Baby grand

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Nov 4, 2007.

  1. Okay, here's the deal. I inherited a baby grand piano. Had no idea I
    wanted one, and it was a bitch to transport to my shop. It's in very
    good shape except the finish is showing quite a bit of age. I'm not keen
    on refinishing it, but if that's what it takes then I'll do it. Anybody
    got any suggestions on methods to refinish or products to use? Many
    years ago I refinished quite a few things, but I've not had that kind of
    energy for a while. Suggestions?
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Nov 4, 2007
    #1
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  2. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    ChairMan Guest

    In news:,
    Rôgêr <>spewed forth:
    > Okay, here's the deal. I inherited a baby grand piano. Had no idea I
    > wanted one, and it was a bitch to transport to my shop. It's in very
    > good shape except the finish is showing quite a bit of age. I'm not
    > keen on refinishing it, but if that's what it takes then I'll do it.
    > Anybody got any suggestions on methods to refinish or products to
    > use? Many years ago I refinished quite a few things, but I've not had
    > that kind of energy for a while. Suggestions?


    They're a bitch to do right
    http://www.mohawk-finishing.com/default.asp
    is a start for lacquers
     
    ChairMan, Nov 4, 2007
    #2
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  3. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    VanguardLH Guest

    "Rôgêr" wrote in message
    news:...
    > Okay, here's the deal. I inherited a baby grand piano. Had no idea I
    > wanted one, and it was a bitch to transport to my shop. It's in very
    > good shape except the finish is showing quite a bit of age. I'm not
    > keen on refinishing it, but if that's what it takes then I'll do it.
    > Anybody got any suggestions on methods to refinish or products to
    > use? Many years ago I refinished quite a few things, but I've not
    > had that kind of energy for a while. Suggestions?



    If the finish is in bad shape, how are the keys? I had a baby grand
    (Steinway) but it had ivory key tops which are illegal to replace.
    Got them redone using ceramic so they had the same density, hardness,
    and nearly the same surface texture (actually nicer). I couldn't
    stand playing on pianos that had plastic caps: too light in weight,
    too soft for feel. That was 30 years ago, and couldn't lug the thing
    around so it go sold something like 30 years ago.

    I figure if the finish has been mistreated then the keys might need
    fixing up, too.

    You might want to contact a restorer. Refinishing an old piano could
    detract from its antique or intrinsic value. If refinishing enhances
    its value, you probably need pro advice on how to refinish the same
    way so the patchwork matches the same material and sheen as the
    original. Redoing the entire finish pretty much means you degrade its
    value to what new pianos are selling for today (you lose the antique
    value). Sometimes not doing anything to the finish brings more cash
    than making it look pretty (i.e., collectors' eyes may be more
    discriminating in a different way than some average joe looking at
    it).
     
    VanguardLH, Nov 4, 2007
    #3
  4. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    jils Guest

    Rôgêr wrote:
    > Okay, here's the deal. I inherited a baby grand piano. Had no idea I
    > wanted one, and it was a bitch to transport to my shop. It's in very
    > good shape except the finish is showing quite a bit of age. I'm not keen
    > on refinishing it, but if that's what it takes then I'll do it. Anybody
    > got any suggestions on methods to refinish or products to use? Many
    > years ago I refinished quite a few things, but I've not had that kind of
    > energy for a while. Suggestions?


    absolutely highly recommend these products:
    http://www.howardproducts.com/
    watch the videos, they're amazing!
     
    jils, Nov 4, 2007
    #4
  5. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=

    philo Guest

    "Rôgêr" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Okay, here's the deal. I inherited a baby grand piano. Had no idea I
    > wanted one, and it was a bitch to transport to my shop. It's in very
    > good shape except the finish is showing quite a bit of age. I'm not keen
    > on refinishing it, but if that's what it takes then I'll do it. Anybody
    > got any suggestions on methods to refinish or products to use? Many
    > years ago I refinished quite a few things, but I've not had that kind of
    > energy for a while. Suggestions?



    I restore those old, wooden console type radios from the 1930's and 40's...
    so I don't know if that quite equates to baby grand pianos.

    HOWEVER ...refinishing (especially if done wrong) can seriously degrade the
    value of something.

    I have seen many old radios ruined because someone refinished them!


    I personally use an Almond Stick (it will come up on a google search)

    It will nicely blend-in unsightly scratches without actually leaving any
    visible trace.


    An antique that's shown a little wear and tear is worth more ( in my
    opinion) and looks better than something that's been obviously refinished.

    So unless you are confident that you could perform a literally perfect
    refinishing...you may be best off just using an Almond Stick...
    and allowing the piano to show a little bit of it's age.


    The important thing is how does it sound?

    You can have a piano tuner come over and tune it up and give you an
    assessment.




    I picked up a beautiful old upright at a rummage sale many years ago for
    $100.

    Though it was in non-working condition...I knew it was a good decision when
    I saw a swivel seat identical to the one that came with my piano
    for $100 at an antiques shop.

    I had a piano repairman come over to fix the piano and he had it working
    fine in a few minutes...

    The reason most of the keys were jammed was simply because it was full of
    pencils!!!!

    He tuned it up and told me it was in amazingly good shape.


    $100 for the piano.
    $60 to have it tuned.

    Plus I got about a year's supply of pencils.



    BTW: Even though I had been looking for a piano so my daughter could take
    lessons (and I got back into piano playing again too)
    I had no intention of looking for a piano at a rummage sale.

    When I went to it...the guy who was a retired college professor asked me if
    I was looking for anything in particular...and it turned out he had wanted
    to get rid of the antique
    piano he had. It had been his daughter's but she had grown up and moved out.

    He sold it to me so cheaply because he knew it was going to a good home...
    plus he was very concerned with damage...both to the piano and to his
    house...
    so he insisted that for the low price I would have to get a professional
    piano mover


    I was given a week to come and get it...so i went home and tried to figure
    out how I could get the piano moved.


    At that very instant I heard a loud grumbling and looked out the window.
    There was a big red truck moving slowly down the street
    and on it's side was a huge sign : Walsh Piano Movers.

    I decided to given them a call.

    I was very pleased that I was quoted a price of $100 to move it as I only
    lived about a mile away from the professor.

    (This was 20 years ago so I can't imagine it would be that inexpensive
    today)


    Anyway I cleared out a few places in the living room as I was not sure
    exactly where I wanted it setup.


    Then the truck arrived and I saw 4 of the largest and mean looking oafs I've
    ever seen grunting and cursing their way up my front steps.

    The piano was full sized upright and certainly no little measly spinet.


    They came into the house and set it up against the back wall...then glared
    at me.


    I decided that that was where I wanted the piano...and it has not moved from
    that spot since.


    The money I paid to have it moved might very well have been the best $100
    I've ever spent....


    A few weeks before that I had helped move a piano for someone and all
    parties to the move never spoke to one another again...
    it was a horrible mess. The piano had to go to a 2nd floor apartment and
    would not fit around the bend in the stairs.

    One guy was left bearing most of the weight when two people walked away...
    and the guy who got stuck with the weight was so angry he ripped one leg off
    so he could get it in the apartment.


    Even though no one spoke to one another again...the one thing that was
    agreed on was that when the woman moved out of the apartment...
    the piano stayed!!!!
     
    philo, Nov 4, 2007
    #5
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