.arpa IP?

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by melic, Aug 23, 2006.

  1. melic

    melic Guest

    Hello,

    I recently connected to a wireless network and it gave this IP:

    130.***.*.**.in-addr.arpa

    Could anyone explain me how is this possible? As far as I know a .arpa TLD
    domain name
    does not exist, I have been surfing the internet for years and this is the
    first time
    I see a .arpa domain

    I have a basic idea of what the ARPA network was, the internet foundation
    or something like that,
    but it does not exist anymore which makes all this even more confusing (??)
     
    melic, Aug 23, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. melic

    melic Guest

    Re: .arpa IP? extra information

    On Wed, 23 Aug 2006 01:23:39 +0100, melic <> wrote:

    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > I recently connected to a wireless network and it gave this IP:
    >
    > 130.***.*.**.in-addr.arpa
    >
    > Could anyone explain me how is this possible? As far as I know a .arpa
    > TLD domain name
    > does not exist, I have been surfing the internet for years and this is
    > the first time
    > I see a .arpa domain
    >
    > I have a basic idea of what the ARPA network was, the internet
    > foundation or something like that,
    > but it does not exist anymore which makes all this even more confusing
    > (??)



    I should have provided this extra information:

    Name Address: 130.118.2.81.in-addr.arpa
    Remote Port: 3016
    Browser: Opera/9.01 (Windows NT 5.1; U; en)

    I got that visiting IPchicken
     
    melic, Aug 23, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. melic

    Moe Trin Guest

    Re: .arpa IP? extra information

    On 23 Aug 2006, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.computer.security, in article
    <-networks.com>, melic wrote:

    >On Wed, 23 Aug 2006 01:23:39 +0100, melic <> wrote:


    >> I recently connected to a wireless network and it gave this IP:
    >>
    >> 130.***.*.**.in-addr.arpa


    Not _quite_ enough information.

    >> Could anyone explain me how is this possible? As far as I know a .arpa
    >> TLD domain name does not exist, I have been surfing the internet for
    >> years and this is the first time I see a .arpa domain


    That doesn't mean it doesn't exist. In fact, it goes back to the 1980s
    when DNS was introduced, and is in _constant_ use - you just don't use
    that information. Other people do.

    BRIEFLY: The Internet works on IP addresses, not names. Humans find it
    easier to work with names. As of the middle of this month, there are
    approximately 2352 _million_ IP addresses in use. No one server can keep
    track of all of that. Likewise there are about 74400 different primary
    networks out there (probably several tens of millions of domains).

    When you want to have your browser connect to www.example.com, an
    application in your computer's operating system asks a name server what
    the IP address is for that name. The name server may or may not know, BUT
    it knows how to ask one of 13 "root servers". The root servers don't know
    either, but they tell the name server to ask the server that knows .com.
    That server, knows that the servers that know about "example.com" are
    "ns1.example.com", and "ns2.example.com" at address 192.0.2.18 and
    192.0.2.35 - go ask them. So the name server _then_ asks ns1.example.com
    "what's the address of www.example.com" and gets told the "right" answer
    which it then tells your computer. This is called a distributed database.

    NOW, how do you find the hostname of 192.0.2.98? Who do you ask? Same
    answer - the computer asks the name server, but to avoid confusion, it
    gives the address as 98.2.0.192.in-addr.arpa. Notice how when you were
    looking at hostnames, the (what do you want to call it - family name) is
    at the right side. ".com" Below that, is "example.com". Below that is
    "www.example.com". The in-addr.arpa domain is set up the same way,
    with the "family" name on the right ".in-addr.arpa", then "192.in-addr.arpa",
    then "0.192.in-addr.arpa", and so on. The name server would ask the root
    server, be referred to the "in-addr.arpa" server, which would then refer it
    to the "192.in-addr.arpa" server and so on. This _seems_ as if it would
    be slow, but the name servers remember the intermediate steps - so that
    next time someone asks for "ftp.example.com" - it knows to ask the two
    "example.com" servers directly without wasting the intermediate steps.

    >> I have a basic idea of what the ARPA network was, the internet
    >> foundation or something like that,
    >> but it does not exist anymore which makes all this even more confusing
    >> (??)


    ARPA is now DARPA - and yes it exists. But the name of the domain wasn't
    changed just to prevent the hassle. Ask your wife or mother how much crap
    she went through when her name changed when she got married. TONS of new
    paperwork.

    >Name Address: 130.118.2.81.in-addr.arpa


    IP address 81.2.118.130 - and the id10t who is running the name server
    doesn't feel it required to have it configured properly. 80.0.0.0 to
    91.255.255.255 is assigned to the "European Regional Registry", or "RIPE".
    According to RIPE, 81.2.64.0 - 81.2.127.255 belongs to "Andrews & Arnold
    Ltd" in Bracknell, Berks. in the UK, and the actual address is sub-assigned
    to "The Religious Society of Friends" London office.

    Old guy
     
    Moe Trin, Aug 23, 2006
    #3
  4. melic

    melic Guest

    Re: .arpa IP? extra information

    Ok thank you for the explanation Old guy, I get an idea, but still do not
    understand how do I get a .arpa domain for myself? I know I can buy a
    ..com, .net and so on, I just have never seen registrar selling .arpa
    domains.

    Or how I can get my home router to show a .arpa address thats something
    that
    I would like to do, I like the domain name.


    >
    >> Name Address: 130.118.2.81.in-addr.arpa

    >
    > IP address 81.2.118.130 - and the id10t who is running the name server
    > doesn't feel it required to have it configured properly.


    Whats wrong with the configuration?
     
    melic, Aug 23, 2006
    #4
  5. melic

    Moe Trin Guest

    Re: .arpa IP? extra information

    On 23 Aug 200600, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.computer.security, in article
    <op.tepvw6d1jytukk@ascaron>, melic wrote:

    >Ok thank you for the explanation Old guy, I get an idea, but still do not
    >understand how do I get a .arpa domain for myself? I know I can buy a
    >..com, .net and so on, I just have never seen registrar selling .arpa
    >domains.


    You don't. They are an administrative domain - the sole purpose is to
    use it to translate an IP address to a host address. Look at the example
    again - how would the name server know to ask the right server out on the
    Internet which host address goes to that IP? Are you going to have it
    ask each of the tens of millions of domain DNS servers? How do you even
    know the address of those servers? That's the purpose of the in-addr.arpa
    domain.

    >Or how I can get my home router to show a .arpa address thats something
    >that I would like to do, I like the domain name.


    You'd have to have an authoritative name server designated by a registrar
    so that people would know to ask your system - and then have it
    mis-configured to return the bogus name. ICANN, which owns that domain is
    not handing it out for registrations. You may want to look at
    http://www.icann.org/registrars/accredited-list.html - and you'll notice
    that the in-addr.arpa is not available.

    >>> Name Address: 130.118.2.81.in-addr.arpa

    >>
    >> IP address 81.2.118.130 - and the id10t who is running the name server
    >> doesn't feel it required to have it configured properly.

    >
    >Whats wrong with the configuration?


    The answer is wrong. The hostname of the computer using 81.2.118.130 is
    something entirely different - I have no idea what it might actually be,
    although it is _possible_ that the domain portion of the name might be
    quaker.org.uk. Instead, this id10t has it set to reply into an endless
    loop. My system asks "what is the name of 130.118.2.81.in-addr.arpa", and
    the answer comes back "130.118.2.81.in-addr.arpa" which is false. Many
    mail servers will automatically drop a connection when they get such an
    answer. Paranoid firewalls may do likewise. The address doesn't appear
    to be currently listed on blocklists I have access to, but I wonder
    how long that will continue.

    For further reading, see the following RFCs available on the web:

    1034 Domain names - concepts and facilities. P.V. Mockapetris.
    November 1987. (Format: TXT=129180 bytes) (Obsoletes RFC0973,
    RFC0882, RFC0883) (Updated by RFC1101, RFC1183, RFC1348, RFC1876,
    RFC1982, RFC2065, RFC2181, RFC2308, RFC2535, RFC4033, RFC4034,
    RFC4035, RFC4343, RFC4035, RFC4592) (Also STD0013) (Status: STANDARD)

    1035 Domain names - implementation and specification. P.V.
    Mockapetris. November 1987. (Format: TXT=125626 bytes) (Obsoletes
    RFC0973, RFC0882, RFC0883) (Updated by RFC1101, RFC1183, RFC1348,
    RFC1876, RFC1982, RFC1995, RFC1996, RFC2065, RFC2136, RFC2181,
    RFC2137, RFC2308, RFC2535, RFC2845, RFC3425, RFC3658, RFC4033,
    RFC4034, RFC4035, RFC4343, RFC2137, RFC2845, RFC3425, RFC3658,
    RFC4035, RFC4033) (Also STD0013) (Status: STANDARD)

    1536 Common DNS Implementation Errors and Suggested Fixes. A. Kumar,
    J. Postel, C. Neuman, P. Danzig, S. Miller. October 1993. (Format:
    TXT=25476 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)

    1912 Common DNS Operational and Configuration Errors. D. Barr.
    February 1996. (Format: TXT=38252 bytes) (Obsoletes RFC1537) (Status:
    INFORMATIONAL)

    As you can see, the documentation is quite extensive - heck, there are
    even several well known (in the business) books on the subject, such as
    "DNS & BIND" 4th edition, ISBN 0-596-00158-4 (622 pgs) which is probably
    the best known of the bunch.

    Old guy
     
    Moe Trin, Aug 23, 2006
    #5
  6. melic

    melic Guest

    Re: .arpa IP? extra information

    Thanks all my problems solved for free :)
     
    melic, Aug 23, 2006
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Pascal

    Arpa address

    Pascal, May 17, 2006, in forum: Computer Security
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    1,157
    Moe Trin
    May 20, 2006
  2. AntiSpamBloke

    e164.arpa or e164.org?

    AntiSpamBloke, Sep 17, 2007, in forum: UK VOIP
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    1,003
    News Reader
    Sep 21, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page