Are lithium AA 1.5V or 1.7V?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by james, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. james

    james Guest

    Has anyone tried lithium AA batteries in digital camera?

    I have one set of lithium AA that measures 1.7V. I also see lithium AA
    advertised as 1.5V but I read somewhere that lithium battery is always 1.7V.
    So I'm confused.

    So are some lithium 1.5V, some 1.7V? I would be hesitant to put 1.7V
    batteries in the camera; they may damage the camera.
     
    james, Nov 18, 2010
    #1
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  2. james

    SMS Guest

    On 11/18/2010 2:40 PM, james wrote:
    > Has anyone tried lithium AA batteries in digital camera?
    >
    > I have one set of lithium AA that measures 1.7V. I also see lithium AA
    > advertised as 1.5V but I read somewhere that lithium battery is always
    > 1.7V. So I'm confused.
    >
    > So are some lithium 1.5V, some 1.7V? I would be hesitant to put 1.7V
    > batteries in the camera; they may damage the camera.


    1.7V. The camera will operate from a wide range of voltages. Zn/MnO2
    batteries are 1.5V, NiMH are 1.2V, and lithium are 1.7V. They all work.
    the circuitry in the camera includes a voltage regulator.
     
    SMS, Nov 18, 2010
    #2
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  3. james

    SMS Guest

    On 11/18/2010 3:02 PM, SMS wrote:
    > On 11/18/2010 2:40 PM, james wrote:
    >> Has anyone tried lithium AA batteries in digital camera?
    >>
    >> I have one set of lithium AA that measures 1.7V. I also see lithium AA
    >> advertised as 1.5V but I read somewhere that lithium battery is always
    >> 1.7V. So I'm confused.
    >>
    >> So are some lithium 1.5V, some 1.7V? I would be hesitant to put 1.7V
    >> batteries in the camera; they may damage the camera.

    >
    > 1.7V. The camera will operate from a wide range of voltages. Zn/MnO2
    > batteries are 1.5V, NiMH are 1.2V, and lithium are 1.7V. They all work.
    > the circuitry in the camera includes a voltage regulator.


    Forgot to say, except in cameras that allow you to tell the camera which
    type of batteries you put in, battery-life indicators not be all that
    accurate on AA powered cameras.

    If it's a Canon camera and it supports CHDK, then you can get a more
    accurate battery level indicator.

    I.e. I have two Canon A570 cameras (AA powered). Normally you don't get
    much warning between the indication to change the batteries and the
    camera no longer working. CHDK solves this problem. IMVAIO, CHDK can be
    a deciding factor between choosing a Canon camera versus a competing
    camera from another manufacturer. I'm a bit biased here because I helped
    write a lot of the CHDK documentation.
     
    SMS, Nov 18, 2010
    #3
  4. On Thu, 18 Nov 2010 15:08:22 -0800, SMS <> wrote:

    >I'm a bit biased here because I helped
    >write a lot of the CHDK documentation.


    That's a fucking lie. You only heard that it has a battery meter in it, you
    don't even own a camera that uses it, and that's as close as you've ever
    come to anything associated with CHDK. You've never written even one word
    of the documentation, as clearly proved in the CHDK Wiki history pages.
    People have asked you questions about it for years, and you've either been
    1) DEAD WRONG, proving you've never used it, or 2) perfectly silent,
    pretending you didn't even see the questions so as to expose yourself for
    the piece-of-shit liar and psychotic that you are.
     
    Outing Trolls is FUN!, Nov 19, 2010
    #4
  5. In article <4ce5ab6f$0$15429$c3e8da3$>,
    "james" <> wrote:

    > Has anyone tried lithium AA batteries in digital camera?
    >
    > I have one set of lithium AA that measures 1.7V. I also see lithium AA
    > advertised as 1.5V but I read somewhere that lithium battery is always 1.7V.
    > So I'm confused.
    >
    > So are some lithium 1.5V, some 1.7V? I would be hesitant to put 1.7V
    > batteries in the camera; they may damage the camera.


    Alkaline batteries vary greatly in voltage over time. Battery operated
    devices usually tolerate 1.0 to 1.7V.

    http://data.energizer.com/PDFs/alkaline_appman.pdf
    --
    I will not see posts or email from Google because I must filter them as spam
     
    Kevin McMurtrie, Nov 19, 2010
    #5
  6. james

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Nov 18, 10:40 pm, "james" <> wrote:
    > Has anyone tried lithium AA batteries in digital camera?
    >
    > I have one set of lithium AA that measures 1.7V. I also see lithium AA
    > advertised as 1.5V but I read somewhere that lithium battery is always 1.7V.
    > So I'm confused.
    >
    > So are some lithium 1.5V, some 1.7V? I would be hesitant to put 1.7V
    > batteries in the camera; they may damage the camera.



    There are different types of lithium battery.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_battery.
    The problem with putting in a slightly higher voltage battery can be
    the extra current that can be 'pulled'
    Some products recommend not using batteries other than those stated.
    I have an old canon motor drive which is for Alkaline 1.5 AA only.
    There's a warning about not using NiCd, which are only 1.2v but I
    assume the drive circuitry
    uses the internal resistance of a alkaline AA to limit the current,
    where as a 1.2 niCd will
    a much lower resistance allowing more current to flow and blowing the
    drive motor.
    Perhaps this wouldn't apply to a modern digicam, but as you say I'd
    think carefully about
    putting no recommend batteries in anything without understanding it.
    (vibrators included) ;-)
     
    Whisky-dave, Nov 19, 2010
    #6
  7. james

    SMS Guest

    On 11/19/2010 2:15 AM, Whisky-dave wrote:
    > On Nov 18, 10:40 pm, "james"<> wrote:
    >> Has anyone tried lithium AA batteries in digital camera?
    >>
    >> I have one set of lithium AA that measures 1.7V. I also see lithium AA
    >> advertised as 1.5V but I read somewhere that lithium battery is always 1.7V.
    >> So I'm confused.
    >>
    >> So are some lithium 1.5V, some 1.7V? I would be hesitant to put 1.7V
    >> batteries in the camera; they may damage the camera.

    >
    >
    > There are different types of lithium battery.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_battery.
    > The problem with putting in a slightly higher voltage battery can be
    > the extra current that can be 'pulled'
    > Some products recommend not using batteries other than those stated.
    > I have an old canon motor drive which is for Alkaline 1.5 AA only.
    > There's a warning about not using NiCd, which are only 1.2v but I
    > assume the drive circuitry
    > uses the internal resistance of a alkaline AA to limit the current,
    > where as a 1.2 niCd will
    > a much lower resistance allowing more current to flow and blowing the
    > drive motor.


    Wow, using the battery as a current limiter is a really bad idea. They
    could have put in a current limiting resistor at a trivial cos.
     
    SMS, Nov 19, 2010
    #7
  8. james

    SMS Guest

    On 11/19/2010 2:14 AM, bobwilliams wrote:

    > I have a little 5 year old Pentax P/S that accepts Lithium batteries and
    > the combo works great...lots of shooting time.
    > I have another Panasonic Lumix P/S and they say explicitly NOT to use
    > lithium batteries.
    > So my guess is that use of Lithium batteries is camera specific.
    > The manual should say if is OK or not.
    > Bob Williams


    Yeah, I've seen a few products advice against the use of lithium cells.
    Pretty weak design if the product a) can't work from 1.0 to 1.7V per
    cell, or b) doesn't have current limiting circuitry that allows the use
    of batteries with low internal resistance.

    Of course, to digress, there are many reasons why you're better off with
    proprietary Li-Ion packs than AA batteries in the first place.

    Google "nimh vs lithium ion" and it's the first result.

    All of my AA powered cameras are Canon now, and all have CHDK installed,
    and the battery level indicator is a big help. Doesn't solve the
    inherent problems with AA cells, but at least it helps you work around
    them. But my promotion of CHDK is also related to the fact that I helped
    a lot with the project's docs, so I'm a bit biased here.
     
    SMS, Nov 19, 2010
    #8
  9. james

    SMS Guest

    On 11/19/2010 2:15 AM, Whisky-dave wrote:
    > On Nov 18, 10:40 pm, "james"<> wrote:
    >> Has anyone tried lithium AA batteries in digital camera?
    >>
    >> I have one set of lithium AA that measures 1.7V. I also see lithium AA
    >> advertised as 1.5V but I read somewhere that lithium battery is always 1.7V.
    >> So I'm confused.
    >>
    >> So are some lithium 1.5V, some 1.7V? I would be hesitant to put 1.7V
    >> batteries in the camera; they may damage the camera.

    >
    >
    > There are different types of lithium battery.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_battery.
    > The problem with putting in a slightly higher voltage battery can be
    > the extra current that can be 'pulled'


    Actually this is wrong.

    The reason extra current can be 'pulled' is because of the internal
    resistance of the battery, not because of the voltage. Far more current
    can be 'pulled' from a 1.2V NiMH cell than a 1.5V alkaline cell. Also,
    for many devices, as the voltage goes up the current goes down because
    they're using an internal switching voltage regulator that can accept a
    wide range of voltages.

    Of course much of what's on Wikipedia is wrong, so this isn't
    surprising. No wonder it's an automatic F on research papers in high
    school or college if you cite Wikipedia as a reference.
     
    SMS, Nov 19, 2010
    #9
  10. james

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Nov 19, 10:58 am, SMS <> wrote:
    > On 11/19/2010 2:15 AM, Whisky-dave wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Nov 18, 10:40 pm, "james"<>  wrote:
    > >> Has anyone tried lithium AA batteries in digital camera?

    >
    > >> I have one set of lithium AA that measures 1.7V. I also see lithium AA
    > >> advertised as 1.5V but I read somewhere that lithium battery is always 1.7V.
    > >> So I'm confused.

    >
    > >> So are some lithium 1.5V, some 1.7V? I would be hesitant to put 1.7V
    > >> batteries in the camera; they may damage the camera.

    >
    > > There are different types of  lithium battery.

    >
    > >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_battery.
    > > The problem with putting in a slightly higher voltage battery can be
    > > the extra current that can be 'pulled'
    > >   Some products recommend not using batteries other than those stated..
    > > I have an old canon motor drive which is for Alkaline 1.5 AA only.
    > > There's a warning about not using NiCd, which are only 1.2v but I
    > > assume the drive circuitry
    > > uses the internal resistance of a alkaline AA to limit the current,
    > > where as a 1.2 niCd will
    > > a much lower resistance allowing more current to flow and blowing the
    > > drive motor.

    >
    > Wow, using the battery as a current limiter is a really bad idea. They
    > could have put in a current limiting resistor at a trivial cos.


    I'm not sure that would work as such a resistor would need to
    for want of a better word, use up power and that resistor might need
    to be physically
    rather large, like those in old wireless radios.
    If I wanted to use NiCds I could buy a replacement battery holder
    which I assume
    had such resistors or current limiters attached, but I never actual
    saw one for sale.


    http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/companies/canon/fdresources/shared/motordrivema/index1.htm
     
    Whisky-dave, Nov 19, 2010
    #10
  11. In message <4ce65a1d$0$1588$>, SMS
    <> writes

    >Of course, to digress, there are many reasons why you're better off
    >with proprietary Li-Ion packs than AA batteries in the first place.
    >
    >Google "nimh vs lithium ion" and it's the first result.


    Hmm, the first result I got was a forum discussion about mobile phone
    batteries dating back from 2003.

    <http://forums.wirelessadvisor.com/general-wireless-discussion/15809-nimh
    -vs-lithium-ion-which-superior.html>

    Did you expect the first Google result to be a pointer to your vanity
    website about lithium batteries, hoping people wouldn't notice the
    connection between your post and the link?

    I have three cameras that use AA cells and one that uses a proprietary
    Li battery pack, a Panasonic Lumix LX3. I have several sets of NiMH AA
    batteries and several chargers including ones that work off a car
    lighter socket, USB ports etc. as well as mains sockets and if needed I
    can borrow hand-cranked and solar cell AA chargers from a geeky friend
    of mine. Worst case I can buy alkaline AAs pretty much anywhere in the
    world if I had to.

    I have one, count 'em, one charger suitable for charging the LX3
    battery pack and it only works off a mains supply (100-240V). If that
    charger blows up or I lose it then I'm stuffed until I can buy another
    dedicated charger. As for spare battery packs I lucked out in that the
    LX3 does not check that the battery is actually made by Panasonic[0] and
    it will work with third-party battery packs so I was able to get a spare
    pack for only three times the cost of a set of four low-discharge AA
    NiMH batteries with twice the capacity.

    [0] I have read that later models such as the Lumix LX5 do not work
    with third-party battery packs but I don't know if that is simply FUD.
    --
    To reply, my gmail address is nojay1 Robert Sneddon
     
    Robert Sneddon, Nov 19, 2010
    #11
  12. james

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Nov 19, 11:10 am, SMS <> wrote:
    > On 11/19/2010 2:15 AM, Whisky-dave wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Nov 18, 10:40 pm, "james"<>  wrote:
    > >> Has anyone tried lithium AA batteries in digital camera?

    >
    > >> I have one set of lithium AA that measures 1.7V. I also see lithium AA
    > >> advertised as 1.5V but I read somewhere that lithium battery is always 1.7V.
    > >> So I'm confused.

    >
    > >> So are some lithium 1.5V, some 1.7V? I would be hesitant to put 1.7V
    > >> batteries in the camera; they may damage the camera.

    >
    > > There are different types of  lithium battery.

    >
    > >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_battery.
    > > The problem with putting in a slightly higher voltage battery can be
    > > the extra current that can be 'pulled'

    >
    > Actually this is wrong.
    >
    > The reason extra current can be 'pulled' is because of the internal
    > resistance of the battery, not because of the voltage.


    It can be either or both it depends on the ciruitry involved.

    >Far more current
    > can be 'pulled' from a 1.2V NiMH cell than a 1.5V alkaline cell.


    Can be, doesn't equate to will be.
    It depends on the circuit that's being driven.
    Passive circuits which digicams generally are would not if designed
    properly.


    Also,
    > for many devices, as the voltage goes up the current goes down because
    > they're using an internal switching voltage regulator that can accept a
    > wide range of voltages.


    That's not usually so true of lower voltage devices, most regulators
    require
    more voltage in than they 'give' out.

    >
    > Of course much of what's on Wikipedia is wrong, so this isn't
    > surprising. No wonder it's an automatic F on research papers in high
    > school or college if you cite Wikipedia as a reference.


    No it isn't.
    And I work in a university students are allowed to site wiki as a
    reference,
    but then again students should have more than one reference anyway.
     
    Whisky-dave, Nov 19, 2010
    #12
  13. james

    Dave Cohen Guest

    On 11/19/2010 5:58 AM, SMS wrote:
    > On 11/19/2010 2:15 AM, Whisky-dave wrote:
    >> On Nov 18, 10:40 pm, "james"<> wrote:
    >>> Has anyone tried lithium AA batteries in digital camera?
    >>>
    >>> I have one set of lithium AA that measures 1.7V. I also see lithium AA
    >>> advertised as 1.5V but I read somewhere that lithium battery is
    >>> always 1.7V.
    >>> So I'm confused.
    >>>
    >>> So are some lithium 1.5V, some 1.7V? I would be hesitant to put 1.7V
    >>> batteries in the camera; they may damage the camera.

    >>
    >>
    >> There are different types of lithium battery.
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_battery.
    >> The problem with putting in a slightly higher voltage battery can be
    >> the extra current that can be 'pulled'
    >> Some products recommend not using batteries other than those stated.
    >> I have an old canon motor drive which is for Alkaline 1.5 AA only.
    >> There's a warning about not using NiCd, which are only 1.2v but I
    >> assume the drive circuitry
    >> uses the internal resistance of a alkaline AA to limit the current,
    >> where as a 1.2 niCd will
    >> a much lower resistance allowing more current to flow and blowing the
    >> drive motor.

    >
    > Wow, using the battery as a current limiter is a really bad idea. They
    > could have put in a current limiting resistor at a trivial cos.


    It's also a bad idea to assume that a poster who states he assumes
    something is actually correct in his assumptions, that's how internet
    nonsense gets started.
     
    Dave Cohen, Nov 19, 2010
    #13
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