Archiving medium size chunks of data (was double layer DVDs)

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by David Preece, Aug 5, 2004.

  1. David Preece

    David Preece Guest

    So, given that there are questions around the long term stability of
    DVD's, what's the feeling on what the best archiving technology is?

    I think the thing to remember is that I need to achieve basically two
    things: Being able to restore data (photos) if the hard drive craps
    itself; and a nice to have is being able to send stuff overseas.

    Actually, given these conditions some software that's good at spanning
    things across multiple disks (know any?) would be fine alongside
    ordinary burnable DVD's. If we create a new set once a year and post it
    off to the in-laws then any nasty accidents can always be fixed. Slow,
    sure, but then this would actually be the second line of defence (the
    machine is backed up onto FTP at the moment).

    Comments? Oh, this is a Windows question, the Mac is backed up
    differently because it has much less 'must never lose' data on it.

    Cheers,
    Dave
    David Preece, Aug 5, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. David Preece

    Gordon Guest

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 19:06:39 +1200, David Preece wrote:

    > So, given that there are questions around the long term stability of
    > DVD's, what's the feeling on what the best archiving technology is?


    To date, paper made from linen holds the lead.

    If you are worried about DVD's dying, (pun), then copy them to new ones
    every whatever time period.
    Gordon, Aug 5, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 19:06:39 +1200, David Preece <>
    wrote:

    >So, given that there are questions around the long term stability of
    >DVD's, what's the feeling on what the best archiving technology is?
    >
    >I think the thing to remember is that I need to achieve basically two
    >things: Being able to restore data (photos) if the hard drive craps
    >itself; and a nice to have is being able to send stuff overseas.
    >
    >Actually, given these conditions some software that's good at spanning
    >things across multiple disks (know any?) would be fine alongside
    >ordinary burnable DVD's. If we create a new set once a year and post it
    >off to the in-laws then any nasty accidents can always be fixed. Slow,
    >sure, but then this would actually be the second line of defence (the
    >machine is backed up onto FTP at the moment).
    >
    >Comments? Oh, this is a Windows question, the Mac is backed up
    >differently because it has much less 'must never lose' data on it.
    >
    >Cheers,
    >Dave




    A Photographer did some research into this and I posted the Info here from
    memory, it was to use Misumi Gold Archival CD's with some think like 300
    year life span..


    I might still have the links etc..


    I contacted the Misumi agents here and they did not even know the Italians had
    bought Mitsumi, but the CD were being made in the US, with links to the firm
    and a place were you can get the CD's from..

    The other thing that has good archival qualities is DVD RAM with its good
    error recovery format use.
    The GHOST of WOGER., Aug 5, 2004
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    says...
    > On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 19:06:39 +1200, David Preece <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >So, given that there are questions around the long term stability of
    > >DVD's, what's the feeling on what the best archiving technology is?
    > >
    > >I think the thing to remember is that I need to achieve basically two
    > >things: Being able to restore data (photos) if the hard drive craps
    > >itself; and a nice to have is being able to send stuff overseas.
    > >
    > >Actually, given these conditions some software that's good at spanning
    > >things across multiple disks (know any?) would be fine alongside
    > >ordinary burnable DVD's. If we create a new set once a year and post it
    > >off to the in-laws then any nasty accidents can always be fixed. Slow,
    > >sure, but then this would actually be the second line of defence (the
    > >machine is backed up onto FTP at the moment).
    > >
    > >Comments? Oh, this is a Windows question, the Mac is backed up
    > >differently because it has much less 'must never lose' data on it.
    > >
    > >Cheers,
    > >Dave

    >
    >
    >
    > A Photographer did some research into this and I posted the Info here from
    > memory, it was to use Misumi Gold Archival CD's with some think like 300
    > year life span..


    Taiyo Yuden, I would have thought.
    Patrick Dunford, Aug 5, 2004
    #4
  5. David Preece wrote:

    > So, given that there are questions around the long term stability of
    > DVD's, what's the feeling on what the best archiving technology is?
    >
    > I think the thing to remember is that I need to achieve basically two
    > things: Being able to restore data (photos) if the hard drive craps
    > itself; and a nice to have is being able to send stuff overseas.


    multimedia... heh, I've been meaning to use that word for so long.
    back up to a second Hdd, preferably in another computer, and also burn
    them to CD/DVD.

    One failing would be bad, but all three? not overly likely.

    Online storage? Buy some webspace that has decent backup systems in
    place, that way it is "not your problem" any more, but theirs... also
    keep backups yourself just in case though.

    Online storage isnt that bad, the initial traffic created is quite a
    bit, but once incremental backups are done, it's all good.

    --
    Dave Hall
    http://www.dave.net.nz
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Aug 5, 2004
    #5
  6. David Preece

    Warwick Guest

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 19:06:39 +1200, David Preece wrote:

    > So, given that there are questions around the long term stability of
    > DVD's, what's the feeling on what the best archiving technology is?
    >
    > I think the thing to remember is that I need to achieve basically two
    > things: Being able to restore data (photos) if the hard drive craps
    > itself; and a nice to have is being able to send stuff overseas.
    >
    > Actually, given these conditions some software that's good at spanning
    > things across multiple disks (know any?) would be fine alongside
    > ordinary burnable DVD's. If we create a new set once a year and post it
    > off to the in-laws then any nasty accidents can always be fixed. Slow,
    > sure, but then this would actually be the second line of defence (the
    > machine is backed up onto FTP at the moment).
    >
    > Comments? Oh, this is a Windows question, the Mac is backed up
    > differently because it has much less 'must never lose' data on it.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Dave


    One solution is called RAID - redundant arrays of inexpensive disks.

    Plenty of resources online for that.

    Your other option would be to burn two dvd's on each back up.
    That will greatly diminish your chances of losing data to a crappy
    writeable dvd.

    cheers
    Warwick, Aug 6, 2004
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Anthony

    Double layer or dual layer?

    Anthony, Jul 28, 2004, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    827
    Tarkus
    Jul 29, 2004
  2. Tony McKee

    Dual, Double Layer DVDs & DVD Recorders

    Tony McKee, Mar 24, 2005, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    23
    Views:
    2,907
    RichA
    Mar 31, 2005
  3. Replies:
    1
    Views:
    440
    P Pron
    Jan 27, 2006
  4. otivo
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    3,171
  5. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Double-layer DVDs

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Nov 24, 2008, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    531
    ~misfit~
    Nov 29, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page