harry Guest

    Thanks to all for their great information, suggestions, and warnings.

    Think I'll go with the archival clear labels printed on a laserjet,
    although I'm a little concerned about adhesive bleed over time from
    the edges of the labels onto the image of the next photo in a stack...

    -Harry
    Harry, Jan 20, 2004
    #6
  7. Harry

    Robertwgross Guest

    Harry wrote:
    >Think I'll go with the archival clear labels printed on a laserjet,
    >although I'm a little concerned about adhesive bleed over time from
    >the edges of the labels onto the image of the next photo in a stack...


    Yes, I printed a bunch of prints, and before they had dried, I stuck the labels
    on the back and stacked them up. Later, once dried, I could see in the print
    where the label had been on the adjacent print. (not a good thing)

    So, now I dry each print (maybe 90F for 5 minutes) before I affix a label.

    ---Bob Gross---
    Robertwgross, Jan 21, 2004
    #7
  8. Harry

    MPHunt Guest

    Jeff <> wrote in message news:<Xns94758CDB77E8jnomailcom@206.141.193.32>...
    > "Stewy" <> wrote in
    > news:buge1r$54u$:
    >
    > > Most photo paper these days is plastic coated to some extent -
    > > apparently to increase it's lifetime.
    > >
    > > I'd suggest the cheapo solution. Print with any old printer and cover
    > > with a strip of Scotch Tape or you could even try using sticky labels
    > > - the address labels that come in A4 sheets.
    > >
    > > "Harry" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> I would like to be able to print shot info on the back of commercial
    > >> lab prints (eg. Fujicolor Crystal Archive)after development.
    > >>
    > >> Tried a Cannon inkjet, but the backing is apparently impermable (not
    > >> paper) and the ink never adhered and would just wipe off even an hour
    > >> later.
    > >>
    > >> I guess laser would work with the toner fused on, but I'm worried
    > >> about the heat involved in the fusing process and fear that it would
    > >> damage the print.
    > >>
    > >> Anyone have some experience with this sort of thing????
    > >>
    > >> Thanks for any advice,
    > >>
    > >> -Harry

    > >

    >
    > You are likely to end up with damage to the print after long-term
    > storage with common tapes or labels on your prints, especially if the
    > prints are in contact with others. Do a web search for companies that
    > sell acid-free archival storage materials. There are special labels and
    > markers available.
    > BTW, besides stability, the main reason for plastic coating is to
    > prevent processing chemicals from soaking into the paper. This lessens
    > carryover from one chemical to the next and reduces the washing needed
    > to remove the chemicals before drying.




    FOR ALL YOUR PRINTING REQUIREMENTS CONTACT
    MPH PRINTING SERVICES
    MPHunt, Jan 25, 2004
    #8
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