Apple's foray into the "service/rental economy"

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Jun 3, 2014.

  1. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> It was PeterN who picked up that ball and turned it into "remote
    > >> access". As a Mac user I have always thought of "remote access" as a
    > >> way of remotely accessing my Mac (or any other Mac) to control it
    > >> and/or access files and software available on that computer from a
    > >> different computer. In that sense iCloud and none of the cloud storage
    > >> services provide "remote access" to control the parent computer.

    > >
    > >it's not just macs. remote access means remotely accessing a computer,
    > >whether it's mac, windows, linux or whatever else. it's definitely
    > >useful for a lot of things.
    > >
    > >putting stuff in the cloud is not remote access.

    >
    > I understand it's intended to provide remote access to files.


    you understand wrong.

    it's a central repository for documents (not files although it can be)
    which are kept in sync across multiple devices.
     
    nospam, Jun 4, 2014
    #21
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  2. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> I accept there are occasions when remote access to computers is used
    > >> for trouble-shooting but the vast majority of instances of remote
    > >> accessing are for the purpose of file access in one form or another.

    > >
    > >except this isn't about accessing your computer *at all*.
    > >
    > >the documents are in the cloud so that multiple devices can access
    > >them, whether it's a computer at home or one in your pocket while
    > >thousands of miles from home.
    > >
    > >the computer at home can be off for all that matters.

    >
    > So?


    it means that remote access is something else.
     
    nospam, Jun 4, 2014
    #22
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  3. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    > > It was PeterN who picked up that ball and turned it into "remote
    > > access". As a Mac user I have always thought of "remote access" as a way
    > > of remotely accessing my Mac (or any other Mac) to control it and/or
    > > access files and software available on that computer from a different
    > > computer. In that sense iCloud and none of the cloud storage services
    > > provide "remote access" to control the parent computer.

    >
    > In the context of setting up a server for file sharing from remote
    > locations, as an alternative to using the cloud for that purpose.


    someone might be able to set up the hardware to be a server, but that
    would be it.

    they won't get document syncing working (even major companies with lots
    of money don't get it right all the time) and apps would never know
    about it anyway.

    it would be nothing more than a remote disk drive which is very
    different than what the cloud offers.
     
    nospam, Jun 4, 2014
    #23
  4. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <2014060411453912410-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom>,
    Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    > >>> It was PeterN who picked up that ball and turned it into "remote
    > >>> access". As a Mac user I have always thought of "remote access" as a way
    > >>> of remotely accessing my Mac (or any other Mac) to control it and/or
    > >>> access files and software available on that computer from a different
    > >>> computer. In that sense iCloud and none of the cloud storage services
    > >>> provide "remote access" to control the parent computer.
    > >>
    > >> In the context of setting up a server for file sharing from remote
    > >> locations, as an alternative to using the cloud for that purpose.

    > >
    > > someone might be able to set up the hardware to be a server, but that
    > > would be it.
    > >
    > > they won't get document syncing working (even major companies with lots
    > > of money don't get it right all the time) and apps would never know
    > > about it anyway.
    > >
    > > it would be nothing more than a remote disk drive which is very
    > > different than what the cloud offers.

    >
    > When you start talking *Remote Desktop* this is what Mac users
    > understand, but most importantly this is not the same as iCloud or any
    > of the other cloud services such as Dropbox or Box.
    > < http://www.apple.com/remotedesktop/ >


    windows also calls it remote desktop or remote desktop connection:
    <http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/features/remote-de
    sktop-connection>
    Ever wished you could access your PC from the road? With Remote
    Desktop in Windows 7, you can.

    generically, it's called remote access and means accessing another
    computer remotely

    as you say, it's not the same as cloud storage for documents and
    syncing among devices.
     
    nospam, Jun 4, 2014
    #24
  5. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >>> it means that remote access is something else.
    > >>
    > >> Something else than what?

    > >
    > >Another aspect is that more and more apps are web based.
    > >
    > >This includes Google's various apps (word processor, spreadsheet,
    > >presentations, photo editor, drawing, gantt charts ... etc.). So having
    > >files sync'd + apps over the web, mean no need to "access" any remote
    > >computer. From any computer that accesses the web, you can access your
    > >"cloud" based docs and use "web based" apps to work on them with
    > >whatever device is handy that can operate the web based app. (eg:
    > >Compliant browser is enough).
    > >
    > >(This includes their Chrome OS where all apps are web based (ChromeBook)).
    > >
    > >Apple have their Pages, Numbers and Keynote apps on their cloud service
    > >and of course you can keep docs there as well (this has been available
    > >in the current form for a while). I'm not a fan of the Apple office
    > >Apps but ... with a new Mac coming in a week or so, I won't have to
    > >order the most recent bloatware (Office for Mac) from MS. I'll use
    > >pages/numbers/keynote on it (free on new Apple computers/ipads/iphones)
    > >and see how far I can stretch the glide.
    > >
    > >The above means you can have a fairly lightweight (in all senses
    > >computer) and as long as you have a decent internet speed you can do
    > >those things from wherever you are. No need to sync with another
    > >computer as long as the apps and the data are in the "cloud".
    > >
    > >One can drag a file from ones Dropbox folder (wherever you are) into the
    > >Apple cloud app as well (as long as the browser is Safari anyway.

    >
    > Interesting.
    >
    > It sounds as though Apple is trying to find a way around (at least
    > some of) Microsoft's grip on enterprise computing.


    everyone is. google already has.

    > But I don't know that that was what nospam was referring to, although
    > no doubt he will claim that that was what he always had in mind at the
    > time.


    it was, even if you're skeptical.
     
    nospam, Jun 5, 2014
    #25
  6. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> It was PeterN who picked up that ball and turned it into "remote
    > >> >> access". As a Mac user I have always thought of "remote access" as a
    > >> >> way of remotely accessing my Mac (or any other Mac) to control it
    > >> >> and/or access files and software available on that computer from a
    > >> >> different computer. In that sense iCloud and none of the cloud storage
    > >> >> services provide "remote access" to control the parent computer.
    > >> >
    > >> >it's not just macs. remote access means remotely accessing a computer,
    > >> >whether it's mac, windows, linux or whatever else. it's definitely
    > >> >useful for a lot of things.
    > >> >
    > >> >putting stuff in the cloud is not remote access.
    > >>
    > >> I understand it's intended to provide remote access to files.

    > >
    > >you understand wrong.
    > >
    > >it's a central repository for documents (not files although it can be)
    > >which are kept in sync across multiple devices.

    >
    > ... none of which devices are where the files (aka documents) are
    > stored and indeed none of which devices need be in the same place as
    > any other. It sounds remarkably like remote access to me.


    the term remote access means something specific which isn't cloud
    document storage despite that it is technically remotely accessed.
     
    nospam, Jun 5, 2014
    #26
  7. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> >That said I never actually used the words "remote access".
    > >>
    > >> I never claimed that you did. Nevertheless that is the conclusion to
    > >> be drawn from your statement " I can have all by work on a 3TB drive
    > >> at home, but it does nothing to give me access to a file, be it a PDF
    > >> draft, or a graphics file in progress at a remote location".
    > >> " ... access to a file ... at a remote location" certainly sounds like
    > >> 'remote access' to me..

    > >

    > Here starteth the quibbling:
    >
    > >it's not remote access. it's cloud storage.
    > >
    > >they are two very different things although may be offered by the same
    > >service.


    there's no quibbling at all. two different things with two different
    names. simple as that.

    > >> >>>>>> the cloud is mainly for a central repository for documents that are
    > >> >>>>>> kept in sync across multiple devices.
    > >> >>>>>>
    > >> >>>>>> remote access is rarely, if ever part of it.
    > >> >
    > >> >...and here *nospam* is correct.
    > >>
    > >> Only in the relatively restricted world of the Mac. But not in the
    > >> wider world. See my reply to nospam.

    > >
    > >it's not just mac.
    > >
    > >it's for *any* system, whether it's mac, windows, linux, ios, android,
    > >windows phone or something else.

    >
    > So cloud storage doesn't give remote access under any system?


    cloud storage doesn't. it's basically storage.

    a cloud service provider might, such icloud offering back to my mac
    which lets a mac user remotely access their mac at home. however,
    that's not the main feature of icloud.

    > I wonder then how users get hold of (aka access) these remotely stored
    > files?


    depending on the app, users may not even know where the actual
    documents are, nor do they need to know either.

    > Of course it's remote access!


    it may be remotely accessing documents but it is not 'remote access'
    the term.
     
    nospam, Jun 5, 2014
    #27
  8. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> > It was PeterN who picked up that ball and turned it into "remote
    > >> > access". As a Mac user I have always thought of "remote access" as a way
    > >> > of remotely accessing my Mac (or any other Mac) to control it and/or
    > >> > access files and software available on that computer from a different
    > >> > computer. In that sense iCloud and none of the cloud storage services
    > >> > provide "remote access" to control the parent computer.
    > >>
    > >> In the context of setting up a server for file sharing from remote
    > >> locations, as an alternative to using the cloud for that purpose.

    > >
    > >someone might be able to set up the hardware to be a server, but that
    > >would be it.
    > >
    > >they won't get document syncing working (even major companies with lots
    > >of money don't get it right all the time) and apps would never know
    > >about it anyway.
    > >
    > >it would be nothing more than a remote disk drive which is very
    > >different than what the cloud offers.

    >
    > Or in the recent case of Adobe, remote lack of access.
    >
    > http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/05/16/cloud_computing_is_fail_and_heres_why/
    > or http://tinyurl.com/l8yacqk
    >
    > Not that I have experienced the described problem or heard of anyone
    > else suffering either.


    overblown.

    and it can happen locally too, such as with a power outage, hard drive
    crash, etc.

    nothing is perfect.
     
    nospam, Jun 5, 2014
    #28
  9. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> When you start talking *Remote Desktop* this is what Mac users
    > >> understand, but most importantly this is not the same as iCloud or any
    > >> of the other cloud services such as Dropbox or Box.
    > >> < http://www.apple.com/remotedesktop/ >

    > >
    > >windows also calls it remote desktop or remote desktop connection:
    > ><http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/features/remote-de
    > >sktop-connection>
    > > Ever wished you could access your PC from the road? With Remote
    > > Desktop in Windows 7, you can.
    > >
    > >generically, it's called remote access and means accessing another
    > >computer remotely

    >
    > Why should people want to do that if they are not accessing the files
    > on the computer?


    it's up to each person what they want to do.

    > >as you say, it's not the same as cloud storage for documents and
    > >syncing among devices.

    >
    > It's not the same as cloud storage for documents, data and software
    > etc., because the cloud storage relies on an external computer for
    > functionality.


    you're just playing word games. again, 'remote access' has a specific
    meaning.

    any time you search on google, you're remotely accessing another
    computer. do you call that remote access too?

    any time you use email, you're remotely accessing another computer too.
    do you call that remote access? and not only that, but you're using
    cloud based storage for the mail.
     
    nospam, Jun 5, 2014
    #29
  10. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> I accept there are occasions when remote access to computers is used
    > >> >> for trouble-shooting but the vast majority of instances of remote
    > >> >> accessing are for the purpose of file access in one form or another.
    > >> >
    > >> >except this isn't about accessing your computer *at all*.
    > >> >
    > >> >the documents are in the cloud so that multiple devices can access
    > >> >them, whether it's a computer at home or one in your pocket while
    > >> >thousands of miles from home.
    > >> >
    > >> >the computer at home can be off for all that matters.
    > >>
    > >> So?

    > >
    > >it means that remote access is something else.

    >
    > Something else than what?


    something else than cloud storage.
     
    nospam, Jun 5, 2014
    #30
  11. RichA

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Wednesday, 4 June 2014 22:11:18 UTC+1, Eric Stevens wrote:
    > On Wed, 04 Jun 2014 14:21:52 -0400, nospam <>
    >
    > wrote:



    >
    > >> Only in the relatively restricted world of the Mac. But not in the

    >
    > >> wider world. See my reply to nospam.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >it's not just mac.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >it's for *any* system, whether it's mac, windows, linux, ios, android,

    >
    > >windows phone or something else.

    >
    >
    > So cloud storage doesn't give remote access under any system?


    The probem here is understanding what remote access actually means.
    It doesn;t have to be remote either I use remote access virtualy every day.
    I use sreen sharing from my imac to my macmini but it's only ~5ft away frommy finger tips because I can;t be bothered getting up going to my webcam computer, switch the screen on, attaching the keyboard, so I remotely log onfrom 5ft away
    THAT IS REMOTE ACCESS, which is not passive but you actively change whats going on on that computer. I can launch games, apps, utilties. I can open updocuments on the 'remote' macmini even if I don't have the neccessary appl.. on my local computer, this can not be done with a cloud service. (as far as I know)
    if I copy a document from a cloud service (the cloud service is passive) then although I'm remotety accessing a disc it IS NOT REMOTE ACCESS, that thetwo words 'REMOTE ACCESS' have come to mean.



    > I wonder then how users get hold of (aka access) these remotely stored
    >
    > files?
    >
    >
    >
    > Of course it's remote access!


    But not in the sense of the words remote access.

    Would you say that switching channels on a TV is remote access ?
    Some might see it as such but what of phone-in programs where you vote for someone is that also remote access.
     
    Whisky-dave, Jun 5, 2014
    #31
  12. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/4/2014 2:21 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>> It was PeterN who picked up that ball and turned it into "remote
    >>> access". As a Mac user I have always thought of "remote access" as a way
    >>> of remotely accessing my Mac (or any other Mac) to control it and/or
    >>> access files and software available on that computer from a different
    >>> computer. In that sense iCloud and none of the cloud storage services
    >>> provide "remote access" to control the parent computer.

    >>
    >> In the context of setting up a server for file sharing from remote
    >> locations, as an alternative to using the cloud for that purpose.

    >
    > someone might be able to set up the hardware to be a server, but that
    > would be it.
    >
    > they won't get document syncing working (even major companies with lots
    > of money don't get it right all the time) and apps would never know
    > about it anyway.
    >
    > it would be nothing more than a remote disk drive which is very
    > different than what the cloud offers.
    >


    So you are saying that before the cloud, there was no document synching?


    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jun 5, 2014
    #32
  13. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/4/2014 9:52 PM, Alan Browne wrote:
    > On 2014.06.04, 17:27 , Eric Stevens wrote:
    >> On Wed, 04 Jun 2014 14:21:55 -0400, nospam <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <>, Eric Stevens
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>> I accept there are occasions when remote access to computers is used
    >>>>>> for trouble-shooting but the vast majority of instances of remote
    >>>>>> accessing are for the purpose of file access in one form or another.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> except this isn't about accessing your computer *at all*.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> the documents are in the cloud so that multiple devices can access
    >>>>> them, whether it's a computer at home or one in your pocket while
    >>>>> thousands of miles from home.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> the computer at home can be off for all that matters.
    >>>>
    >>>> So?
    >>>
    >>> it means that remote access is something else.

    >>
    >> Something else than what?

    >
    > Another aspect is that more and more apps are web based.
    >
    > This includes Google's various apps (word processor, spreadsheet,
    > presentations, photo editor, drawing, gantt charts ... etc.). So having
    > files sync'd + apps over the web, mean no need to "access" any remote
    > computer. From any computer that accesses the web, you can access your
    > "cloud" based docs and use "web based" apps to work on them with
    > whatever device is handy that can operate the web based app. (eg:
    > Compliant browser is enough).
    >
    > (This includes their Chrome OS where all apps are web based (ChromeBook)).
    >
    > Apple have their Pages, Numbers and Keynote apps on their cloud service
    > and of course you can keep docs there as well (this has been available
    > in the current form for a while). I'm not a fan of the Apple office
    > Apps but ... with a new Mac coming in a week or so, I won't have to
    > order the most recent bloatware (Office for Mac) from MS. I'll use
    > pages/numbers/keynote on it (free on new Apple computers/ipads/iphones)
    > and see how far I can stretch the glide.
    >
    > The above means you can have a fairly lightweight (in all senses
    > computer) and as long as you have a decent internet speed you can do
    > those things from wherever you are. No need to sync with another
    > computer as long as the apps and the data are in the "cloud".
    >
    > One can drag a file from ones Dropbox folder (wherever you are) into the
    > Apple cloud app as well (as long as the browser is Safari anyway.
    >
    >


    Why does this remind me of the old dumb terminals. They were lightweight
    too.

    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jun 5, 2014
    #33
  14. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/4/2014 11:08 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, Eric Stevens
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>>>> it means that remote access is something else.
    >>>>
    >>>> Something else than what?
    >>>
    >>> Another aspect is that more and more apps are web based.
    >>>
    >>> This includes Google's various apps (word processor, spreadsheet,
    >>> presentations, photo editor, drawing, gantt charts ... etc.). So having
    >>> files sync'd + apps over the web, mean no need to "access" any remote
    >>> computer. From any computer that accesses the web, you can access your
    >>> "cloud" based docs and use "web based" apps to work on them with
    >>> whatever device is handy that can operate the web based app. (eg:
    >>> Compliant browser is enough).
    >>>
    >>> (This includes their Chrome OS where all apps are web based (ChromeBook)).
    >>>
    >>> Apple have their Pages, Numbers and Keynote apps on their cloud service
    >>> and of course you can keep docs there as well (this has been available
    >>> in the current form for a while). I'm not a fan of the Apple office
    >>> Apps but ... with a new Mac coming in a week or so, I won't have to
    >>> order the most recent bloatware (Office for Mac) from MS. I'll use
    >>> pages/numbers/keynote on it (free on new Apple computers/ipads/iphones)
    >>> and see how far I can stretch the glide.
    >>>
    >>> The above means you can have a fairly lightweight (in all senses
    >>> computer) and as long as you have a decent internet speed you can do
    >>> those things from wherever you are. No need to sync with another
    >>> computer as long as the apps and the data are in the "cloud".
    >>>
    >>> One can drag a file from ones Dropbox folder (wherever you are) into the
    >>> Apple cloud app as well (as long as the browser is Safari anyway.

    >>
    >> Interesting.
    >>
    >> It sounds as though Apple is trying to find a way around (at least
    >> some of) Microsoft's grip on enterprise computing.

    >
    > everyone is. google already has.
    >
    >> But I don't know that that was what nospam was referring to, although
    >> no doubt he will claim that that was what he always had in mind at the
    >> time.

    >
    > it was, even if you're skeptical.
    >


    Then why didn't you clerly say that: UP FRONT.


    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jun 5, 2014
    #34
  15. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/4/2014 11:08 PM, nospam wrote:



    > the term remote access means something specific which isn't cloud
    > document storage despite that it is technically remotely accessed.
    >


    Oh! The term is technically correct, even though it has a different
    meaning to some. And you are the one who regularly accuses others of
    playing with words.

    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jun 5, 2014
    #35
  16. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/4/2014 11:08 PM, nospam wrote:
    > In article <>, Eric Stevens
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>>> When you start talking *Remote Desktop* this is what Mac users
    >>>> understand, but most importantly this is not the same as iCloud or any
    >>>> of the other cloud services such as Dropbox or Box.
    >>>> < http://www.apple.com/remotedesktop/ >
    >>>
    >>> windows also calls it remote desktop or remote desktop connection:
    >>> <http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/features/remote-de
    >>> sktop-connection>
    >>> Ever wished you could access your PC from the road? With Remote
    >>> Desktop in Windows 7, you can.
    >>>
    >>> generically, it's called remote access and means accessing another
    >>> computer remotely

    >>
    >> Why should people want to do that if they are not accessing the files
    >> on the computer?

    >
    > it's up to each person what they want to do.
    >
    >>> as you say, it's not the same as cloud storage for documents and
    >>> syncing among devices.

    >>
    >> It's not the same as cloud storage for documents, data and software
    >> etc., because the cloud storage relies on an external computer for
    >> functionality.

    >
    > you're just playing word games. again, 'remote access' has a specific
    > meaning.
    >
    > any time you search on google, you're remotely accessing another
    > computer. do you call that remote access too?


    Yes.


    >
    > any time you use email, you're remotely accessing another computer too.
    > do you call that remote access? and not only that, but you're using
    > cloud based storage for the mail.
    >

    Word games.


    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jun 5, 2014
    #36
  17. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/5/2014 1:10 AM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2014-06-05 04:26:09 +0000, Eric Stevens <> said:
    >
    >> On Wed, 04 Jun 2014 23:08:32 -0400, nospam <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <>, Eric Stevens
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>>>> It was PeterN who picked up that ball and turned it into "remote
    >>>>>>>> access". As a Mac user I have always thought of "remote access"
    >>>>>>>> as a
    >>>>>>>> way of remotely accessing my Mac (or any other Mac) to control it
    >>>>>>>> and/or access files and software available on that computer from a
    >>>>>>>> different computer. In that sense iCloud and none of the cloud
    >>>>>>>> storage
    >>>>>>>> services provide "remote access" to control the parent computer.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> it's not just macs. remote access means remotely accessing a
    >>>>>>> computer,
    >>>>>>> whether it's mac, windows, linux or whatever else. it's definitely
    >>>>>>> useful for a lot of things.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> putting stuff in the cloud is not remote access.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I understand it's intended to provide remote access to files.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> you understand wrong.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> it's a central repository for documents (not files although it can be)
    >>>>> which are kept in sync across multiple devices.
    >>>>
    >>>> ... none of which devices are where the files (aka documents) are
    >>>> stored and indeed none of which devices need be in the same place as
    >>>> any other. It sounds remarkably like remote access to me.
    >>>
    >>> the term remote access means something specific which isn't cloud
    >>> document storage despite that it is technically remotely accessed.

    >>
    >> What are you going to call the process where the computer has to
    >> access files (not just documents) on external storage of some kind?

    >
    > There are several issues here.
    >
    > How is this external storage managed?
    > By the parent computer, or server, or a cloud service of some type?
    > Each are different. The first two are usually accessed by being
    > connected to specific network. Typically, an individual using a laptop
    > or tablet would sign in/log into, his/her home/corporate network usually
    > driven by a server and be permitted access to work files and internal
    > corporate data he/she is cleared for.
    >
    > Cloud storage uses a third party server which does not required
    > connection or communication with a home/office computer/server. So the
    > traveller can access any files stored in that third party cloud storage.
    >
    > ...and you as a Dropbox user know very well that documents are files,
    > just as image files are files.
    >
    > At no time in the process of accessing files stored in the cloud are
    > you, or anybody remotely accessing a computer desktop to control and
    > manipulate it.
    >
    > When I said access a file from a remote location, I meant exactly that.
    > I am at a location remote from where that particular file is stored in
    > the cloud, and I can access that file from that remote location. All
    > without gaining remote access to my home computer.
    >
    > More recently, I have been using my 20GB of cloud storage on Adobe's
    > Creative Cloud. I can load project files, be they NEF, DNG, PSD, TIFF,
    > or JPEG, and I can access them anywhere. That includes being able to
    > open Photoshop Touch on my iPad, make some prospective edits using PS
    > Touch while I am nowhere near my desktop Mac, and then save them to my
    > CC folder. When I get back to my desktop that file can be opened in PS
    > CC complete with any layers used in PS Touch.
    > At no time was I remotely controlling either my desktop or my iPad.
    >


    But you are using remote access to the files. Someone hee is creating a
    distinction without a difference.


    > Now if I want to use my iPad as an input device for my iMac. That is
    > another different thing which actually works quite well. Sort of a touch
    > tablet input, especially when used with a stylus.
    > < https://db.tt/BAfMOWEh >
    >



    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Jun 5, 2014
    #37
  18. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> >putting stuff in the cloud is not remote access.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> I understand it's intended to provide remote access to files.
    > >> >
    > >> >you understand wrong.
    > >> >
    > >> >it's a central repository for documents (not files although it can be)
    > >> >which are kept in sync across multiple devices.
    > >>
    > >> ... none of which devices are where the files (aka documents) are
    > >> stored and indeed none of which devices need be in the same place as
    > >> any other. It sounds remarkably like remote access to me.

    > >
    > >the term remote access means something specific which isn't cloud
    > >document storage despite that it is technically remotely accessed.

    >
    > What are you going to call the process where the computer has to
    > access files (not just documents) on external storage of some kind?


    accessing files.

    what do you call the process when you mount a shared hard drive on your
    desktop and access a file? is that remote access too?

    you might not even know a shared hard drive was accessed by the
    computer. then what?
     
    nospam, Jun 5, 2014
    #38
  19. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> So cloud storage doesn't give remote access under any system?

    > >
    > >cloud storage doesn't. it's basically storage.

    >
    > But it's not locally accessed.


    that's why it's called cloud.

    > >a cloud service provider might, such icloud offering back to my mac
    > >which lets a mac user remotely access their mac at home. however,
    > >that's not the main feature of icloud.
    > >
    > >> I wonder then how users get hold of (aka access) these remotely stored
    > >> files?

    > >
    > >depending on the app, users may not even know where the actual
    > >documents are, nor do they need to know either.

    >
    > It's not important whether users know or not where the files are. I
    > still wonder how users get hold of (aka access) these remotely stored
    > files.


    they choose a document from list, or in some cases, the computer
    figures out which documents to access for the user.

    where the contents of that document actually reside makes very little
    difference except to software developers who write the apps and need to
    know the internal details.

    what matters to users is can you view and edit photos, text documents,
    spreadsheets, etc.

    > >> Of course it's remote access!

    > >
    > >it may be remotely accessing documents but it is not 'remote access'
    > >the term.

    >
    > Only because that's you choose to define it. You will have to expand
    > your thinking.


    i didn't choose the definition and it's *you* who needs to expand your
    thinking.
     
    nospam, Jun 5, 2014
    #39
  20. RichA

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, Eric Stevens
    <> wrote:

    > >> >> When you start talking *Remote Desktop* this is what Mac users
    > >> >> understand, but most importantly this is not the same as iCloud or any
    > >> >> of the other cloud services such as Dropbox or Box.
    > >> >> < http://www.apple.com/remotedesktop/ >
    > >> >
    > >> >windows also calls it remote desktop or remote desktop connection:
    > >> ><http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/products/features/remote-de
    > >> >sktop-connection>
    > >> > Ever wished you could access your PC from the road? With Remote
    > >> > Desktop in Windows 7, you can.
    > >> >
    > >> >generically, it's called remote access and means accessing another
    > >> >computer remotely
    > >>
    > >> Why should people want to do that if they are not accessing the files
    > >> on the computer?

    > >
    > >it's up to each person what they want to do.

    >
    > You are evading the question. I daare you to answer it.


    i'm not evading anything.

    if someone needs to remotely access a computer, they'll do that. it's
    entirely up to the user what they need to do and how to do it.

    however, that's something *other* than cloud storage.

    > >> >as you say, it's not the same as cloud storage for documents and
    > >> >syncing among devices.
    > >>
    > >> It's not the same as cloud storage for documents, data and software
    > >> etc., because the cloud storage relies on an external computer for
    > >> functionality.

    > >
    > >you're just playing word games. again, 'remote access' has a specific
    > >meaning.

    >
    > But not a narow one.


    a specific one. remote access means controlling another computer. end
    of story.

    you're trying to redefine it into something it isn't.

    > >any time you search on google, you're remotely accessing another
    > >computer. do you call that remote access too?

    >
    > YYes. And I'm remotely accessing Google's files too.


    technically yes, but that's not what people think of what happens when
    they search via google.

    > >any time you use email, you're remotely accessing another computer too.
    > >do you call that remote access?

    >
    > By definition, accessing another computer is rremote access.


    like i said, word games.

    the phrase remote access has a specific meaning. you're trying to
    redefine it.

    > > ...and not only that, but you're using cloud based storage for the mail.

    >
    > So 'Cloud based storage' is just a new name for something that's been
    > around since 1993 or even 1971?


    pretty much, although syncing across multiple devices wasn't a priority
    back then. it was mostly one device at a time.
     
    nospam, Jun 5, 2014
    #40
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