Aren't rechargeables for high current applications?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by John Doe, Dec 5, 2008.

  1. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    (Crossposted, please feel free to trim)


    Since the worth of a NiMH rechargeable battery is determined by how
    many alkalines you avoid buying and disposing of, what's the point of
    low leakage current NiMHs?

    In other words. Why would you care if the NiMH still has a charge after
    one year? Doesn't that negate the value of being able to recharge the
    battery hundreds of times? Why not use an alkaline if it needs to last
    for one year?

    Or, is ordinary/current NiMH leakage current problematic even for high
    current uses, and battery makers are trying to correct that?

    Thanks.



    --
    The first big front wheel rollerblades.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/27532210@N04/3056505603
     
    John Doe, Dec 5, 2008
    #1
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  2. John Doe

    Phil Allison Guest

    "John Doe"
    >
    > Since the worth of a NiMH rechargeable battery is determined by how
    > many alkalines you avoid buying and disposing of, what's the point of
    > low leakage current NiMHs?


    ** Obvious.

    The things retain charge for much longer so need less regular attention from
    owners and are suitable for use with occasionally used items.


    > In other words. Why would you care if the NiMH still has a charge after
    > one year?



    ** Cos you can use them straight away - fool.


    > Doesn't that negate the value of being able to recharge the
    > battery hundreds of times?


    ** Wot complete insanity is this ?


    > Why not use an alkaline if it needs to last
    > for one year?



    ** A torch or a camera may sit idle for long periods, you do not know WHEN
    you are going to need them next - so a rechargeable cell that has a long
    charge retention time is a real plus over one that does not.

    Fact is, the short and variable self discharge periods of NiCd ( and some
    MiMH ) cells is their biggest drawback - resulting in the early demise of
    the vast majority of NiCd packs from accidental overcharging the cells that
    had longer retention than the others.



    ....... Phil
     
    Phil Allison, Dec 5, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. John Doe

    SMS Guest

    John Doe wrote:
    > (Crossposted, please feel free to trim)
    >
    >
    > Since the worth of a NiMH rechargeable battery is determined by how
    > many alkalines you avoid buying and disposing of, what's the point of
    > low leakage current NiMHs?


    For cameras, people may use them only every couple of months for most of
    the year, then use it a lot during a couple of weeks, but alkalines
    perform especially poorly in cameras due to their high internal resistance.

    Yes, for flashlights, alkalines are often fine. But now a lot of people
    use LED flashlights as bicycle lights for commuting, needing to charge
    then often.

    Low leakage NiMH batteries are pretty cheap now, on sale they're around
    $1.50, so they're only about 2x the price of name brand AA alkalines at
    Costco.
    \
     
    SMS, Dec 5, 2008
    #3
  4. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    Do you insult people in person like you insult people over the
    Internet, Phil? Were you an orphan? Don't know about the average
    Australian, but seems there are a few too many like Phil (another
    Australian foul mouth apparently with no self control is Rod Speed
    in the storage group). I'm genuinely curious. Maybe they come from
    some small backwards tribal region, like where their customs are the
    reverse of normal people.


    "Phil Allison" <philallison tpg.com.au> wrote:

    > Path: flpi142.ffdc.sbc.com!flph199.ffdc.sbc.com!prodigy.com!flph200.ffdc.sbc.com!prodigy.net!newsfeed2.telusplanet.net!newsfeed.telus.net!feeder.erje.net!news2.arglkargh.de!news.karotte.org!fu-berlin.de!uni-berlin.de!individual.net!not-for-mail
    > From: "Phil Allison" <philallison tpg.com.au>
    > Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital,sci.electronics.design
    > Subject: Re: Aren't rechargeables for high current applications?
    > Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2008 12:47:53 +1100
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    >
    >
    > "John Doe"
    >>
    >> Since the worth of a NiMH rechargeable battery is determined by how
    >> many alkalines you avoid buying and disposing of, what's the point of
    >> low leakage current NiMHs?

    >
    > ** Obvious.
    >
    > The things retain charge for much longer so need less regular attention from
    > owners and are suitable for use with occasionally used items.
    >
    >
    >> In other words. Why would you care if the NiMH still has a charge after
    >> one year?

    >
    >
    > ** Cos you can use them straight away - fool.
    >
    >
    >> Doesn't that negate the value of being able to recharge the
    >> battery hundreds of times?

    >
    > ** Wot complete insanity is this ?
    >
    >
    >> Why not use an alkaline if it needs to last
    >> for one year?

    >
    >
    > ** A torch or a camera may sit idle for long periods, you do not know WHEN
    > you are going to need them next - so a rechargeable cell that has a long
    > charge retention time is a real plus over one that does not.
    >
    > Fact is, the short and variable self discharge periods of NiCd ( and some
    > MiMH ) cells is their biggest drawback - resulting in the early demise of
    > the vast majority of NiCd packs from accidental overcharging the cells that
    > had longer retention than the others.
    >
    >
    >
    > ...... Phil
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >




    --
    The first big front wheel rollerblades.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/27532210 N04/3056505603
    Google Groups is destroying the USENET archive.
     
    John Doe, Dec 5, 2008
    #4
  5. On Dec 5, 11:33 am, John Doe <> wrote:
    > (Crossposted, please feel free to trim)
    >
    > Since the worth of a NiMH rechargeable battery is determined by how
    > many alkalines you avoid buying and disposing of


    That's just *one* sense of worth, there are others.

    > what's the point of low leakage current NiMHs?


    Obviously, they hold their charge longer than ordinary NiMH's. That's
    a good and useful thing for many people and many purposes.

    > In other words. Why would you care if the NiMH still has a charge after
    > one year? Doesn't that negate the value of being able to recharge the
    > battery hundreds of times? Why not use an alkaline if it needs to last
    > for one year?


    There comes a point where if you use the item so infrequently, that
    can indeed be the case.
    But there are countless usage variations you are not considering.

    > Or, is ordinary/current NiMH leakage current problematic even for high
    > current uses, and battery makers are trying to correct that?


    Pretty much, yes.
    Unless you are using an item say better than once a week, you will be
    losing a significant amount of charge, and that can be really
    annoying.

    Dave.
     
    David L. Jones, Dec 5, 2008
    #5
  6. John Doe

    Guest

    On Dec 4, 5:52 pm, SMS <> wrote:
    > John Doe wrote:
    > > (Crossposted, please feel free to trim)

    >
    > > Since the worth of a NiMH rechargeable battery is determined by how
    > > many alkalines you avoid buying and disposing of, what's the point of
    > > low leakage current NiMHs?

    >
    > For cameras, people may use them only every couple of months for most of
    > the year, then use it a lot during a couple of weeks, but alkalines
    > perform especially poorly in cameras due to their high internal resistance.
    >
    > Yes, for flashlights, alkalines are often fine. But now a lot of people
    > use LED flashlights as bicycle lights for commuting, needing to charge
    > then often.
    >
    > Low leakage NiMH batteries are pretty cheap now, on sale they're around
    > $1.50, so they're only about 2x the price of name brand AA alkalines at
    > Costco.
    > \


    I use ENELOOPs, but a Costco AA cell costs about 25 cents. So actually
    I use both, but try to use the ENELOOPS as much as possible.

    Now granted, I used the price of the house brand, but the capacity of
    alkaline batteries don't vary much between brands the last time I saw
    a capacity test done. I've even used Korean made batteries at the
    dollar store in a pinch. About the only cell brand I find that is not
    competitive in capacity is Ultralast. Now granted, I've got those
    batteries for under a dime at times.
     
    , Dec 5, 2008
    #6
  7. John Doe

    Phil Allison Guest

    "John Doe"

    ( snip load of top posted, puerile drivel)


    ** Anyone as colossally stupid as YOU pal, needs to develop a thicker
    hide.


    Piss off - fool.


    ...... Phil
     
    Phil Allison, Dec 5, 2008
    #7
  8. John Doe

    J. Clarke Guest

    John Doe wrote:
    > (Crossposted, please feel free to trim)
    >
    >
    > Since the worth of a NiMH rechargeable battery is determined by how
    > many alkalines you avoid buying and disposing of, what's the point
    > of
    > low leakage current NiMHs?
    >
    > In other words. Why would you care if the NiMH still has a charge
    > after one year? Doesn't that negate the value of being able to
    > recharge the battery hundreds of times? Why not use an alkaline if
    > it
    > needs to last for one year?


    It's bloody inconvenient to have your clock or keyboard run down after
    3 monts because of internal leakage in the battery.

    > Or, is ordinary/current NiMH leakage current problematic even for
    > high
    > current uses, and battery makers are trying to correct that?
    >
    > Thanks.


    --
    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 5, 2008
    #8
  9. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    "Phil Allison" <> wrote:
    > "John Doe"


    > ( snip load of top posted, puerile drivel)


    Appears to be a same dialect. Okay, so I see Phil is obsessed with
    Sylvia in the Australian legal group. So maybe Phil and Rod are the
    same, or brothers, or maybe bedfellows.

    > ** Anyone as colossally stupid as YOU pal, needs to develop a
    > thicker hide.


    Do you have a Crocodile Dundee complex, Phil?

    > Piss off - fool.


    Are you in a movie, Phil?
















    >
    >
    >
    > ..... Phil
    >
    >
    >
    > Path: flpi141.ffdc.sbc.com!flph199.ffdc.sbc.com!prodigy.com!flph200.ffdc.sbc.com!prodigy.net!newshub.sdsu.edu!feeder.erje.net!news.musoftware.de!wum.musoftware.de!fu-berlin.de!uni-berlin.de!individual.net!not-for-mail
    > From: "Phil Allison" <>
    > Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital,sci.electronics.design
    > Subject: Re: Aren't rechargeables for high current applications?
    > Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2008 16:14:50 +1100
    > Lines: 17
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    John Doe, Dec 5, 2008
    #9
  10. John Doe

    Phil Allison Guest

    "John Dope"

    ( snip another whole load of top posted, puerile drivel )


    ** Anyone as monumentally stupid as YOU pal, needs to develop a very thick
    hide.

    To go with that very think head of yours.

    Piss the hell off - you PITA trolling fuckwit.
     
    Phil Allison, Dec 5, 2008
    #10
  11. John Doe

    ASAAR Guest

    On Thu, 4 Dec 2008 18:18:10 -0800, BobW wrote:

    >> Low leakage NiMH batteries are pretty cheap now, on sale they're around
    >> $1.50, so they're only about 2x the price of name brand AA alkalines at
    >> Costco.


    Leave it to SMS, the so-called battery "expert" to inflate prices
    of the AA batteries that he loathes, when he somehow always can find
    much lower Li-Ion prices than the rest of us can. Name brand AA
    alkalines, such as those from Sanyo, Panasonic, RayOVac, Maxell and
    others can often be found in larger camera & electronic stores,
    supermarkets and Rite-Aid type stores for prices ranging from 20 to
    25 cents each, not the 75 cents claimed by the "expert". Some of
    these stores have permanently low battery prices. With others you
    wait for sales (Pathmark == frequent, Rite-Aid == infrequent). If
    you don't plan ahead and only buy 2AA or 4AA blister packed
    alkalines as needed, then yes, you pay higher battery prices.


    > I really like these so-called hybrid NiMH batteries. I use the Hybrio brand.
    >
    > Certainly for cameras, the alkalines are terrible due to the high current
    > demands. It's nice being able to grab a camera that I haven't used for
    > months and have it work. I could never do that with conventional NiMH
    > batteries. I'm even using them in my flashlights now that I know they won't
    > be dead after sitting for a long time.


    Low self-discharge NiMH cells such as Hybrios, Hybrids, Eneloops,
    etc. are excellent and the best types for many purposes, but not for
    all. You can't make that generic statement, that alkalines are
    terrible for use in cameras because there's a tremendous difference
    in the power demands of different cameras. The worst possible case
    is when shots are taken with the flash and the LCD is used. As you
    suspect, some cameras do very poorly when powered by alkalines, but
    many (in cameras from Canon, Fuji, Nikon, etc.) can provide hundreds
    of shots from a set of alkalines even when the flash is used, up to
    and beyond 1,500 shots when the flash is not used.

    Bogus battery information can also color your expectations. One
    example is Canon's A570IS camera. Canon's manual states that it
    should be able to get 120 shots (CIPA test, using flash and LCD) and
    400 shots (no flash and using viewfinder) from a pair of AA alkaline
    cells. I tested that camera and got even more shots than Canon
    claimed. SMS on the other hand frequently stated in this newsgroup
    that the A570IS did worse than this by an order of magnitude. Even
    today his battery data website claims :

    > I lent an AA powered camera (Canon A570IS) to a relative that tried
    > to use alkaline AA batteries while on a cruise. She reported getting
    > about ten pictures per set of batteries. When I inquired if this was
    > normal on rec.photo.digital I got a slew of responses and every one of
    > them reported similar results with alkaline batteries.


    Whether bogus information or a blatant lie, the responses weren't
    similar and unanimous. IIRC, he also stated that she then purchased
    new alkalines and got the same terrible battery life. This couldn't
    happen unless that particular camera was defective, and it's very
    unlikely that it was, since he said he'd check the camera when it
    was returned, but he never reported any findings. And despite the
    above quote, which if true would indicate an unacceptable camera
    with possibly the worst battery performance ever, SMS has since
    recommended the A570IS in this newsgroup many times.

    As you say, the hybrid type NiMH batteries are good choices for
    flashlights, but with two caveats. The first is that if the
    flashlight user waits for the light to dim before recharging the
    batteries, there's a chance that one or more cells might become
    reverse-cell damaged. The more cells that are used, the greater the
    possibility. Two cell flashlights should be safe, unless they're
    the more expensive types using voltage regulators. Flashlights
    using four or more cells provide the greatest risk. The second is
    that for emergency use, alkalines provide a good warning that the
    batteries need to be replaced because of their slow, gradual voltage
    decline. When NiMH batteries become depleted, the light falloff can
    be extremely rapid, giving you little time to find a set of
    replacement batteries. For most people using flashlights around the
    home or auto though, this shouldn't be a significant concern.
     
    ASAAR, Dec 5, 2008
    #11
  12. ASAAR wrote:
    []
    > Low self-discharge NiMH cells such as Hybrios, Hybrids, Eneloops,
    > etc. are excellent and the best types for many purposes, but not for
    > all. You can't make that generic statement, that alkalines are
    > terrible for use in cameras because there's a tremendous difference
    > in the power demands of different cameras. The worst possible case
    > is when shots are taken with the flash and the LCD is used. As you
    > suspect, some cameras do very poorly when powered by alkalines, but
    > many (in cameras from Canon, Fuji, Nikon, etc.) can provide hundreds
    > of shots from a set of alkalines even when the flash is used, up to
    > and beyond 1,500 shots when the flash is not used.


    How well do 2000mAh Eneloops stand up to fast charging? I have a
    so-called 1 hour charger which has a stated charge current of 2A, and
    negative delta-V protection.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 5, 2008
    #12
  13. John Doe

    ASAAR Guest

    On Fri, 05 Dec 2008 13:55:04 GMT, David J Taylor wrote:

    >> Low self-discharge NiMH cells such as Hybrios, Hybrids, Eneloops,
    >> etc. are excellent and the best types for many purposes, but not for
    >> all. You can't make that generic statement, that alkalines are
    >> terrible for use in cameras because there's a tremendous difference
    >> in the power demands of different cameras. The worst possible case
    >> is when shots are taken with the flash and the LCD is used. As you
    >> suspect, some cameras do very poorly when powered by alkalines, but
    >> many (in cameras from Canon, Fuji, Nikon, etc.) can provide hundreds
    >> of shots from a set of alkalines even when the flash is used, up to
    >> and beyond 1,500 shots when the flash is not used.

    >
    > How well do 2000mAh Eneloops stand up to fast charging? I have a
    > so-called 1 hour charger which has a stated charge current of 2A, and
    > negative delta-V protection.


    I can't say because I haven't used my fast (30 minute & 60 minute,
    neg. delta-V) chargers with Eneloops and other low self-discharge
    NiMH cells. My guess, though, is that they'll do at least as well
    as standard NiMH cells and possibly better. This is based on two
    reasons. First, when I first purchased them, the manufacturer's
    literature stated that they could be charged with any "well
    designed" battery charger, and there was no indication that slower
    chargers would be preferred.

    The second reason is based on what a number of photographers in
    DPReview's Lighting Technique forum have said about using Eneloops
    in hot shoe mounted flash units. They report that despite the lower
    capacity (2,000 mAh vs 2,700mAh), Eneloops provide as many flashes
    per charge as the higher capacity standard NiMH cells. They've
    thought that the reason is that the lower internal resistance
    results in less energy wasted in battery heat losses, and have also
    noted that this allows the flashes to be used more rapidly without
    causing the flash units to shut down. This lower internal
    resistance may also reduce the internal heating of Eneloops while
    they're being charged. This is only conjecture, as I haven't heard
    of anyone testing this hypothesis.

    So far there I haven't used quick chargers with my Eneloops and
    Hybrids, but if there was a need for it, I'd have no qualms about
    doing so.
     
    ASAAR, Dec 5, 2008
    #13
  14. John Doe

    Guest

    On Dec 5, 8:41 am, ASAAR <> wrote:
    >
    > Whether bogus information or a blatant lie, the responses weren't
    > similar and unanimous. IIRC, he also stated that she then purchased
    > new alkalines and got the same terrible battery life. This couldn't
    > happen unless that particular camera was defective, and it's very
    > unlikely that it was, since he said he'd check the camera when it
    > was returned, but he never reported any findings. And despite the
    > above quote, which if true would indicate an unacceptable camera
    > with possibly the worst battery performance ever, SMS has since
    > recommended the A570IS in this newsgroup many times.


    There are cheap Chinese knock-off batteries that go to great lengths
    to look a lot like Duracells or Energizers.
    At a quick glance, they look the same. However, even new, they can't
    even get a camera to turn on. Internal resistance is that high.
    Probably bottom of the barrel carbon/zinc batteries masquerading as
    alkalines.
     
    , Dec 5, 2008
    #14
  15. John Doe

    Rich Grise Guest

    On Fri, 05 Dec 2008 01:33:23 +0000, John Doe wrote:
    >
    > Since the worth of a NiMH rechargeable battery is determined by how many
    > alkalines you avoid buying and disposing of, what's the point of low
    > leakage current NiMHs?
    >
    > In other words. Why would you care if the NiMH still has a charge after
    > one year? Doesn't that negate the value of being able to recharge the
    > battery hundreds of times? Why not use an alkaline if it needs to last for
    > one year?
    >
    > Or, is ordinary/current NiMH leakage current problematic even for high
    > current uses, and battery makers are trying to correct that?


    FWIW, I'll never waste my money on NiMH's again. I bought a "smart"
    charger that came with 4 NiMH's once, and was kind of impressed.
    Unfortunately, my camera (a Fuji) has a terrible current drain when
    it's off, presumably to keep the RTC up. So, I'd pick up the cam,
    turn it on, and the NiMHs were dead. So, I'd get the next pair off
    its shelf, slap the discharged pair in the charger, and be on my
    merry way. Then, freshly charged, bu thaving sat for a couple of
    weeks, they were dead. Finally one day, I had no charged NiMHs -
    I "charged" 4 of them, and NONE OF THEM would make the camera go.

    I mean, pulled them right out of the charger, put them in the camera, and
    nothing, like their shelf life was zero.

    So I trashed the whole lot, bought a couple of AA alkalines, and
    they're still going after almost a year.

    BTW, I've never heard of alkalines having a "high internal resistance" -
    IME, they're almost as hot as Nicads.

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
    Rich Grise, Dec 5, 2008
    #15
  16. writes:

    > On Dec 5, 8:41 am, ASAAR <> wrote:
    >>
    >> Whether bogus information or a blatant lie, the responses weren't
    >> similar and unanimous. IIRC, he also stated that she then purchased
    >> new alkalines and got the same terrible battery life. This couldn't
    >> happen unless that particular camera was defective, and it's very
    >> unlikely that it was, since he said he'd check the camera when it
    >> was returned, but he never reported any findings. And despite the
    >> above quote, which if true would indicate an unacceptable camera
    >> with possibly the worst battery performance ever, SMS has since
    >> recommended the A570IS in this newsgroup many times.

    >
    > There are cheap Chinese knock-off batteries that go to great lengths
    > to look a lot like Duracells or Energizers.
    > At a quick glance, they look the same. However, even new, they can't
    > even get a camera to turn on. Internal resistance is that high.
    > Probably bottom of the barrel carbon/zinc batteries masquerading as
    > alkalines.


    I gather a lot of the D cells have AA's inside.

    --

    John Devereux
     
    John Devereux, Dec 5, 2008
    #16
  17. ASAAR wrote:
    []
    > So far there I haven't used quick chargers with my Eneloops and
    > Hybrids, but if there was a need for it, I'd have no qualms about
    > doing so.


    Thanks for that - your observation and conclusions make sense to me. I
    have become sufficiently dissatisfied with the poor shelf-life on
    conventional Ni-MH cells that I have located a UK supplier (none of the
    normal places I use had them, but Amazon did), and ordered a set to try.
    Both of the devices where I might use the cells are very intermittent use
    devices, so long charge retention is important.

    I'll keep a careful finger on the temperature at the first charge,
    providing the cells don't explode first! I was unable to locate a
    manufacturer's data sheet with recommended charge rates, and that was
    annoying.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 5, 2008
    #17
  18. John Devereux wrote:
    []
    > I gather a lot of the D cells have AA's inside.


    I thought that most D Ni-MH cells were made like that?
    At least, all I've ever seen.
    Reputable makes.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 5, 2008
    #18
  19. John Doe

    Dave Cohen Guest

    Rich Grise wrote:
    > On Fri, 05 Dec 2008 01:33:23 +0000, John Doe wrote:
    >> Since the worth of a NiMH rechargeable battery is determined by how many
    >> alkalines you avoid buying and disposing of, what's the point of low
    >> leakage current NiMHs?
    >>
    >> In other words. Why would you care if the NiMH still has a charge after
    >> one year? Doesn't that negate the value of being able to recharge the
    >> battery hundreds of times? Why not use an alkaline if it needs to last for
    >> one year?
    >>
    >> Or, is ordinary/current NiMH leakage current problematic even for high
    >> current uses, and battery makers are trying to correct that?

    >
    > FWIW, I'll never waste my money on NiMH's again. I bought a "smart"
    > charger that came with 4 NiMH's once, and was kind of impressed.
    > Unfortunately, my camera (a Fuji) has a terrible current drain when
    > it's off, presumably to keep the RTC up. So, I'd pick up the cam,
    > turn it on, and the NiMHs were dead. So, I'd get the next pair off
    > its shelf, slap the discharged pair in the charger, and be on my
    > merry way. Then, freshly charged, bu thaving sat for a couple of
    > weeks, they were dead. Finally one day, I had no charged NiMHs -
    > I "charged" 4 of them, and NONE OF THEM would make the camera go.
    >
    > I mean, pulled them right out of the charger, put them in the camera, and
    > nothing, like their shelf life was zero.
    >
    > So I trashed the whole lot, bought a couple of AA alkalines, and
    > they're still going after almost a year.
    >
    > BTW, I've never heard of alkalines having a "high internal resistance" -
    > IME, they're almost as hot as Nicads.
    >
    > Good Luck!
    > Rich
    >

    Most people seem to be aware of alkalines having a higher internal
    resistance then either NiMH or NiCD.
    Since literally millions of people are happily using NiMH in their
    cameras, it might occur to you that you have a problem with the camera.
    My guess would be it's unduly sensitive to the lower voltage of NiMH,
    but one would need to do further testing.
    Dave Cohen
     
    Dave Cohen, Dec 5, 2008
    #19
  20. John Doe

    J. Clarke Guest

    Rich Grise wrote:
    > On Fri, 05 Dec 2008 01:33:23 +0000, John Doe wrote:
    >>
    >> Since the worth of a NiMH rechargeable battery is determined by how
    >> many alkalines you avoid buying and disposing of, what's the point
    >> of low leakage current NiMHs?
    >>
    >> In other words. Why would you care if the NiMH still has a charge
    >> after one year? Doesn't that negate the value of being able to
    >> recharge the battery hundreds of times? Why not use an alkaline if
    >> it needs to last for one year?
    >>
    >> Or, is ordinary/current NiMH leakage current problematic even for
    >> high current uses, and battery makers are trying to correct that?

    >
    > FWIW, I'll never waste my money on NiMH's again. I bought a "smart"
    > charger that came with 4 NiMH's once, and was kind of impressed.
    > Unfortunately, my camera (a Fuji) has a terrible current drain when
    > it's off, presumably to keep the RTC up. So, I'd pick up the cam,
    > turn it on, and the NiMHs were dead. So, I'd get the next pair off
    > its shelf, slap the discharged pair in the charger, and be on my
    > merry way. Then, freshly charged, bu thaving sat for a couple of
    > weeks, they were dead. Finally one day, I had no charged NiMHs -
    > I "charged" 4 of them, and NONE OF THEM would make the camera go.
    >
    > I mean, pulled them right out of the charger, put them in the
    > camera,
    > and nothing, like their shelf life was zero.


    Sounds to me like you have a crap charger.

    > So I trashed the whole lot, bought a couple of AA alkalines, and
    > they're still going after almost a year.
    >
    > BTW, I've never heard of alkalines having a "high internal
    > resistance" - IME, they're almost as hot as Nicads.
    >
    > Good Luck!
    > Rich


    --
    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 5, 2008
    #20
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