Availabilty of 802.11b SIP Analog Telephone Adapter ?

Discussion in 'VOIP' started by paul@robinson-telephone.com, May 9, 2005.

  1. Guest

    You can buy a broadband SIP adapter even in a stationery store like
    Office Depot for around US$60.00 or so, which means the technology is
    not bleeding edge. Are there any similar devices to allow ordinary
    analog phones to be plugged into to it, that instead of using broadband
    (RJ14 connector) as the device's connector to the Internet it will
    operate over 802.11b to, say, a wireless base station or perhaps in
    ad-hoc mode? Obviously b is more than enough capacity since you only
    need about 8K of bandwidth and 11b will give you 10 megabits.

    I'm not talking about a portable handset type phone, I'm talking about
    being able to plug ordinary $10 analog phones (like the kind you
    normally can plug into a RJ11 POTS wall socket) into a SIP adapter
    which uses 802.11b instead of broadband. Or it could be 802.11g, only
    I'm thinking an 802.11b adapter would be less expensive.

    Paul Robinson
    paul (at) robinson-telephone.com
     
    , May 9, 2005
    #1
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  2. Martin² Guest

    Well, you could plug your old phone into a SIP ATA adapter, then plug that
    in to Ethernet port of WIFI 802.11x bridge.
    Personally I think it would be more convenient to get WIFI VoiP phone,
    though they are expensive at the moment, so I am waiting for the prices to
    drop...
    Regards,
    Martin
     
    Martin², May 10, 2005
    #2
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  3. wkearney99 Guest

    > I'm not talking about a portable handset type phone, I'm talking about
    > being able to plug ordinary $10 analog phones (like the kind you
    > normally can plug into a RJ11 POTS wall socket) into a SIP adapter
    > which uses 802.11b instead of broadband. Or it could be 802.11g, only
    > I'm thinking an 802.11b adapter would be less expensive.


    The WiFi stuff is going to require electricity to run. By the time you deal
    with the AC adapter for such a device you'd probably be better off just
    putting an ATA at the central end of the POTS extension.
     
    wkearney99, May 11, 2005
    #3
  4. > The WiFi stuff is going to require electricity to run. By the
    > time you deal with the AC adapter for such a device you'd
    > probably be better off just putting an ATA at the central
    > end of the POTS extension.


    I'm a little new here. What's an ATA?

    I'm aware it requires electricity; that is not a problem.

    The issue is this: If I place an SIP adapter in the person's house so
    they can hook up an ordinary POTS telephone to it, and say, I put a
    WIFI base port on a pole or pedestal on the street or in another
    building to connect their phone to the PSTN, I'm running a wireless
    service which is not subject to state regulation, and since it's IP
    telephony, meaning it's a service running on an Internet connection,
    under FCC regulations it is completely excluded from Federal
    regulation.

    If I run a regular phone line to their house, it's a wired connection
    and I need a license to operate a CLEC from the Virginia Corporation
    Commission (Virginia's version of what, in most states, is called the
    PUC). I may also be subject to some FCC regulations.

    So, by using an SIP box I solve two problems: how to connect the last
    mile cheaply, and how not to have to get a license as a telephone
    company from the Commonwealth of Virginia or follow any FCC
    regulations. I can just provide quality service without having to
    fight with state regulators who think their purpose in life is to
    protect Verizon from competitors.
     
    Paul Robinson, May 15, 2005
    #4
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