Aspect Ratio and photo album habits

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ivondale@aol.com, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I think I may have made a big mistake. I am upgrading from an ancient
    Kodak DC280 and just ordered a Canon Powershot S2. I take photos of my
    family, my vacation, etc. I print them using snapfish, etc at 4x6 and
    put them in photo albums. That's basically my entire usage.

    I got the S2 because I wanted some options to advance beyond basic P&S.
    I am a novice, so I didn't know about aspect ratio. Now I am
    concerned that I made a HUGE mistake. It sounds like for my needs, I
    bought the wrong camera and should have gotten a 3:2. Am I going to
    have to edit every photo I take, or crop every print by hand?
     
    , Jul 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. wrote:
    > I think I may have made a big mistake. I am upgrading from an ancient
    > Kodak DC280 and just ordered a Canon Powershot S2. I take photos of my
    > family, my vacation, etc. I print them using snapfish, etc at 4x6 and
    > put them in photo albums. That's basically my entire usage.
    >
    > I got the S2 because I wanted some options to advance beyond basic P&S.
    > I am a novice, so I didn't know about aspect ratio. Now I am
    > concerned that I made a HUGE mistake. It sounds like for my needs, I
    > bought the wrong camera and should have gotten a 3:2. Am I going to
    > have to edit every photo I take, or crop every print by hand?
    >

    It's no big deal, just remember that the top and bottom of your prints
    will be cut off, so don't frame uncle harry's head at the top edge of
    the viewfinder. BTW, pretty much every compact digicam on the market is
    4:3 format now (although a few have a 3:2 setting, which just crops in
    camera). If you are really concerned, just draw a couple of lines on the
    LCD, or put a bit of masking tape over the top and bottom of the lcd so
    you will be framing a 3:2 image (although the captured image will be the
    full 4:3). The other alternative is to get prints made at 4x5.3 - this
    size will give you 4:3 aspect ratio, and will still fit into albums
    designed for 6x4.
     
    Graham Fountain, Jul 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest

    please help me in becoming the group member in adult group !!!!
    here in dubai all site are blocked,,,this f*** country is Bullshit...




    wrote:
    > I think I may have made a big mistake. I am upgrading from an ancient
    > Kodak DC280 and just ordered a Canon Powershot S2. I take photos of my
    > family, my vacation, etc. I print them using snapfish, etc at 4x6 and
    > put them in photo albums. That's basically my entire usage.
    >
    > I got the S2 because I wanted some options to advance beyond basic P&S.
    > I am a novice, so I didn't know about aspect ratio. Now I am
    > concerned that I made a HUGE mistake. It sounds like for my needs, I
    > bought the wrong camera and should have gotten a 3:2. Am I going to
    > have to edit every photo I take, or crop every print by hand?
     
    , Jul 24, 2006
    #3
  4. Bucky Guest

    wrote:
    > I think I may have made a big mistake. I am upgrading from an ancient
    > Kodak DC280 and just ordered a Canon Powershot S2.


    Ah, the DC280, that was a great camera for its time. Fond memories!

    > I print them using snapfish, etc at 4x6 and
    > put them in photo albums. That's basically my entire usage.


    It's not too big of a deal. They usually just automatically trim off a
    little bit off the top and bottom.
     
    Bucky, Jul 24, 2006
    #4
  5. jeremy Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I think I may have made a big mistake. I am upgrading from an ancient
    > Kodak DC280 and just ordered a Canon Powershot S2. I take photos of my
    > family, my vacation, etc. I print them using snapfish, etc at 4x6 and
    > put them in photo albums. That's basically my entire usage.
    >
    > I got the S2 because I wanted some options to advance beyond basic P&S.
    > I am a novice, so I didn't know about aspect ratio. Now I am
    > concerned that I made a HUGE mistake. It sounds like for my needs, I
    > bought the wrong camera and should have gotten a 3:2. Am I going to
    > have to edit every photo I take, or crop every print by hand?
    >


    If you want complete control over the crop you will have to do it yourself.
    I know that Paint Shop Pro X has a very easy-to-use cropping tool where you
    can define the crop as "4x6" and a crop box will appear that always
    maintains a 3:2 aspect ratio. You need only use your mouse to adjust the
    size of the box and to position it over the part of the image that you wish
    to crop.

    But, yes, you will have to perform this operation yourself on each photo,
    unless you are willing to accept the default cropping offered by your online
    printing service. Kodak Gallery (formerly OFOTO) does offer to crop your
    images so there is no white space on the image. You may want to try them
    out and consider using them as your online printer, if your current vendor
    doesn't offer that service.

    Some digital cameras offer "postcard mode," where the cropping to 3:2 aspect
    ratio is done in camera. Most DSLRs use a 3:2 aspect ratio. My digicam
    uses only a 3:2 aspect ratio, which is one reason that I've continued to use
    it for 5 years. Id the aspect ratio is a major issue for you, the answer
    may lie in getting another camera. Bummer.
     
    jeremy, Jul 24, 2006
    #5
  6. Guest

    wrote:
    > I think I may have made a big mistake. I am upgrading from an ancient
    > Kodak DC280 and just ordered a Canon Powershot S2. I take photos of my
    > family, my vacation, etc. I print them using snapfish, etc at 4x6 and
    > put them in photo albums. That's basically my entire usage.
    >
    > I got the S2 because I wanted some options to advance beyond basic P&S.
    > I am a novice, so I didn't know about aspect ratio. Now I am
    > concerned that I made a HUGE mistake. It sounds like for my needs, I
    > bought the wrong camera and should have gotten a 3:2. Am I going to
    > have to edit every photo I take, or crop every print by hand?


    This is an age old problem with photography, not unique to digital.
    While a 4 x 6 is indeed 3:2, suppose you like an image so well you want
    an 8 x 10. Not 3:2, so there must be some cropping. This is a
    disadvantage when you are having printing done by someone else. Custom
    printing, where you can tell someone there exactly what you want is no
    problem, but for automated services, you get what they want to give
    you.

    With photo printers so cheap these days, consider printing them
    yourself. Then you will be able to chose yourself whether to crop the
    image and lose top and bottom, or do "physical cropping" with scissors
    or hobby knife and cut the image to 4 x 5.33 inches.
     
    , Jul 24, 2006
    #6
  7. Guest

    I want to thank everyone for the feedback. I walked into my local Ritz
    camera today to get an idea of what the cropped images look like. They
    actually told me that they have just started offering full sized 4.5x6
    images. They cost significantly more, of course, but I assume that if
    Ritz is going there, others will as well and prices will get more
    competitive.

    I just want to run something else by you all (and thanks again for
    being so helpful!). My husband thinks that if we adjust the resolution
    on the camera settings that will change the aspect ratio (although it
    doesn't say it in those terms). So essentially you would get a 4+ MP
    image rather than 5, but it would be the correct ratio for 4x6. Does
    that sound right? I think I'd prefer to wait for prices to come down,
    but just wondering if this is an accurate work-around.


    wrote:
     
    , Jul 24, 2006
    #7
  8. jeremy Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I want to thank everyone for the feedback. I walked into my local Ritz
    > camera today to get an idea of what the cropped images look like. They
    > actually told me that they have just started offering full sized 4.5x6
    > images. They cost significantly more, of course, but I assume that if
    > Ritz is going there, others will as well and prices will get more
    > competitive.
    >
    > I just want to run something else by you all (and thanks again for
    > being so helpful!). My husband thinks that if we adjust the resolution
    > on the camera settings that will change the aspect ratio (although it
    > doesn't say it in those terms). So essentially you would get a 4+ MP
    > image rather than 5, but it would be the correct ratio for 4x6. Does
    > that sound right? I think I'd prefer to wait for prices to come down,
    > but just wondering if this is an accurate work-around.
    >
    >
    > wrote:
    >


    Check your camera manual and ascertain whether it offers a 3:2 aspect ratio
    among its options.

    Lowering the resolution yourself will not do it. Your husband may have seen
    situations where the camera crops to 3:2 and that results in lowered
    resolution because the camera has, literally, thrown away some of the
    pixels. It would be the same if you took the image in your editing software
    and cropped it yourself--you would lose pixels.

    If all else fails, download the trial copy of PaintShop Pro X from the Corel
    web site and check out its crop functions. I have not checked, but you may
    even be able to batch process all of your shots at once, rather than
    cropping them individually.

    And do check out Kodak Gallery, as they will print so the image goes right
    out to the edges. The part that is cropped away would extend beyond the
    edges of the paper. You'll just have to learn to leave a bit of extra room
    at the edges of your viewfinder when you shoot photos, to compensate for
    what you lose. But at least you won't be saddled with the job of cropping
    the shots yourself.

    If you ever want to replace your camera, most DSLRs use a 3:2 aspect ratio.
    Of course, they cost more money . . .
     
    jeremy, Jul 24, 2006
    #8
  9. ? <> ?????? ??? ??????
    news:...
    >
    > wrote:
    > > I think I may have made a big mistake. I am upgrading from an ancient
    > > Kodak DC280 and just ordered a Canon Powershot S2. I take photos of my
    > > family, my vacation, etc. I print them using snapfish, etc at 4x6 and
    > > put them in photo albums. That's basically my entire usage.
    > >
    > > I got the S2 because I wanted some options to advance beyond basic P&S.
    > > I am a novice, so I didn't know about aspect ratio. Now I am
    > > concerned that I made a HUGE mistake. It sounds like for my needs, I
    > > bought the wrong camera and should have gotten a 3:2. Am I going to
    > > have to edit every photo I take, or crop every print by hand?

    >
    > This is an age old problem with photography, not unique to digital.
    > While a 4 x 6 is indeed 3:2, suppose you like an image so well you want
    > an 8 x 10. Not 3:2, so there must be some cropping. This is a
    > disadvantage when you are having printing done by someone else. Custom
    > printing, where you can tell someone there exactly what you want is no
    > problem, but for automated services, you get what they want to give
    > you.
    >
    > With photo printers so cheap these days, consider printing them
    > yourself.

    Yes, and printing at home is much cleaner and better (and convenient) than
    darkroom printing used to be.And you have no chemicals that would degrade if
    they aren't used up in time.





    >Then you will be able to chose yourself whether to crop >the
    > image and lose top and bottom, or do "physical cropping" with scissors
    > or hobby knife and cut the image to 4 x 5.33 inches.
    >
     
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios, Jul 24, 2006
    #9
  10. Dave Cohen Guest

    wrote:
    > I want to thank everyone for the feedback. I walked into my local Ritz
    > camera today to get an idea of what the cropped images look like. They
    > actually told me that they have just started offering full sized 4.5x6
    > images. They cost significantly more, of course, but I assume that if
    > Ritz is going there, others will as well and prices will get more
    > competitive.
    >
    > I just want to run something else by you all (and thanks again for
    > being so helpful!). My husband thinks that if we adjust the resolution
    > on the camera settings that will change the aspect ratio (although it
    > doesn't say it in those terms). So essentially you would get a 4+ MP
    > image rather than 5, but it would be the correct ratio for 4x6. Does
    > that sound right? I think I'd prefer to wait for prices to come down,
    > but just wondering if this is an accurate work-around.
    >
    >
    > wrote:
    >

    Every on-line vendor I've looked at let's you crop after uploading. The
    Kodak 4x6 units in CVS and other outlets let you crop. In addition, many
    on-line vendors offer the 4x5.3 size and as far as I know do not charge
    extra. It's not a big deal. As far as printing at home, it will cost you
    more but give you more control, but personally I'm very happy with
    YorkPhoto or Winkflash except I'm having a lot of problems uploading to
    the latter.
    Dave Cohen
     
    Dave Cohen, Jul 24, 2006
    #10
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