Automatic ISO versus Manual Setting

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Morton, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. Morton

    Morton Guest

    Hi,

    I'm an advanced photographer, who for reasons of age and decreasing
    vision gave up on my SLR film outfit. I'm now using a Canon Digital Elph
    SD-850. I can set the ISO values for automatic, which is usually OK
    but occasionally results in very noisy pictures when a high ISO setting
    was turned on. Setting the ISO manually for, e.g. ISO 100 should
    theoretically give the best noise-free pictures. This camera has a shake
    icon for when the shutter speed is too slow, and can be set to bump up
    the ISO on one shot at a time by pressing one button.

    In general, is one better off with automatic ISO, or manual at 100 while
    watching out for slow shutter speeds?

    Thank you.

    Mort
    Morton, Feb 22, 2008
    #1
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  2. Morton

    Dave Cohen Guest

    Morton wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm an advanced photographer, who for reasons of age and decreasing
    > vision gave up on my SLR film outfit. I'm now using a Canon Digital Elph
    > SD-850. I can set the ISO values for automatic, which is usually OK but
    > occasionally results in very noisy pictures when a high ISO setting was
    > turned on. Setting the ISO manually for, e.g. ISO 100 should
    > theoretically give the best noise-free pictures. This camera has a shake
    > icon for when the shutter speed is too slow, and can be set to bump up
    > the ISO on one shot at a time by pressing one button.
    >
    > In general, is one better off with automatic ISO, or manual at 100 while
    > watching out for slow shutter speeds?
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Mort


    I set my camera to 100. If a special situation should require something
    higher I override it for that instance.
    Dave Cohen
    Dave Cohen, Feb 22, 2008
    #2
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  3. Morton wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm an advanced photographer, who for reasons of age and decreasing
    > vision gave up on my SLR film outfit. I'm now using a Canon Digital
    > Elph SD-850. I can set the ISO values for automatic, which is
    > usually OK but occasionally results in very noisy pictures when a high
    > ISO
    > setting was turned on. Setting the ISO manually for, e.g. ISO 100
    > should theoretically give the best noise-free pictures. This camera
    > has a shake icon for when the shutter speed is too slow, and can be
    > set to bump up the ISO on one shot at a time by pressing one button.
    >
    > In general, is one better off with automatic ISO, or manual at 100
    > while watching out for slow shutter speeds?
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Mort


    Mort,

    With the small-sensor cameras I've used, the lowest ISO setting gives by
    far the best results. I keep mine on the lowest ISO. If you therefore
    need a low shutter speed, try and find a brace for the camera. Failing
    that, if you have an inage which is very noisy, you can try
    noise-reduction software (but don't overdo it), and/or convert the image
    to monochrome where the grain (noise) can add character to the image.

    Cheers,
    David
    David J Taylor, Feb 22, 2008
    #3
  4. Morton

    Morton Guest

    Dave Cohen wrote:
    > Morton wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I'm an advanced photographer, who for reasons of age and decreasing
    >> vision gave up on my SLR film outfit. I'm now using a Canon Digital
    >> Elph SD-850. I can set the ISO values for automatic, which is usually
    >> OK but occasionally results in very noisy pictures when a high ISO
    >> setting was turned on. Setting the ISO manually for, e.g. ISO 100
    >> should theoretically give the best noise-free pictures. This camera
    >> has a shake icon for when the shutter speed is too slow, and can be
    >> set to bump up the ISO on one shot at a time by pressing one button.
    >>
    >> In general, is one better off with automatic ISO, or manual at 100
    >> while watching out for slow shutter speeds?
    >>
    >> Thank you.
    >>
    >> Mort

    >
    > I set my camera to 100. If a special situation should require something
    > higher I override it for that instance.
    > Dave Cohen


    Hi Dave and David,

    Thanks for the good advice. It sounds logical, and paying attention to
    the shake icon in poor light should not be difficult.

    I'll try setting the ISO at 100 as my default setting, and bump up the
    ISO manually and/or lean against a wall, as needed.

    Mort
    Morton, Feb 22, 2008
    #4
  5. Morton added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    ....

    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm an advanced photographer, who for reasons of age and
    > decreasing vision gave up on my SLR film outfit. I'm now using
    > a Canon Digital Elph
    > SD-850. I can set the ISO values for automatic, which is
    > usually OK
    > but occasionally results in very noisy pictures when a high
    > ISO setting was turned on. Setting the ISO manually for, e.g.
    > ISO 100 should theoretically give the best noise-free
    > pictures. This camera has a shake icon for when the shutter
    > speed is too slow, and can be set to bump up the ISO on one
    > shot at a time by pressing one button.
    >
    > In general, is one better off with automatic ISO, or manual at
    > 100 while watching out for slow shutter speeds?
    >

    What lighting condition(s) are you shooting in, what subject(s) do
    you shoot, etc.? Since you're a film photographer, you know the
    rule of 16, namely shutter at the reciprocal of the ASA/ISO at
    f/16, so at ISO 100 in bright daylight, your camera ought to be
    able to do just fine. But, if you're shooting action and/or you
    have a need to get more DOF, you might first try setting either
    shutter or aperture priority mode instead of full auto or
    programmed auto and see if you can get by at ISO 100. If not, then
    try 200 then 400. I don't like auto ISO for exactly the reasons you
    cite. Hope this helps some but I'd need more info to give a better
    answer.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 22, 2008
    #5
  6. Morton added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    ....

    >> I set my camera to 100. If a special situation should require
    >> something higher I override it for that instance.
    >> Dave Cohen

    >
    > Hi Dave and David,
    >
    > Thanks for the good advice. It sounds logical, and paying
    > attention to the shake icon in poor light should not be
    > difficult.
    >
    > I'll try setting the ISO at 100 as my default setting, and
    > bump up the ISO manually and/or lean against a wall, as
    > needed.


    Before I resorted to leaning against a wall, which is iffy at best,
    I'd go to 200 or 400 and kill the noise in your fav graphics
    editor. If the camera is reasonably noise-free, it should be no
    problem. Again, I don't know if your subjects are moving or stock
    still or how steady you are. e.g., in my film days circa 1970s with
    a Nikon FTN and a 50mm lens, I could get at least reasonable
    available light shots at 1/4 or 1/8 sec in places where I couldn't
    use flash and the film of the day wasn't nearly high speed enough.
    But now, at age 60, below 1/30 with my Rebel XT and I get
    noticeable shake, so there's a lot of variables to consider.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 22, 2008
    #6
  7. Morton

    Bob Williams Guest

    Morton wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm an advanced photographer, who for reasons of age and decreasing
    > vision gave up on my SLR film outfit. I'm now using a Canon Digital Elph
    > SD-850. I can set the ISO values for automatic, which is usually OK but
    > occasionally results in very noisy pictures when a high ISO setting was
    > turned on. Setting the ISO manually for, e.g. ISO 100 should
    > theoretically give the best noise-free pictures. This camera has a shake
    > icon for when the shutter speed is too slow, and can be set to bump up
    > the ISO on one shot at a time by pressing one button.
    >
    > In general, is one better off with automatic ISO, or manual at 100 while
    > watching out for slow shutter speeds?
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Mort



    Keeping your camera at its lowest ISO setting will always give the
    lowest noise level.....BUT..... If you shoot in a low light situation
    you will pay a price, one way or another. "There ain't no free lunch".
    Low ISO will mean low shutter speed which can cause blur from camera or
    subject movement. You may end up with a well exposed, low noise, UNsharp
    image. Image stabilization helps but it has its limits too. If yo bump
    up the ISO to say 400 you can use a faster shutter speed to reduce
    motion blur, but the price you pay is more noise.
    As the old adage says, "You pays your money and you takes your choice".
    Bob Williams
    Bob Williams, Feb 22, 2008
    #7
  8. Morton

    ray Guest

    On Fri, 22 Feb 2008 11:18:50 -0500, Morton wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm an advanced photographer, who for reasons of age and decreasing
    > vision gave up on my SLR film outfit. I'm now using a Canon Digital Elph
    > SD-850. I can set the ISO values for automatic, which is usually OK
    > but occasionally results in very noisy pictures when a high ISO setting
    > was turned on. Setting the ISO manually for, e.g. ISO 100 should
    > theoretically give the best noise-free pictures. This camera has a shake
    > icon for when the shutter speed is too slow, and can be set to bump up
    > the ISO on one shot at a time by pressing one button.
    >
    > In general, is one better off with automatic ISO, or manual at 100 while
    > watching out for slow shutter speeds?
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Mort


    I don't see a major problem. Though I have encountered some winter
    scenery this year where ISO 64 way too high to produce a useable shot - I
    finally went to auto ISO for the day.
    ray, Feb 22, 2008
    #8
  9. [OT] Re: Automatic ISO versus Manual Setting

    HEMI - Powered wrote:

    > But now, at age 60, below 1/30 with my Rebel XT and I get
    > noticeable shake, so there's a lot of variables to consider.


    Hi, H-P. Look at the bright side, though...if you were much younger than
    60, you wouldn't *remember* those *real* hemis. :)

    PS I'm sixty, as well.

    --
    Blinky
    Blinky the Shark, Feb 23, 2008
    #9
  10. Morton

    Morton Guest

    ray wrote:
    > On Fri, 22 Feb 2008 11:18:50 -0500, Morton wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I'm an advanced photographer, who for reasons of age and decreasing
    >> vision gave up on my SLR film outfit. I'm now using a Canon Digital Elph
    >> SD-850. I can set the ISO values for automatic, which is usually OK
    >> but occasionally results in very noisy pictures when a high ISO setting
    >> was turned on. Setting the ISO manually for, e.g. ISO 100 should
    >> theoretically give the best noise-free pictures. This camera has a shake
    >> icon for when the shutter speed is too slow, and can be set to bump up
    >> the ISO on one shot at a time by pressing one button.
    >>
    >> In general, is one better off with automatic ISO, or manual at 100 while
    >> watching out for slow shutter speeds?
    >>
    >> Thank you.
    >>
    >> Mort

    >
    > I don't see a major problem. Though I have encountered some winter
    > scenery this year where ISO 64 way too high to produce a useable shot - I
    > finally went to auto ISO for the day.


    Hi,

    Thanks for all the nice replies. My Canon SD 850 says in its handbook
    that at higher ISOs it automatically applies noise reduction. As I
    understand it, that entails some loss of sharpness. I guess it is a
    matter of weighing all the factors together, e.g. large DOF needed,
    etc..moving versus stationary subjects,etc.. In the old days, with
    Kodachrome ASA 10, it was 1/25 at f. 6.3 in sunlight, and cross your
    fingers.

    When I do lean against a wall, or use a beanbag, if it is a stationary
    subject I use the selftimer to reduce vibration.

    Thanks again.

    Morton
    Morton, Feb 23, 2008
    #10
  11. Re: [OT] Re: Automatic ISO versus Manual Setting

    Blinky the Shark added these comments in the current discussion
    du jour ...

    >> But now, at age 60, below 1/30 with my Rebel XT and I get
    >> noticeable shake, so there's a lot of variables to consider.

    >
    > Hi, H-P. Look at the bright side, though...if you were much
    > younger than 60, you wouldn't *remember* those *real* hemis.
    > :)
    >
    > PS I'm sixty, as well.
    >

    I see your smiley face ... I do have a "real" HEMI, just a new
    generation 350 hp 5.7L, not the "elephant motor" 426 Street Hemi,
    but in today's world, it is much more pleasant to drive and FAR
    cheaper than a restored 426-anything. And, happy 61, Blinky,
    whenever that is! Mine is next month.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 23, 2008
    #11
  12. Bob Williams added these comments in the current discussion du
    jour ...

    [snip]
    > Keeping your camera at its lowest ISO setting will always give
    > the lowest noise level.....BUT..... If you shoot in a low
    > light situation you will pay a price, one way or another.
    > "There ain't no free lunch". Low ISO will mean low shutter
    > speed which can cause blur from camera or subject movement.
    > You may end up with a well exposed, low noise, UNsharp image.
    > Image stabilization helps but it has its limits too. If yo
    > bump up the ISO to say 400 you can use a faster shutter speed
    > to reduce motion blur, but the price you pay is more noise.
    > As the old adage says, "You pays your money and you takes your
    > choice". Bob Williams
    >

    Agreed, Bob. Image stabilization is to cameras what anti-lock
    brakes is to cars. A Godsend and a great safety feature but not a
    substitute for good operation practice.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 23, 2008
    #12
  13. Morton added these comments in the current discussion du jour
    ....

    > Hi,
    >
    > Thanks for all the nice replies. My Canon SD 850 says in its
    > handbook that at higher ISOs it automatically applies noise
    > reduction. As I understand it, that entails some loss of
    > sharpness. I guess it is a matter of weighing all the factors
    > together, e.g. large DOF needed, etc..moving versus stationary
    > subjects,etc.. In the old days, with Kodachrome ASA 10, it was
    > 1/25 at f. 6.3 in sunlight, and cross your fingers.


    Suggest you turn OFF the noise reduction! It is MUCH better to do
    that while you're looking in PhotoShop, PSP, or whatever you use
    than to have your camera blindly apply some arbitary smoothing
    factor. I'm not at all saying you'll mangle your images, just that
    you won't ever know what they looked like without the noise
    reduction. BTW, noise reduction and retention of detail and
    sharpness at any given ISO from 100 to 32000 is a tradeoff because
    in general they are mutually exclusive.

    > When I do lean against a wall, or use a beanbag, if it is a
    > stationary subject I use the selftimer to reduce vibration.
    >

    Also, try spreading your feet apart a comfortable distance, pull
    your arms in close to your sides, and hold the camera tight against
    your head. And, if the subject isn't moving, try using your
    camera's self-timer to avoid the shake inherent in pressing the
    shutter button.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 23, 2008
    #13
  14. Re: [OT] Re: Automatic ISO versus Manual Setting

    HEMI - Powered wrote:

    > Blinky the Shark added these comments in the current discussion
    > du jour ...
    >
    >>> But now, at age 60, below 1/30 with my Rebel XT and I get
    >>> noticeable shake, so there's a lot of variables to consider.

    >>
    >> Hi, H-P. Look at the bright side, though...if you were much
    >> younger than 60, you wouldn't *remember* those *real* hemis.
    >> :)
    >>
    >> PS I'm sixty, as well.
    >>

    > I see your smiley face ... I do have a "real" HEMI, just a new
    > generation 350 hp 5.7L, not the "elephant motor" 426 Street Hemi,


    Takes me back to hanging out at the drags every other weekend in the late
    '60s.

    > but in today's world, it is much more pleasant to drive and FAR
    > cheaper than a restored 426-anything. And, happy 61, Blinky,
    > whenever that is! Mine is next month.


    Mine's not until June -- ya old fart. ;)


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Blinky: http://blinkynet.net
    Blinky the Shark, Feb 23, 2008
    #14
  15. Re: [OT] Re: Automatic ISO versus Manual Setting

    Blinky the Shark added these comments in the current discussion
    du jour ...

    >>> Hi, H-P. Look at the bright side, though...if you were much
    >>> younger than 60, you wouldn't *remember* those *real* hemis.
    >>> :)
    >>>
    >>> PS I'm sixty, as well.
    >>>

    >> I see your smiley face ... I do have a "real" HEMI, just a
    >> new generation 350 hp 5.7L, not the "elephant motor" 426
    >> Street Hemi,

    >
    > Takes me back to hanging out at the drags every other weekend
    > in the late '60s.


    In my case, it was running the Woodward Avenue Grand Prix every
    Friday and Saturday night in my muscle car and that of my friends
    trying our hand at street drag racing and picking up girls. Did
    lousy at both, I recall ... But, these days, we have the Woodward
    Dream Cruise. Not quite the same thing, but it's nice to see those
    old Mopars, Fords, Goats, SS-396s, etc.

    >> happy 61, Blinky, whenever that is! Mine is next month.

    >
    > Mine's not until June -- ya old fart. ;)
    >

    Let's just say that you're an old geezer and I'm a (slightly) older
    geezer. <grin> Have a great week, Blinky!

    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 23, 2008
    #15
  16. Re: [OT] Re: Automatic ISO versus Manual Setting

    HEMI - Powered wrote:

    > Blinky the Shark added these comments in the current discussion
    > du jour ...
    >
    >>>> Hi, H-P. Look at the bright side, though...if you were much
    >>>> younger than 60, you wouldn't *remember* those *real* hemis.
    >>>> :)
    >>>>
    >>>> PS I'm sixty, as well.
    >>>>
    >>> I see your smiley face ... I do have a "real" HEMI, just a
    >>> new generation 350 hp 5.7L, not the "elephant motor" 426
    >>> Street Hemi,

    >>
    >> Takes me back to hanging out at the drags every other weekend
    >> in the late '60s.

    >
    > In my case, it was running the Woodward Avenue Grand Prix every
    > Friday and Saturday night in my muscle car and that of my friends
    > trying our hand at street drag racing and picking up girls. Did


    I was doing that in my Corvette. Those were the days, eh?

    > lousy at both, I recall ... But, these days, we have the Woodward
    > Dream Cruise. Not quite the same thing, but it's nice to see those
    > old Mopars, Fords, Goats, SS-396s, etc.


    I was on the other side of the state, at US131 Dragway, just north of
    Kalamazoo.

    >>> happy 61, Blinky, whenever that is! Mine is next month.

    >>
    >> Mine's not until June -- ya old fart. ;)
    >>

    > Let's just say that you're an old geezer and I'm a (slightly) older
    > geezer. <grin> Have a great week, Blinky!


    One of my best RL friends is two months older than I am -- April '47
    versus June '47. That gives me two months every year to give him his
    ration of shit for the year. :)

    See ya.

    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Blinky: http://blinkynet.net
    Blinky the Shark, Feb 23, 2008
    #16
  17. Re: [OT] Re: Automatic ISO versus Manual Setting

    Blinky the Shark wrote:

    > HEMI - Powered wrote:
    >
    >> Blinky the Shark added these comments in the current discussion
    >> du jour ...
    >>
    >>>>> Hi, H-P. Look at the bright side, though...if you were much
    >>>>> younger than 60, you wouldn't *remember* those *real* hemis.
    >>>>> :)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> PS I'm sixty, as well.
    >>>>>
    >>>> I see your smiley face ... I do have a "real" HEMI, just a
    >>>> new generation 350 hp 5.7L, not the "elephant motor" 426
    >>>> Street Hemi,
    >>>
    >>> Takes me back to hanging out at the drags every other weekend
    >>> in the late '60s.

    >>
    >> In my case, it was running the Woodward Avenue Grand Prix every
    >> Friday and Saturday night in my muscle car and that of my friends
    >> trying our hand at street drag racing and picking up girls. Did

    >
    > I was doing that in my Corvette. Those were the days, eh?


    (Not in Detroit.)


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Blinky: http://blinkynet.net
    Blinky the Shark, Feb 23, 2008
    #17
  18. Re: [OT] Re: Automatic ISO versus Manual Setting

    Blinky the Shark added these comments in the current discussion
    du jour ...

    >>> Takes me back to hanging out at the drags every other
    >>> weekend in the late '60s.

    >>
    >> In my case, it was running the Woodward Avenue Grand Prix
    >> every Friday and Saturday night in my muscle car and that of
    >> my friends trying our hand at street drag racing and picking
    >> up girls. Did

    >
    > I was doing that in my Corvette. Those were the days, eh?


    What engine did you have? Mine My 1970 Challenger was only a 383
    because I valued A/C more than power, but my next door neighbor's
    Challenger was a 440 Six Pack.

    >> lousy at both, I recall ... But, these days, we have the
    >> Woodward Dream Cruise. Not quite the same thing, but it's
    >> nice to see those old Mopars, Fords, Goats, SS-396s, etc.

    >
    > I was on the other side of the state, at US131 Dragway, just
    > north of Kalamazoo.


    Was or an, Blinky? We get people from most of the states but I
    don't know how to read MI plates to give me any clue as to where
    they live. I don't even try to cruise on Saturday, the official
    day of the cruise on the 3rd weekend in August. But, I did cruise
    Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday evenings last year in the
    week before the formal cruise. Great feeling, 4 windows down
    sucking in the sights, sounds, and smells. By Thursday, Woodward
    is pretty much a parking lot, which is why I don't try on Sunday.
    It takes about 2 hours to crawl from 11 Mile Road, where I try to
    enter the pre-cruise, to maybe 14 Mile Road.

    I usually take pictures at several places in the month before the
    cruise. These are pre-cruise informal gatherings vs. a formal car
    show. The biggest gathering, with maybe 80 cars or so moving in
    and out all day, is in the Northwood Center parking lot at 13
    Mile Road and Woodward. Another is at a large gas station around
    14 Mile, and in the evenings after dinner, guys and gals back
    into the angled parking spots along the street where there's a
    strip of stores. I was too ill last year to walk around shooting
    car pictures, but strong enough to sit in my Charger and just
    cruise.

    >>>> happy 61, Blinky, whenever that is! Mine is next month.
    >>>
    >>> Mine's not until June -- ya old fart. ;)
    >>>

    >> Let's just say that you're an old geezer and I'm a (slightly)
    >> older geezer. <grin> Have a great week, Blinky!

    >
    > One of my best RL friends is two months older than I am --
    > April '47 versus June '47. That gives me two months every
    > year to give him his ration of shit for the year. :)
    >
    > See ya.
    >

    Yepper! Don't see you all that many places, Blinky, but it is
    always a joy to debate things with you; we have a lot in common
    and you have extraordinary knowledge in several technical areas
    that are of interest to me. Have a great week and stay warm!

    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 23, 2008
    #18
  19. Re: [OT] Re: Automatic ISO versus Manual Setting

    Blinky the Shark added these comments in the current discussion
    du jour ...

    >>>> Takes me back to hanging out at the drags every other
    >>>> weekend in the late '60s.
    >>>
    >>> In my case, it was running the Woodward Avenue Grand Prix
    >>> every Friday and Saturday night in my muscle car and that of
    >>> my friends trying our hand at street drag racing and picking
    >>> up girls. Did

    >>
    >> I was doing that in my Corvette. Those were the days, eh?

    >
    > (Not in Detroit.)
    >

    Yeah, in those days, Detroit enjoyed the unenviable reputation as
    the Murder Capital of the World.

    --
    HP, aka Jerry

    "Surely you jest - and don't call me Shirley!" - from the movie
    "Airplane!"
    HEMI - Powered, Feb 23, 2008
    #19
  20. Morton

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Fri, 22 Feb 2008 16:24:24 GMT, Dave Cohen <> wrote:
    : Morton wrote:
    : > Hi,
    : >
    : > I'm an advanced photographer, who for reasons of age and decreasing
    : > vision gave up on my SLR film outfit. I'm now using a Canon Digital Elph
    : > SD-850. I can set the ISO values for automatic, which is usually OK but
    : > occasionally results in very noisy pictures when a high ISO setting was
    : > turned on. Setting the ISO manually for, e.g. ISO 100 should
    : > theoretically give the best noise-free pictures. This camera has a shake
    : > icon for when the shutter speed is too slow, and can be set to bump up
    : > the ISO on one shot at a time by pressing one button.
    : >
    : > In general, is one better off with automatic ISO, or manual at 100 while
    : > watching out for slow shutter speeds?
    : >
    : > Thank you.
    : >
    : > Mort
    :
    : I set my camera to 100. If a special situation should require something
    : higher I override it for that instance.
    : Dave Cohen

    Outdoors you can do pretty much as you please. I set my camera to 200 because
    I've seen no discernible difference in image quality between 100 and 200. I
    don't believe my camera even has an auto-ISO setting.

    Indoors is another matter. Modern Canon flash units are almost pathologically
    averse to blown highlights. So if I use a low ISO setting, the flash exposes
    for the highlights, and the picture is badly underexposed overall. I get much
    better results by setting the ISO to 400 or even 800 (i.e., almost high enough
    for an available light shot, depending on the lens). This reduces the overall
    contrast of the scene, and I get much more even coverage from the flash. This
    is especially true if I'm using bounce flash, with the counterintuitive result
    that I often get more illumination with bounce flash than with direct flash.

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Feb 23, 2008
    #20
    1. Advertising

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