Apple now acting as police, INS agents??!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Sep 3, 2011.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    homes? How compliant.

    San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.

    They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone that
    an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.

    Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators to a
    home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the statement said.
    The two Apple employees searched the home while the officers waited
    outside, police said. They did not find the item there and declined to
    file a police report, according to the statement.

    An Apple spokesman declined to comment.

    A city police official declined to comment to CNN and referred
    reporters to the news release. Earlier this week, officials said they
    had no record of an investigation.

    In the statement sent to CNN and other news media late Friday, police
    did not describe what "lost item" Apple was looking for. However, the
    file name of that news release is "iphone5.doc," as Reuters pointed
    out.

    Lt. Troy Dangerfield gave an interview to SF Weekly Friday afternoon
    confirming the police's involvement with Apple in the investigation.

    SF Weekly also interviewed a man who told the publication that he
    consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers last
    month. No one in the group identified himself as being an Apple
    employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that he assumed
    they were all police officials and would not have permitted entry if
    he knew the searchers were from Apple.

    Apple's team searched the home, car and computer files, while police
    waited outside, the reports say. The investigators reportedly told the
    man that they had traced the phone's GPS signal to his house. When
    asked, he said he had been at the same bar where the phone was
    reportedly lost but that he didn't have it, the report says.

    One of the investigators, who identified himself as Tony, gave the man
    living in the house a phone number and told him to call with any
    information about the lost phone, the report says. When the SF Weekly
    reporter called, a man named Anthony Colon, who said he was an Apple
    employee, answered, the report says.

    Colon's LinkedIn profile, which he eventually removed, said he is a
    senior investigator for Apple and a former San Jose police sergeant.

    The man, who reportedly said he's a U.S. citizen who lives with
    relatives, told SF Weekly that the people searching his home
    questioned his family's immigration status.

    The man could not be reached by CNN for comment.

    The situation is reminiscent of when an Apple engineer's prototype
    iPhone 4 was taken from a bar in Redwood City, also in the Bay Area,
    and sold to the blog Gizmodo, which published the first pictures of
    the device.

    Last year, Apple worked with the Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer
    Team task force to search the homes of the man who allegedly sold the
    device and of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen.

    REACT leader Michael Sterner said none of his officers were present at
    the home that was searched last month. He declined to comment further,
    citing a policy that prevents him from discussing investigations that
    are open or being handled by another department.

    Apple has a history of working with REACT but apparently did not seek
    its services this time. The task force has struggled recently over
    budget constraints, prompting the organization to shut down an office
    and employ fewer officers, Sterner said.

    Nor did Apple enlist the Federal Bureau of Investigation. An FBI
    spokesman said the cyber-program leader was not aware of such an
    investigation.

    Last time, an Apple employee lost his phone at a German beer garden.
    This time, it happened on Saturday, July 23 at tequila bar Cava 22,
    said Jose Valle, the bar's manager and the owner's son. A man called
    two days in a row after that, asking anxiously whether Valle had found
    an iPhone, he said.

    At Apple's expense, Cava 22 seemed to benefit from the news coverage.
    The bar drew an unusually large crowd Wednesday night after the news
    broke, Valle said.

    CNET had been working with the police for two weeks, and officials
    failed to uncover any reports of a search, police spokesman Albie
    Esparza told CNN. Apple had not returned the official's phone call on
    Thursday, he said. In a message to Apple, the official told the
    company that he would refer reporters to its spokespeople if he did
    not receive a call.

    Police spokespeople say they weren't briefed on the investigation,
    which involved Apple and the police, until Friday. The mixup may be
    attributed to Apple's unwillingness to file a formal report or with a
    lack of communication between the various police departments involved.

    Police do not typically lie to reporters, even when discussing ongoing
    investigations, said Rebecca Lonergan, a former federal prosecutor who
    is now a professor at the University of Southern California's law
    school. However, in some cases, they are allowed to mislead suspects,
    she said.
     
    RichA, Sep 3, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/3/2011 9:43 AM, RichA wrote:
    > So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    > homes? How compliant.
    >
    > San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    > investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >
    > They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone that
    > an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    > neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    > claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.
    >
    > Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators to a
    > home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the statement said.
    > The two Apple employees searched the home while the officers waited
    > outside, police said. They did not find the item there and declined to
    > file a police report, according to the statement.
    >
    > An Apple spokesman declined to comment.
    >
    > A city police official declined to comment to CNN and referred
    > reporters to the news release. Earlier this week, officials said they
    > had no record of an investigation.
    >
    > In the statement sent to CNN and other news media late Friday, police
    > did not describe what "lost item" Apple was looking for. However, the
    > file name of that news release is "iphone5.doc," as Reuters pointed
    > out.
    >
    > Lt. Troy Dangerfield gave an interview to SF Weekly Friday afternoon
    > confirming the police's involvement with Apple in the investigation.
    >
    > SF Weekly also interviewed a man who told the publication that he
    > consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers last
    > month. No one in the group identified himself as being an Apple
    > employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that he assumed
    > they were all police officials and would not have permitted entry if
    > he knew the searchers were from Apple.
    >
    > Apple's team searched the home, car and computer files, while police
    > waited outside, the reports say. The investigators reportedly told the
    > man that they had traced the phone's GPS signal to his house. When
    > asked, he said he had been at the same bar where the phone was
    > reportedly lost but that he didn't have it, the report says.
    >
    > One of the investigators, who identified himself as Tony, gave the man
    > living in the house a phone number and told him to call with any
    > information about the lost phone, the report says. When the SF Weekly
    > reporter called, a man named Anthony Colon, who said he was an Apple
    > employee, answered, the report says.
    >
    > Colon's LinkedIn profile, which he eventually removed, said he is a
    > senior investigator for Apple and a former San Jose police sergeant.
    >
    > The man, who reportedly said he's a U.S. citizen who lives with
    > relatives, told SF Weekly that the people searching his home
    > questioned his family's immigration status.
    >
    > The man could not be reached by CNN for comment.
    >
    > The situation is reminiscent of when an Apple engineer's prototype
    > iPhone 4 was taken from a bar in Redwood City, also in the Bay Area,
    > and sold to the blog Gizmodo, which published the first pictures of
    > the device.
    >
    > Last year, Apple worked with the Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer
    > Team task force to search the homes of the man who allegedly sold the
    > device and of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen.
    >
    > REACT leader Michael Sterner said none of his officers were present at
    > the home that was searched last month. He declined to comment further,
    > citing a policy that prevents him from discussing investigations that
    > are open or being handled by another department.
    >
    > Apple has a history of working with REACT but apparently did not seek
    > its services this time. The task force has struggled recently over
    > budget constraints, prompting the organization to shut down an office
    > and employ fewer officers, Sterner said.
    >
    > Nor did Apple enlist the Federal Bureau of Investigation. An FBI
    > spokesman said the cyber-program leader was not aware of such an
    > investigation.
    >
    > Last time, an Apple employee lost his phone at a German beer garden.
    > This time, it happened on Saturday, July 23 at tequila bar Cava 22,
    > said Jose Valle, the bar's manager and the owner's son. A man called
    > two days in a row after that, asking anxiously whether Valle had found
    > an iPhone, he said.
    >
    > At Apple's expense, Cava 22 seemed to benefit from the news coverage.
    > The bar drew an unusually large crowd Wednesday night after the news
    > broke, Valle said.
    >
    > CNET had been working with the police for two weeks, and officials
    > failed to uncover any reports of a search, police spokesman Albie
    > Esparza told CNN. Apple had not returned the official's phone call on
    > Thursday, he said. In a message to Apple, the official told the
    > company that he would refer reporters to its spokespeople if he did
    > not receive a call.
    >
    > Police spokespeople say they weren't briefed on the investigation,
    > which involved Apple and the police, until Friday. The mixup may be
    > attributed to Apple's unwillingness to file a formal report or with a
    > lack of communication between the various police departments involved.
    >
    > Police do not typically lie to reporters, even when discussing ongoing
    > investigations, said Rebecca Lonergan, a former federal prosecutor who
    > is now a professor at the University of Southern California's law
    > school. However, in some cases, they are allowed to mislead suspects,
    > she said.



    Was that an original story investigated by you, or did you plagiarize again?

    There is something in this writing that sounds like a cut of whole cloth:
    Especially, but not limited to: "police don't lie"



    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 3, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/3/2011 11:57 AM, Irwell wrote:
    > On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:08:39 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >
    >> On 9/3/2011 9:43 AM, RichA wrote:
    >>> So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    >>> homes? How compliant.
    >>>
    >>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>
    >>> They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone that
    >>> an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    >>> neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    >>> claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.
    >>>
    >>> Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators to a
    >>> home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the statement said.
    >>> The two Apple employees searched the home while the officers waited
    >>> outside, police said. They did not find the item there and declined to
    >>> file a police report, according to the statement.
    >>>
    >>> An Apple spokesman declined to comment.
    >>>
    >>> A city police official declined to comment to CNN and referred
    >>> reporters to the news release. Earlier this week, officials said they
    >>> had no record of an investigation.
    >>>
    >>> In the statement sent to CNN and other news media late Friday, police
    >>> did not describe what "lost item" Apple was looking for. However, the
    >>> file name of that news release is "iphone5.doc," as Reuters pointed
    >>> out.
    >>>
    >>> Lt. Troy Dangerfield gave an interview to SF Weekly Friday afternoon
    >>> confirming the police's involvement with Apple in the investigation.
    >>>
    >>> SF Weekly also interviewed a man who told the publication that he
    >>> consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers last
    >>> month. No one in the group identified himself as being an Apple
    >>> employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that he assumed
    >>> they were all police officials and would not have permitted entry if
    >>> he knew the searchers were from Apple.
    >>>
    >>> Apple's team searched the home, car and computer files, while police
    >>> waited outside, the reports say. The investigators reportedly told the
    >>> man that they had traced the phone's GPS signal to his house. When
    >>> asked, he said he had been at the same bar where the phone was
    >>> reportedly lost but that he didn't have it, the report says.
    >>>
    >>> One of the investigators, who identified himself as Tony, gave the man
    >>> living in the house a phone number and told him to call with any
    >>> information about the lost phone, the report says. When the SF Weekly
    >>> reporter called, a man named Anthony Colon, who said he was an Apple
    >>> employee, answered, the report says.
    >>>
    >>> Colon's LinkedIn profile, which he eventually removed, said he is a
    >>> senior investigator for Apple and a former San Jose police sergeant.
    >>>
    >>> The man, who reportedly said he's a U.S. citizen who lives with
    >>> relatives, told SF Weekly that the people searching his home
    >>> questioned his family's immigration status.
    >>>
    >>> The man could not be reached by CNN for comment.
    >>>
    >>> The situation is reminiscent of when an Apple engineer's prototype
    >>> iPhone 4 was taken from a bar in Redwood City, also in the Bay Area,
    >>> and sold to the blog Gizmodo, which published the first pictures of
    >>> the device.
    >>>
    >>> Last year, Apple worked with the Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer
    >>> Team task force to search the homes of the man who allegedly sold the
    >>> device and of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen.
    >>>
    >>> REACT leader Michael Sterner said none of his officers were present at
    >>> the home that was searched last month. He declined to comment further,
    >>> citing a policy that prevents him from discussing investigations that
    >>> are open or being handled by another department.
    >>>
    >>> Apple has a history of working with REACT but apparently did not seek
    >>> its services this time. The task force has struggled recently over
    >>> budget constraints, prompting the organization to shut down an office
    >>> and employ fewer officers, Sterner said.
    >>>
    >>> Nor did Apple enlist the Federal Bureau of Investigation. An FBI
    >>> spokesman said the cyber-program leader was not aware of such an
    >>> investigation.
    >>>
    >>> Last time, an Apple employee lost his phone at a German beer garden.
    >>> This time, it happened on Saturday, July 23 at tequila bar Cava 22,
    >>> said Jose Valle, the bar's manager and the owner's son. A man called
    >>> two days in a row after that, asking anxiously whether Valle had found
    >>> an iPhone, he said.
    >>>
    >>> At Apple's expense, Cava 22 seemed to benefit from the news coverage.
    >>> The bar drew an unusually large crowd Wednesday night after the news
    >>> broke, Valle said.
    >>>
    >>> CNET had been working with the police for two weeks, and officials
    >>> failed to uncover any reports of a search, police spokesman Albie
    >>> Esparza told CNN. Apple had not returned the official's phone call on
    >>> Thursday, he said. In a message to Apple, the official told the
    >>> company that he would refer reporters to its spokespeople if he did
    >>> not receive a call.
    >>>
    >>> Police spokespeople say they weren't briefed on the investigation,
    >>> which involved Apple and the police, until Friday. The mixup may be
    >>> attributed to Apple's unwillingness to file a formal report or with a
    >>> lack of communication between the various police departments involved.
    >>>
    >>> Police do not typically lie to reporters, even when discussing ongoing
    >>> investigations, said Rebecca Lonergan, a former federal prosecutor who
    >>> is now a professor at the University of Southern California's law
    >>> school. However, in some cases, they are allowed to mislead suspects,
    >>> she said.

    >>
    >>
    >> Was that an original story investigated by you, or did you plagiarize again?

    >
    > Look before you leap,old proverb.
    >
    > San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    > investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.


    Where is his attribution.

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 3, 2011
    #3
  4. RichA

    Irwell Guest

    On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:08:39 -0400, PeterN wrote:

    > On 9/3/2011 9:43 AM, RichA wrote:
    >> So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    >> homes? How compliant.
    >>
    >> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>
    >> They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone that
    >> an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    >> neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    >> claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.
    >>
    >> Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators to a
    >> home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the statement said.
    >> The two Apple employees searched the home while the officers waited
    >> outside, police said. They did not find the item there and declined to
    >> file a police report, according to the statement.
    >>
    >> An Apple spokesman declined to comment.
    >>
    >> A city police official declined to comment to CNN and referred
    >> reporters to the news release. Earlier this week, officials said they
    >> had no record of an investigation.
    >>
    >> In the statement sent to CNN and other news media late Friday, police
    >> did not describe what "lost item" Apple was looking for. However, the
    >> file name of that news release is "iphone5.doc," as Reuters pointed
    >> out.
    >>
    >> Lt. Troy Dangerfield gave an interview to SF Weekly Friday afternoon
    >> confirming the police's involvement with Apple in the investigation.
    >>
    >> SF Weekly also interviewed a man who told the publication that he
    >> consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers last
    >> month. No one in the group identified himself as being an Apple
    >> employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that he assumed
    >> they were all police officials and would not have permitted entry if
    >> he knew the searchers were from Apple.
    >>
    >> Apple's team searched the home, car and computer files, while police
    >> waited outside, the reports say. The investigators reportedly told the
    >> man that they had traced the phone's GPS signal to his house. When
    >> asked, he said he had been at the same bar where the phone was
    >> reportedly lost but that he didn't have it, the report says.
    >>
    >> One of the investigators, who identified himself as Tony, gave the man
    >> living in the house a phone number and told him to call with any
    >> information about the lost phone, the report says. When the SF Weekly
    >> reporter called, a man named Anthony Colon, who said he was an Apple
    >> employee, answered, the report says.
    >>
    >> Colon's LinkedIn profile, which he eventually removed, said he is a
    >> senior investigator for Apple and a former San Jose police sergeant.
    >>
    >> The man, who reportedly said he's a U.S. citizen who lives with
    >> relatives, told SF Weekly that the people searching his home
    >> questioned his family's immigration status.
    >>
    >> The man could not be reached by CNN for comment.
    >>
    >> The situation is reminiscent of when an Apple engineer's prototype
    >> iPhone 4 was taken from a bar in Redwood City, also in the Bay Area,
    >> and sold to the blog Gizmodo, which published the first pictures of
    >> the device.
    >>
    >> Last year, Apple worked with the Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer
    >> Team task force to search the homes of the man who allegedly sold the
    >> device and of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen.
    >>
    >> REACT leader Michael Sterner said none of his officers were present at
    >> the home that was searched last month. He declined to comment further,
    >> citing a policy that prevents him from discussing investigations that
    >> are open or being handled by another department.
    >>
    >> Apple has a history of working with REACT but apparently did not seek
    >> its services this time. The task force has struggled recently over
    >> budget constraints, prompting the organization to shut down an office
    >> and employ fewer officers, Sterner said.
    >>
    >> Nor did Apple enlist the Federal Bureau of Investigation. An FBI
    >> spokesman said the cyber-program leader was not aware of such an
    >> investigation.
    >>
    >> Last time, an Apple employee lost his phone at a German beer garden.
    >> This time, it happened on Saturday, July 23 at tequila bar Cava 22,
    >> said Jose Valle, the bar's manager and the owner's son. A man called
    >> two days in a row after that, asking anxiously whether Valle had found
    >> an iPhone, he said.
    >>
    >> At Apple's expense, Cava 22 seemed to benefit from the news coverage.
    >> The bar drew an unusually large crowd Wednesday night after the news
    >> broke, Valle said.
    >>
    >> CNET had been working with the police for two weeks, and officials
    >> failed to uncover any reports of a search, police spokesman Albie
    >> Esparza told CNN. Apple had not returned the official's phone call on
    >> Thursday, he said. In a message to Apple, the official told the
    >> company that he would refer reporters to its spokespeople if he did
    >> not receive a call.
    >>
    >> Police spokespeople say they weren't briefed on the investigation,
    >> which involved Apple and the police, until Friday. The mixup may be
    >> attributed to Apple's unwillingness to file a formal report or with a
    >> lack of communication between the various police departments involved.
    >>
    >> Police do not typically lie to reporters, even when discussing ongoing
    >> investigations, said Rebecca Lonergan, a former federal prosecutor who
    >> is now a professor at the University of Southern California's law
    >> school. However, in some cases, they are allowed to mislead suspects,
    >> she said.

    >
    >
    > Was that an original story investigated by you, or did you plagiarize again?


    Look before you leap,old proverb.

    San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
     
    Irwell, Sep 3, 2011
    #4
  5. RichA

    John A. Guest

    On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:57:38 -0400, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >On 9/3/2011 11:57 AM, Irwell wrote:
    >> On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:08:39 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 9/3/2011 9:43 AM, RichA wrote:
    >>>> So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    >>>> homes? How compliant.
    >>>>
    >>>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>>
    >>>> They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone that
    >>>> an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    >>>> neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    >>>> claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.
    >>>>
    >>>> Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators to a
    >>>> home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the statement said.
    >>>> The two Apple employees searched the home while the officers waited
    >>>> outside, police said. They did not find the item there and declined to
    >>>> file a police report, according to the statement.
    >>>>
    >>>> An Apple spokesman declined to comment.
    >>>>
    >>>> A city police official declined to comment to CNN and referred
    >>>> reporters to the news release. Earlier this week, officials said they
    >>>> had no record of an investigation.
    >>>>
    >>>> In the statement sent to CNN and other news media late Friday, police
    >>>> did not describe what "lost item" Apple was looking for. However, the
    >>>> file name of that news release is "iphone5.doc," as Reuters pointed
    >>>> out.
    >>>>
    >>>> Lt. Troy Dangerfield gave an interview to SF Weekly Friday afternoon
    >>>> confirming the police's involvement with Apple in the investigation.
    >>>>
    >>>> SF Weekly also interviewed a man who told the publication that he
    >>>> consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers last
    >>>> month. No one in the group identified himself as being an Apple
    >>>> employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that he assumed
    >>>> they were all police officials and would not have permitted entry if
    >>>> he knew the searchers were from Apple.
    >>>>
    >>>> Apple's team searched the home, car and computer files, while police
    >>>> waited outside, the reports say. The investigators reportedly told the
    >>>> man that they had traced the phone's GPS signal to his house. When
    >>>> asked, he said he had been at the same bar where the phone was
    >>>> reportedly lost but that he didn't have it, the report says.
    >>>>
    >>>> One of the investigators, who identified himself as Tony, gave the man
    >>>> living in the house a phone number and told him to call with any
    >>>> information about the lost phone, the report says. When the SF Weekly
    >>>> reporter called, a man named Anthony Colon, who said he was an Apple
    >>>> employee, answered, the report says.
    >>>>
    >>>> Colon's LinkedIn profile, which he eventually removed, said he is a
    >>>> senior investigator for Apple and a former San Jose police sergeant.
    >>>>
    >>>> The man, who reportedly said he's a U.S. citizen who lives with
    >>>> relatives, told SF Weekly that the people searching his home
    >>>> questioned his family's immigration status.
    >>>>
    >>>> The man could not be reached by CNN for comment.
    >>>>
    >>>> The situation is reminiscent of when an Apple engineer's prototype
    >>>> iPhone 4 was taken from a bar in Redwood City, also in the Bay Area,
    >>>> and sold to the blog Gizmodo, which published the first pictures of
    >>>> the device.
    >>>>
    >>>> Last year, Apple worked with the Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer
    >>>> Team task force to search the homes of the man who allegedly sold the
    >>>> device and of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen.
    >>>>
    >>>> REACT leader Michael Sterner said none of his officers were present at
    >>>> the home that was searched last month. He declined to comment further,
    >>>> citing a policy that prevents him from discussing investigations that
    >>>> are open or being handled by another department.
    >>>>
    >>>> Apple has a history of working with REACT but apparently did not seek
    >>>> its services this time. The task force has struggled recently over
    >>>> budget constraints, prompting the organization to shut down an office
    >>>> and employ fewer officers, Sterner said.
    >>>>
    >>>> Nor did Apple enlist the Federal Bureau of Investigation. An FBI
    >>>> spokesman said the cyber-program leader was not aware of such an
    >>>> investigation.
    >>>>
    >>>> Last time, an Apple employee lost his phone at a German beer garden.
    >>>> This time, it happened on Saturday, July 23 at tequila bar Cava 22,
    >>>> said Jose Valle, the bar's manager and the owner's son. A man called
    >>>> two days in a row after that, asking anxiously whether Valle had found
    >>>> an iPhone, he said.
    >>>>
    >>>> At Apple's expense, Cava 22 seemed to benefit from the news coverage.
    >>>> The bar drew an unusually large crowd Wednesday night after the news
    >>>> broke, Valle said.
    >>>>
    >>>> CNET had been working with the police for two weeks, and officials
    >>>> failed to uncover any reports of a search, police spokesman Albie
    >>>> Esparza told CNN. Apple had not returned the official's phone call on
    >>>> Thursday, he said. In a message to Apple, the official told the
    >>>> company that he would refer reporters to its spokespeople if he did
    >>>> not receive a call.
    >>>>
    >>>> Police spokespeople say they weren't briefed on the investigation,
    >>>> which involved Apple and the police, until Friday. The mixup may be
    >>>> attributed to Apple's unwillingness to file a formal report or with a
    >>>> lack of communication between the various police departments involved.
    >>>>
    >>>> Police do not typically lie to reporters, even when discussing ongoing
    >>>> investigations, said Rebecca Lonergan, a former federal prosecutor who
    >>>> is now a professor at the University of Southern California's law
    >>>> school. However, in some cases, they are allowed to mislead suspects,
    >>>> she said.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Was that an original story investigated by you, or did you plagiarize again?

    >>
    >> Look before you leap,old proverb.
    >>
    >> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.

    >
    >Where is his attribution.


    Between the parentheses.
     
    John A., Sep 3, 2011
    #5
  6. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/3/2011 12:49 PM, John A. wrote:
    > On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:57:38 -0400, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 9/3/2011 11:57 AM, Irwell wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:08:39 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 9/3/2011 9:43 AM, RichA wrote:
    >>>>> So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    >>>>> homes? How compliant.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>>>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone that
    >>>>> an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    >>>>> neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    >>>>> claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators to a
    >>>>> home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the statement said.
    >>>>> The two Apple employees searched the home while the officers waited
    >>>>> outside, police said. They did not find the item there and declined to
    >>>>> file a police report, according to the statement.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> An Apple spokesman declined to comment.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> A city police official declined to comment to CNN and referred
    >>>>> reporters to the news release. Earlier this week, officials said they
    >>>>> had no record of an investigation.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> In the statement sent to CNN and other news media late Friday, police
    >>>>> did not describe what "lost item" Apple was looking for. However, the
    >>>>> file name of that news release is "iphone5.doc," as Reuters pointed
    >>>>> out.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Lt. Troy Dangerfield gave an interview to SF Weekly Friday afternoon
    >>>>> confirming the police's involvement with Apple in the investigation.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> SF Weekly also interviewed a man who told the publication that he
    >>>>> consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers last
    >>>>> month. No one in the group identified himself as being an Apple
    >>>>> employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that he assumed
    >>>>> they were all police officials and would not have permitted entry if
    >>>>> he knew the searchers were from Apple.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Apple's team searched the home, car and computer files, while police
    >>>>> waited outside, the reports say. The investigators reportedly told the
    >>>>> man that they had traced the phone's GPS signal to his house. When
    >>>>> asked, he said he had been at the same bar where the phone was
    >>>>> reportedly lost but that he didn't have it, the report says.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> One of the investigators, who identified himself as Tony, gave the man
    >>>>> living in the house a phone number and told him to call with any
    >>>>> information about the lost phone, the report says. When the SF Weekly
    >>>>> reporter called, a man named Anthony Colon, who said he was an Apple
    >>>>> employee, answered, the report says.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Colon's LinkedIn profile, which he eventually removed, said he is a
    >>>>> senior investigator for Apple and a former San Jose police sergeant.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The man, who reportedly said he's a U.S. citizen who lives with
    >>>>> relatives, told SF Weekly that the people searching his home
    >>>>> questioned his family's immigration status.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The man could not be reached by CNN for comment.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The situation is reminiscent of when an Apple engineer's prototype
    >>>>> iPhone 4 was taken from a bar in Redwood City, also in the Bay Area,
    >>>>> and sold to the blog Gizmodo, which published the first pictures of
    >>>>> the device.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Last year, Apple worked with the Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer
    >>>>> Team task force to search the homes of the man who allegedly sold the
    >>>>> device and of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> REACT leader Michael Sterner said none of his officers were present at
    >>>>> the home that was searched last month. He declined to comment further,
    >>>>> citing a policy that prevents him from discussing investigations that
    >>>>> are open or being handled by another department.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Apple has a history of working with REACT but apparently did not seek
    >>>>> its services this time. The task force has struggled recently over
    >>>>> budget constraints, prompting the organization to shut down an office
    >>>>> and employ fewer officers, Sterner said.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Nor did Apple enlist the Federal Bureau of Investigation. An FBI
    >>>>> spokesman said the cyber-program leader was not aware of such an
    >>>>> investigation.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Last time, an Apple employee lost his phone at a German beer garden.
    >>>>> This time, it happened on Saturday, July 23 at tequila bar Cava 22,
    >>>>> said Jose Valle, the bar's manager and the owner's son. A man called
    >>>>> two days in a row after that, asking anxiously whether Valle had found
    >>>>> an iPhone, he said.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> At Apple's expense, Cava 22 seemed to benefit from the news coverage.
    >>>>> The bar drew an unusually large crowd Wednesday night after the news
    >>>>> broke, Valle said.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> CNET had been working with the police for two weeks, and officials
    >>>>> failed to uncover any reports of a search, police spokesman Albie
    >>>>> Esparza told CNN. Apple had not returned the official's phone call on
    >>>>> Thursday, he said. In a message to Apple, the official told the
    >>>>> company that he would refer reporters to its spokespeople if he did
    >>>>> not receive a call.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Police spokespeople say they weren't briefed on the investigation,
    >>>>> which involved Apple and the police, until Friday. The mixup may be
    >>>>> attributed to Apple's unwillingness to file a formal report or with a
    >>>>> lack of communication between the various police departments involved.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Police do not typically lie to reporters, even when discussing ongoing
    >>>>> investigations, said Rebecca Lonergan, a former federal prosecutor who
    >>>>> is now a professor at the University of Southern California's law
    >>>>> school. However, in some cases, they are allowed to mislead suspects,
    >>>>> she said.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Was that an original story investigated by you, or did you plagiarize again?
    >>>
    >>> Look before you leap,old proverb.
    >>>
    >>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.

    >>
    >> Where is his attribution.

    >
    > Between the parentheses.


    Oh! That makes it clear and easy to check the context.

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 3, 2011
    #6
  7. RichA

    John A. Guest

    On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 14:28:04 -0400, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >On 9/3/2011 12:49 PM, John A. wrote:
    >> On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:57:38 -0400, PeterN
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 9/3/2011 11:57 AM, Irwell wrote:
    >>>> On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:08:39 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On 9/3/2011 9:43 AM, RichA wrote:
    >>>>>> So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    >>>>>> homes? How compliant.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>>>>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone that
    >>>>>> an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    >>>>>> neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    >>>>>> claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators to a
    >>>>>> home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the statement said.
    >>>>>> The two Apple employees searched the home while the officers waited
    >>>>>> outside, police said. They did not find the item there and declined to
    >>>>>> file a police report, according to the statement.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> An Apple spokesman declined to comment.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> A city police official declined to comment to CNN and referred
    >>>>>> reporters to the news release. Earlier this week, officials said they
    >>>>>> had no record of an investigation.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> In the statement sent to CNN and other news media late Friday, police
    >>>>>> did not describe what "lost item" Apple was looking for. However, the
    >>>>>> file name of that news release is "iphone5.doc," as Reuters pointed
    >>>>>> out.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Lt. Troy Dangerfield gave an interview to SF Weekly Friday afternoon
    >>>>>> confirming the police's involvement with Apple in the investigation.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> SF Weekly also interviewed a man who told the publication that he
    >>>>>> consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers last
    >>>>>> month. No one in the group identified himself as being an Apple
    >>>>>> employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that he assumed
    >>>>>> they were all police officials and would not have permitted entry if
    >>>>>> he knew the searchers were from Apple.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Apple's team searched the home, car and computer files, while police
    >>>>>> waited outside, the reports say. The investigators reportedly told the
    >>>>>> man that they had traced the phone's GPS signal to his house. When
    >>>>>> asked, he said he had been at the same bar where the phone was
    >>>>>> reportedly lost but that he didn't have it, the report says.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> One of the investigators, who identified himself as Tony, gave the man
    >>>>>> living in the house a phone number and told him to call with any
    >>>>>> information about the lost phone, the report says. When the SF Weekly
    >>>>>> reporter called, a man named Anthony Colon, who said he was an Apple
    >>>>>> employee, answered, the report says.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Colon's LinkedIn profile, which he eventually removed, said he is a
    >>>>>> senior investigator for Apple and a former San Jose police sergeant.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The man, who reportedly said he's a U.S. citizen who lives with
    >>>>>> relatives, told SF Weekly that the people searching his home
    >>>>>> questioned his family's immigration status.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The man could not be reached by CNN for comment.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The situation is reminiscent of when an Apple engineer's prototype
    >>>>>> iPhone 4 was taken from a bar in Redwood City, also in the Bay Area,
    >>>>>> and sold to the blog Gizmodo, which published the first pictures of
    >>>>>> the device.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Last year, Apple worked with the Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer
    >>>>>> Team task force to search the homes of the man who allegedly sold the
    >>>>>> device and of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> REACT leader Michael Sterner said none of his officers were present at
    >>>>>> the home that was searched last month. He declined to comment further,
    >>>>>> citing a policy that prevents him from discussing investigations that
    >>>>>> are open or being handled by another department.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Apple has a history of working with REACT but apparently did not seek
    >>>>>> its services this time. The task force has struggled recently over
    >>>>>> budget constraints, prompting the organization to shut down an office
    >>>>>> and employ fewer officers, Sterner said.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Nor did Apple enlist the Federal Bureau of Investigation. An FBI
    >>>>>> spokesman said the cyber-program leader was not aware of such an
    >>>>>> investigation.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Last time, an Apple employee lost his phone at a German beer garden.
    >>>>>> This time, it happened on Saturday, July 23 at tequila bar Cava 22,
    >>>>>> said Jose Valle, the bar's manager and the owner's son. A man called
    >>>>>> two days in a row after that, asking anxiously whether Valle had found
    >>>>>> an iPhone, he said.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> At Apple's expense, Cava 22 seemed to benefit from the news coverage.
    >>>>>> The bar drew an unusually large crowd Wednesday night after the news
    >>>>>> broke, Valle said.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> CNET had been working with the police for two weeks, and officials
    >>>>>> failed to uncover any reports of a search, police spokesman Albie
    >>>>>> Esparza told CNN. Apple had not returned the official's phone call on
    >>>>>> Thursday, he said. In a message to Apple, the official told the
    >>>>>> company that he would refer reporters to its spokespeople if he did
    >>>>>> not receive a call.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Police spokespeople say they weren't briefed on the investigation,
    >>>>>> which involved Apple and the police, until Friday. The mixup may be
    >>>>>> attributed to Apple's unwillingness to file a formal report or with a
    >>>>>> lack of communication between the various police departments involved.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Police do not typically lie to reporters, even when discussing ongoing
    >>>>>> investigations, said Rebecca Lonergan, a former federal prosecutor who
    >>>>>> is now a professor at the University of Southern California's law
    >>>>>> school. However, in some cases, they are allowed to mislead suspects,
    >>>>>> she said.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Was that an original story investigated by you, or did you plagiarize again?
    >>>>
    >>>> Look before you leap,old proverb.
    >>>>
    >>>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>
    >>> Where is his attribution.

    >>
    >> Between the parentheses.

    >
    >Oh! That makes it clear and easy to check the context.


    Yup. Or at least clear enough if one actually cares to find it.
     
    John A., Sep 3, 2011
    #7
  8. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/4/2011 12:37 AM, Rich wrote:
    > PeterN<> wrote in
    > news:4e6271ba$0$5521$-secrets.com:
    >
    >> On 9/3/2011 12:49 PM, John A. wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:57:38 -0400, PeterN
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 9/3/2011 11:57 AM, Irwell wrote:
    >>>>> On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:08:39 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On 9/3/2011 9:43 AM, RichA wrote:
    >>>>>>> So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    >>>>>>> homes? How compliant.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>>>>>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone
    >>>>>>> that an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    >>>>>>> neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    >>>>>>> claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators
    >>>>>>> to a home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the
    >>>>>>> statement said. The two Apple employees searched the home while
    >>>>>>> the officers waited outside, police said. They did not find the
    >>>>>>> item there and declined to file a police report, according to the
    >>>>>>> statement.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> An Apple spokesman declined to comment.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> A city police official declined to comment to CNN and referred
    >>>>>>> reporters to the news release. Earlier this week, officials said
    >>>>>>> they had no record of an investigation.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> In the statement sent to CNN and other news media late Friday,
    >>>>>>> police did not describe what "lost item" Apple was looking for.
    >>>>>>> However, the file name of that news release is "iphone5.doc," as
    >>>>>>> Reuters pointed out.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Lt. Troy Dangerfield gave an interview to SF Weekly Friday
    >>>>>>> afternoon confirming the police's involvement with Apple in the
    >>>>>>> investigation.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> SF Weekly also interviewed a man who told the publication that he
    >>>>>>> consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers
    >>>>>>> last month. No one in the group identified himself as being an
    >>>>>>> Apple employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that
    >>>>>>> he assumed they were all police officials and would not have
    >>>>>>> permitted entry if he knew the searchers were from Apple.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Apple's team searched the home, car and computer files, while
    >>>>>>> police waited outside, the reports say. The investigators
    >>>>>>> reportedly told the man that they had traced the phone's GPS
    >>>>>>> signal to his house. When asked, he said he had been at the same
    >>>>>>> bar where the phone was reportedly lost but that he didn't have
    >>>>>>> it, the report says.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> One of the investigators, who identified himself as Tony, gave
    >>>>>>> the man living in the house a phone number and told him to call
    >>>>>>> with any information about the lost phone, the report says. When
    >>>>>>> the SF Weekly reporter called, a man named Anthony Colon, who
    >>>>>>> said he was an Apple employee, answered, the report says.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Colon's LinkedIn profile, which he eventually removed, said he is
    >>>>>>> a senior investigator for Apple and a former San Jose police
    >>>>>>> sergeant.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The man, who reportedly said he's a U.S. citizen who lives with
    >>>>>>> relatives, told SF Weekly that the people searching his home
    >>>>>>> questioned his family's immigration status.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The man could not be reached by CNN for comment.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> The situation is reminiscent of when an Apple engineer's
    >>>>>>> prototype iPhone 4 was taken from a bar in Redwood City, also in
    >>>>>>> the Bay Area, and sold to the blog Gizmodo, which published the
    >>>>>>> first pictures of the device.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Last year, Apple worked with the Rapid Enforcement Allied
    >>>>>>> Computer Team task force to search the homes of the man who
    >>>>>>> allegedly sold the device and of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> REACT leader Michael Sterner said none of his officers were
    >>>>>>> present at the home that was searched last month. He declined to
    >>>>>>> comment further, citing a policy that prevents him from
    >>>>>>> discussing investigations that are open or being handled by
    >>>>>>> another department.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Apple has a history of working with REACT but apparently did not
    >>>>>>> seek its services this time. The task force has struggled
    >>>>>>> recently over budget constraints, prompting the organization to
    >>>>>>> shut down an office and employ fewer officers, Sterner said.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Nor did Apple enlist the Federal Bureau of Investigation. An FBI
    >>>>>>> spokesman said the cyber-program leader was not aware of such an
    >>>>>>> investigation.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Last time, an Apple employee lost his phone at a German beer
    >>>>>>> garden. This time, it happened on Saturday, July 23 at tequila
    >>>>>>> bar Cava 22, said Jose Valle, the bar's manager and the owner's
    >>>>>>> son. A man called two days in a row after that, asking anxiously
    >>>>>>> whether Valle had found an iPhone, he said.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> At Apple's expense, Cava 22 seemed to benefit from the news
    >>>>>>> coverage. The bar drew an unusually large crowd Wednesday night
    >>>>>>> after the news broke, Valle said.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> CNET had been working with the police for two weeks, and
    >>>>>>> officials failed to uncover any reports of a search, police
    >>>>>>> spokesman Albie Esparza told CNN. Apple had not returned the
    >>>>>>> official's phone call on Thursday, he said. In a message to
    >>>>>>> Apple, the official told the company that he would refer
    >>>>>>> reporters to its spokespeople if he did not receive a call.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Police spokespeople say they weren't briefed on the
    >>>>>>> investigation, which involved Apple and the police, until Friday.
    >>>>>>> The mixup may be attributed to Apple's unwillingness to file a
    >>>>>>> formal report or with a lack of communication between the various
    >>>>>>> police departments involved.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Police do not typically lie to reporters, even when discussing
    >>>>>>> ongoing investigations, said Rebecca Lonergan, a former federal
    >>>>>>> prosecutor who is now a professor at the University of Southern
    >>>>>>> California's law school. However, in some cases, they are allowed
    >>>>>>> to mislead suspects, she said.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Was that an original story investigated by you, or did you
    >>>>>> plagiarize again?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Look before you leap,old proverb.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>>>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>>
    >>>> Where is his attribution.
    >>>
    >>> Between the parentheses.

    >>
    >> Oh! That makes it clear and easy to check the context.
    >>

    >
    > Enough with the tangenting, nitwit. Do you agree with Apple searching
    > people's homes now?


    Give me a link to the whole story and I can comment. It really isn't
    difficult to provide a link.
    I don't even want you searching my home.

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 4, 2011
    #8
  9. RichA

    Ray Fischer Guest

    RichA <> wrote:
    >So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    >homes? How compliant.


    How dishonest of you. They did nothing of the sort.

    >San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >
    >They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone that
    >an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    >neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    >claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.
    >
    >Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators to a
    >home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the statement said.


    Four? Or two? Or none? I've seen all of those claims in news
    reports.

    --
    Ray Fischer | Mendocracy (n.) government by lying
    | The new GOP ideal
     
    Ray Fischer, Sep 4, 2011
    #9
  10. RichA

    Irwell Guest

    On Sun, 04 Sep 2011 12:42:49 -0400, PeterN wrote:

    > On 9/4/2011 12:37 AM, Rich wrote:
    >> PeterN<> wrote in
    >> news:4e6271ba$0$5521$-secrets.com:
    >>
    >>> On 9/3/2011 12:49 PM, John A. wrote:
    >>>> On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:57:38 -0400, PeterN
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On 9/3/2011 11:57 AM, Irwell wrote:
    >>>>>> On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:08:39 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> On 9/3/2011 9:43 AM, RichA wrote:
    >>>>>>>> So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    >>>>>>>> homes? How compliant.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>>>>>>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone
    >>>>>>>> that an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    >>>>>>>> neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    >>>>>>>> claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators
    >>>>>>>> to a home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the
    >>>>>>>> statement said. The two Apple employees searched the home while
    >>>>>>>> the officers waited outside, police said. They did not find the
    >>>>>>>> item there and declined to file a police report, according to the
    >>>>>>>> statement.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> An Apple spokesman declined to comment.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> A city police official declined to comment to CNN and referred
    >>>>>>>> reporters to the news release. Earlier this week, officials said
    >>>>>>>> they had no record of an investigation.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> In the statement sent to CNN and other news media late Friday,
    >>>>>>>> police did not describe what "lost item" Apple was looking for.
    >>>>>>>> However, the file name of that news release is "iphone5.doc," as
    >>>>>>>> Reuters pointed out.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Lt. Troy Dangerfield gave an interview to SF Weekly Friday
    >>>>>>>> afternoon confirming the police's involvement with Apple in the
    >>>>>>>> investigation.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> SF Weekly also interviewed a man who told the publication that he
    >>>>>>>> consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers
    >>>>>>>> last month. No one in the group identified himself as being an
    >>>>>>>> Apple employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that
    >>>>>>>> he assumed they were all police officials and would not have
    >>>>>>>> permitted entry if he knew the searchers were from Apple.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Apple's team searched the home, car and computer files, while
    >>>>>>>> police waited outside, the reports say. The investigators
    >>>>>>>> reportedly told the man that they had traced the phone's GPS
    >>>>>>>> signal to his house. When asked, he said he had been at the same
    >>>>>>>> bar where the phone was reportedly lost but that he didn't have
    >>>>>>>> it, the report says.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> One of the investigators, who identified himself as Tony, gave
    >>>>>>>> the man living in the house a phone number and told him to call
    >>>>>>>> with any information about the lost phone, the report says. When
    >>>>>>>> the SF Weekly reporter called, a man named Anthony Colon, who
    >>>>>>>> said he was an Apple employee, answered, the report says.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Colon's LinkedIn profile, which he eventually removed, said he is
    >>>>>>>> a senior investigator for Apple and a former San Jose police
    >>>>>>>> sergeant.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The man, who reportedly said he's a U.S. citizen who lives with
    >>>>>>>> relatives, told SF Weekly that the people searching his home
    >>>>>>>> questioned his family's immigration status.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The man could not be reached by CNN for comment.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The situation is reminiscent of when an Apple engineer's
    >>>>>>>> prototype iPhone 4 was taken from a bar in Redwood City, also in
    >>>>>>>> the Bay Area, and sold to the blog Gizmodo, which published the
    >>>>>>>> first pictures of the device.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Last year, Apple worked with the Rapid Enforcement Allied
    >>>>>>>> Computer Team task force to search the homes of the man who
    >>>>>>>> allegedly sold the device and of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> REACT leader Michael Sterner said none of his officers were
    >>>>>>>> present at the home that was searched last month. He declined to
    >>>>>>>> comment further, citing a policy that prevents him from
    >>>>>>>> discussing investigations that are open or being handled by
    >>>>>>>> another department.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Apple has a history of working with REACT but apparently did not
    >>>>>>>> seek its services this time. The task force has struggled
    >>>>>>>> recently over budget constraints, prompting the organization to
    >>>>>>>> shut down an office and employ fewer officers, Sterner said.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Nor did Apple enlist the Federal Bureau of Investigation. An FBI
    >>>>>>>> spokesman said the cyber-program leader was not aware of such an
    >>>>>>>> investigation.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Last time, an Apple employee lost his phone at a German beer
    >>>>>>>> garden. This time, it happened on Saturday, July 23 at tequila
    >>>>>>>> bar Cava 22, said Jose Valle, the bar's manager and the owner's
    >>>>>>>> son. A man called two days in a row after that, asking anxiously
    >>>>>>>> whether Valle had found an iPhone, he said.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> At Apple's expense, Cava 22 seemed to benefit from the news
    >>>>>>>> coverage. The bar drew an unusually large crowd Wednesday night
    >>>>>>>> after the news broke, Valle said.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> CNET had been working with the police for two weeks, and
    >>>>>>>> officials failed to uncover any reports of a search, police
    >>>>>>>> spokesman Albie Esparza told CNN. Apple had not returned the
    >>>>>>>> official's phone call on Thursday, he said. In a message to
    >>>>>>>> Apple, the official told the company that he would refer
    >>>>>>>> reporters to its spokespeople if he did not receive a call.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Police spokespeople say they weren't briefed on the
    >>>>>>>> investigation, which involved Apple and the police, until Friday.
    >>>>>>>> The mixup may be attributed to Apple's unwillingness to file a
    >>>>>>>> formal report or with a lack of communication between the various
    >>>>>>>> police departments involved.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Police do not typically lie to reporters, even when discussing
    >>>>>>>> ongoing investigations, said Rebecca Lonergan, a former federal
    >>>>>>>> prosecutor who is now a professor at the University of Southern
    >>>>>>>> California's law school. However, in some cases, they are allowed
    >>>>>>>> to mislead suspects, she said.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Was that an original story investigated by you, or did you
    >>>>>>> plagiarize again?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Look before you leap,old proverb.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>>>>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Where is his attribution.
    >>>>
    >>>> Between the parentheses.
    >>>
    >>> Oh! That makes it clear and easy to check the context.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Enough with the tangenting, nitwit. Do you agree with Apple searching
    >> people's homes now?

    >
    > Give me a link to the whole story and I can comment. It really isn't
    > difficult to provide a link.


    Or in looking it up? You can manage to use the link I suppose.
    Police assisted Apple in search of man's home updated 1 day ago
    Police officials said they helped Apple investigators, who searched a
    man's home here recently.
    http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/mobile/09/02/iphone.5.prototype/index.html
     
    Irwell, Sep 5, 2011
    #10
  11. RichA

    John A. Guest

    On Sun, 04 Sep 2011 12:42:49 -0400, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >On 9/4/2011 12:37 AM, Rich wrote:
    >> PeterN<> wrote in
    >> news:4e6271ba$0$5521$-secrets.com:
    >>
    >>> On 9/3/2011 12:49 PM, John A. wrote:
    >>>> On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:57:38 -0400, PeterN
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On 9/3/2011 11:57 AM, Irwell wrote:
    >>>>>> On Sat, 03 Sep 2011 11:08:39 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> On 9/3/2011 9:43 AM, RichA wrote:
    >>>>>>>> So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    >>>>>>>> homes? How compliant.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>>>>>>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> They were reportedly looking for a prototype of the next iPhone
    >>>>>>>> that an Apple employee left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission
    >>>>>>>> neighborhood, according to CNET. Apple had contacted the police
    >>>>>>>> claiming the prototype is invaluable, the report says.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Four San Francisco Police officers escorted Apple investigators
    >>>>>>>> to a home in the city's Bernal Heights neighborhood, the
    >>>>>>>> statement said. The two Apple employees searched the home while
    >>>>>>>> the officers waited outside, police said. They did not find the
    >>>>>>>> item there and declined to file a police report, according to the
    >>>>>>>> statement.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> An Apple spokesman declined to comment.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> A city police official declined to comment to CNN and referred
    >>>>>>>> reporters to the news release. Earlier this week, officials said
    >>>>>>>> they had no record of an investigation.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> In the statement sent to CNN and other news media late Friday,
    >>>>>>>> police did not describe what "lost item" Apple was looking for.
    >>>>>>>> However, the file name of that news release is "iphone5.doc," as
    >>>>>>>> Reuters pointed out.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Lt. Troy Dangerfield gave an interview to SF Weekly Friday
    >>>>>>>> afternoon confirming the police's involvement with Apple in the
    >>>>>>>> investigation.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> SF Weekly also interviewed a man who told the publication that he
    >>>>>>>> consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers
    >>>>>>>> last month. No one in the group identified himself as being an
    >>>>>>>> Apple employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that
    >>>>>>>> he assumed they were all police officials and would not have
    >>>>>>>> permitted entry if he knew the searchers were from Apple.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Apple's team searched the home, car and computer files, while
    >>>>>>>> police waited outside, the reports say. The investigators
    >>>>>>>> reportedly told the man that they had traced the phone's GPS
    >>>>>>>> signal to his house. When asked, he said he had been at the same
    >>>>>>>> bar where the phone was reportedly lost but that he didn't have
    >>>>>>>> it, the report says.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> One of the investigators, who identified himself as Tony, gave
    >>>>>>>> the man living in the house a phone number and told him to call
    >>>>>>>> with any information about the lost phone, the report says. When
    >>>>>>>> the SF Weekly reporter called, a man named Anthony Colon, who
    >>>>>>>> said he was an Apple employee, answered, the report says.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Colon's LinkedIn profile, which he eventually removed, said he is
    >>>>>>>> a senior investigator for Apple and a former San Jose police
    >>>>>>>> sergeant.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The man, who reportedly said he's a U.S. citizen who lives with
    >>>>>>>> relatives, told SF Weekly that the people searching his home
    >>>>>>>> questioned his family's immigration status.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The man could not be reached by CNN for comment.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> The situation is reminiscent of when an Apple engineer's
    >>>>>>>> prototype iPhone 4 was taken from a bar in Redwood City, also in
    >>>>>>>> the Bay Area, and sold to the blog Gizmodo, which published the
    >>>>>>>> first pictures of the device.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Last year, Apple worked with the Rapid Enforcement Allied
    >>>>>>>> Computer Team task force to search the homes of the man who
    >>>>>>>> allegedly sold the device and of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> REACT leader Michael Sterner said none of his officers were
    >>>>>>>> present at the home that was searched last month. He declined to
    >>>>>>>> comment further, citing a policy that prevents him from
    >>>>>>>> discussing investigations that are open or being handled by
    >>>>>>>> another department.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Apple has a history of working with REACT but apparently did not
    >>>>>>>> seek its services this time. The task force has struggled
    >>>>>>>> recently over budget constraints, prompting the organization to
    >>>>>>>> shut down an office and employ fewer officers, Sterner said.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Nor did Apple enlist the Federal Bureau of Investigation. An FBI
    >>>>>>>> spokesman said the cyber-program leader was not aware of such an
    >>>>>>>> investigation.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Last time, an Apple employee lost his phone at a German beer
    >>>>>>>> garden. This time, it happened on Saturday, July 23 at tequila
    >>>>>>>> bar Cava 22, said Jose Valle, the bar's manager and the owner's
    >>>>>>>> son. A man called two days in a row after that, asking anxiously
    >>>>>>>> whether Valle had found an iPhone, he said.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> At Apple's expense, Cava 22 seemed to benefit from the news
    >>>>>>>> coverage. The bar drew an unusually large crowd Wednesday night
    >>>>>>>> after the news broke, Valle said.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> CNET had been working with the police for two weeks, and
    >>>>>>>> officials failed to uncover any reports of a search, police
    >>>>>>>> spokesman Albie Esparza told CNN. Apple had not returned the
    >>>>>>>> official's phone call on Thursday, he said. In a message to
    >>>>>>>> Apple, the official told the company that he would refer
    >>>>>>>> reporters to its spokespeople if he did not receive a call.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Police spokespeople say they weren't briefed on the
    >>>>>>>> investigation, which involved Apple and the police, until Friday.
    >>>>>>>> The mixup may be attributed to Apple's unwillingness to file a
    >>>>>>>> formal report or with a lack of communication between the various
    >>>>>>>> police departments involved.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Police do not typically lie to reporters, even when discussing
    >>>>>>>> ongoing investigations, said Rebecca Lonergan, a former federal
    >>>>>>>> prosecutor who is now a professor at the University of Southern
    >>>>>>>> California's law school. However, in some cases, they are allowed
    >>>>>>>> to mislead suspects, she said.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Was that an original story investigated by you, or did you
    >>>>>>> plagiarize again?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Look before you leap,old proverb.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> San Francisco (CNN) -- Police officials said they helped Apple
    >>>>>> investigators, who searched a man's home here recently.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Where is his attribution.
    >>>>
    >>>> Between the parentheses.
    >>>
    >>> Oh! That makes it clear and easy to check the context.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Enough with the tangenting, nitwit. Do you agree with Apple searching
    >> people's homes now?

    >
    >Give me a link to the whole story and I can comment. It really isn't
    >difficult to provide a link.
    >I don't even want you searching my home.


    You know, it really is mind-bogglingly easy to google the first line
    of the post and find multiple links to news sites running the story.
    Easier, even, than composing a one-line post to complain about the
    lack of a provided link.

    Welcome to the internet. If you have misplaced your manual, please
    visit http://help.verizon.net/
     
    John A., Sep 5, 2011
    #11
  12. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/4/2011 7:05 PM, Irwell wrote:
    > On Sun, 04 Sep 2011 12:42:49 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >


    <snip>

    >> Give me a link to the whole story and I can comment. It really isn't
    >> difficult to provide a link.

    >
    > Or in looking it up? You can manage to use the link I suppose.
    > Police assisted Apple in search of man's home updated 1 day ago
    > Police officials said they helped Apple investigators, who searched a
    > man's home here recently.
    > http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/mobile/09/02/iphone.5.prototype/index.html


    Thank you. But, you don't think Rich has distorted facts, here?

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 5, 2011
    #12
  13. RichA

    Irwell Guest

    On Mon, 05 Sep 2011 10:11:56 -0400, PeterN wrote:

    > On 9/4/2011 7:05 PM, Irwell wrote:
    >> On Sun, 04 Sep 2011 12:42:49 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >>

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>> Give me a link to the whole story and I can comment. It really isn't
    >>> difficult to provide a link.

    >>
    >> Or in looking it up? You can manage to use the link I suppose.
    >> Police assisted Apple in search of man's home updated 1 day ago
    >> Police officials said they helped Apple investigators, who searched a
    >> man's home here recently.
    >> http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/mobile/09/02/iphone.5.prototype/index.html

    >
    > Thank you. But, you don't think Rich has distorted facts, here?


    In a mild way, his only comment was:

    "So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    homes? How compliant."
     
    Irwell, Sep 5, 2011
    #13
  14. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/5/2011 11:33 AM, Irwell wrote:
    > On Mon, 05 Sep 2011 10:11:56 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >
    >> On 9/4/2011 7:05 PM, Irwell wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 04 Sep 2011 12:42:49 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >>>

    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>>> Give me a link to the whole story and I can comment. It really isn't
    >>>> difficult to provide a link.
    >>>
    >>> Or in looking it up? You can manage to use the link I suppose.
    >>> Police assisted Apple in search of man's home updated 1 day ago
    >>> Police officials said they helped Apple investigators, who searched a
    >>> man's home here recently.
    >>> http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/mobile/09/02/iphone.5.prototype/index.html

    >>
    >> Thank you. But, you don't think Rich has distorted facts, here?

    >
    > In a mild way, his only comment was:
    >
    > "So the police are now letting "Apple personnel" search people's
    > homes? How compliant."


    My point was that when one uses an article as authority, that article
    should be clearly identified as the information source. Rich's posting
    did not clearly separate his comment from information contained n the
    article.
    Tell ya what? I will pay one dollar for every post of his that is
    accurate and unbiased in all respects, and you post a nickel. I will
    come out way ahead. I can think of few times when Rich gave an answer
    that was not evasive.

    As the Duck pointed out, Rich was inadvertently correct. However, I wish
    that was the most immoral act ever omitted by a business entity.
    Possibly one of the most callous was the Lockheed Electra, that was
    placed into service and allowed to continue, without modification, even
    though there were known flaws.

    <http://www.airdisaster.com/reports/ntsb/AAR86-01.pdf>

    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_L-188_Electra>



    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 5, 2011
    #14
  15. RichA

    Irwell Guest

    On Mon, 05 Sep 2011 16:13:22 -0400, PeterN wrote:

    >
    > As the Duck pointed out, Rich was inadvertently correct. However, I wish
    > that was the most immoral act ever omitted by a business entity.



    Did you really mean omitted?
     
    Irwell, Sep 5, 2011
    #15
  16. RichA

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >On 2011-09-05 07:11:56 -0700, PeterN <> said:


    >It appears that back in July several members/investigators of the Apple
    >security team sought assistance from the SFPD to stand by at a San
    >Francisco address which was the last tracked location of the missing
    >prototype iPhone 5.
    >
    >With the four SFPD officers standing by the Apple employees, who at no
    >time identified themselves as Apple employees, searched the home and
    >did not find the missing iPhone.
    >So it appears that the four SFPD officers aided & abetted in a
    >warrantless search and violation of the Fourth Amendment.


    Well, no. They asked for and got permission to do the search.
    But by pretending to be police officers they committed the crime of
    impersonating an officer.

    >I guess the idea was to actually keep things quiet so that they would
    >not have a repeat of last year's PR fiasco to deal with, but no such
    >luck. This is going to be worse.


    Really, what kind of moron takes a phone protoype from Apple and loses
    it in a bar?!? It's either a subtle publicity stunt gone very bad or
    some really strange corporate culture at Apple.

    --
    Ray Fischer | Mendocracy (n.) government by lying
    | The new GOP ideal
     
    Ray Fischer, Sep 5, 2011
    #16
  17. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/5/2011 11:21 AM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2011-09-05 07:11:56 -0700, PeterN <> said:
    >
    >> On 9/4/2011 7:05 PM, Irwell wrote:
    >>> On Sun, 04 Sep 2011 12:42:49 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >>>

    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>>> Give me a link to the whole story and I can comment. It really isn't
    >>>> difficult to provide a link.
    >>>
    >>> Or in looking it up? You can manage to use the link I suppose.
    >>> Police assisted Apple in search of man's home updated 1 day ago
    >>> Police officials said they helped Apple investigators, who searched a
    >>> man's home here recently.
    >>> http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/mobile/09/02/iphone.5.prototype/index.html

    >>
    >> Thank you. But, you don't think Rich has distorted facts, here?

    >
    > I think Rich has leaped on the very distorted & disturbing facts of the
    > story as reported to justify his position regarding Apple.
    > The reports have changed along the way in what seems to be a coverup on
    > the part of Apple and the SFPD, before confirmation of the original
    > story made that pointless.
    > This seems to be the chronology of the reveal as it happened
    >
    > < http://blogs.sfweekly.com/thesnitch/2011/09/iphone_5_apple_police.php >
    >
    > The NBC "is a hoax" story.
    > <
    > http://www.nbcbayarea.com/blogs/pre...-iPhone-Apparently-a-Fish-Tale-129052798.html
    >
    >>

    >
    > ...and the "no it's not"
    > < http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2392409,00.asp >
    > <
    > http://blog.chron.com/techblog/2011...techblogfulltext (TechBlog - Full Text)&tsp=1
    >
    >>

    > or
    > < http://tinyurl.com/3f6bf8p >
    >
    > It appears that back in July several members/investigators of the Apple
    > security team sought assistance from the SFPD to stand by at a San
    > Francisco address which was the last tracked location of the missing
    > prototype iPhone 5.
    >
    > With the four SFPD officers standing by the Apple employees, who at no
    > time identified themselves as Apple employees, searched the home and did
    > not find the missing iPhone.
    > So it appears that the four SFPD officers aided & abetted in a
    > warrantless search and violation of the Fourth Amendment.
    > I guess the idea was to actually keep things quiet so that they would
    > not have a repeat of last year's PR fiasco to deal with, but no such
    > luck. This is going to be worse.
    >

    Yup!


    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 5, 2011
    #17
  18. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/5/2011 4:32 PM, Irwell wrote:
    > On Mon, 05 Sep 2011 16:13:22 -0400, PeterN wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> As the Duck pointed out, Rich was inadvertently correct. However, I wish
    >> that was the most immoral act ever omitted by a business entity.

    >
    >
    > Did you really mean omitted?


    Oops! "committed"

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 5, 2011
    #18
  19. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/5/2011 4:55 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2011-09-05 13:34:05 -0700, (Ray Fischer) said:
    >
    >> Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>> On 2011-09-05 07:11:56 -0700, PeterN <>
    >>> said:

    >>
    >>> It appears that back in July several members/investigators of the Apple
    >>> security team sought assistance from the SFPD to stand by at a San
    >>> Francisco address which was the last tracked location of the missing
    >>> prototype iPhone 5.
    >>>
    >>> With the four SFPD officers standing by the Apple employees, who at no
    >>> time identified themselves as Apple employees, searched the home and
    >>> did not find the missing iPhone.
    >>> So it appears that the four SFPD officers aided & abetted in a
    >>> warrantless search and violation of the Fourth Amendment.

    >>
    >> Well, no. They asked for and got permission to do the search.
    >> But by pretending to be police officers they committed the crime of
    >> impersonating an officer.

    >
    > However there was the implied threat of ICE intervention, and it seems
    > the SFPD was happy to let the Apple employees take the lead to conduct a
    > search which was questionable.
    > The residents might have not had much choice in letting the search take
    > place given those implications of intimidation.
    >
    > As for somebody more familiar with their rights, given that there were
    > no exigent circumstances, I would would have told those standing at my
    > door, "No warrant, no search. Tell a judge what it is you are looking
    > for, and why you think it is in my home, and come back in the morning."
    >
    > The Fourth Amendment is pretty specific when exigent circumstances are
    > not present, and this little troupe circumvented the Law.
    > They would have had little trouble obtaining a valid search warrant if
    > they had presented a judge with an affidavit spelling out what it was
    > they were searching for, and why they believed it to be at that address
    > on Cava. However that would mean that the SFPD would be the principle
    > and official public reports would have to be made.
    >
    > ...and as a refresher:
    > "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers,
    > and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be
    > violated, and Warrants shall not be issued, but upon probable cause,
    > supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place
    > to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."
    >


    In NY the "silver platter' doctrine would apply and the warrantless
    search would probably be invalid.


    >>
    >>> I guess the idea was to actually keep things quiet so that they would
    >>> not have a repeat of last year's PR fiasco to deal with, but no such
    >>> luck. This is going to be worse.

    >>
    >> Really, what kind of moron takes a phone protoype from Apple and loses
    >> it in a bar?!? It's either a subtle publicity stunt gone very bad or
    >> some really strange corporate culture at Apple.

    >
    > ...or both.
    >



    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 5, 2011
    #19
  20. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 9/5/2011 6:19 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2011-09-05 15:05:07 -0700, PeterN <> said:
    >
    >> On 9/5/2011 4:55 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    >>> On 2011-09-05 13:34:05 -0700, (Ray Fischer) said:
    >>>
    >>>> Savageduck <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>>>> On 2011-09-05 07:11:56 -0700, PeterN <>
    >>>>> said:
    >>>>
    >>>>> It appears that back in July several members/investigators of the
    >>>>> Apple
    >>>>> security team sought assistance from the SFPD to stand by at a San
    >>>>> Francisco address which was the last tracked location of the missing
    >>>>> prototype iPhone 5.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> With the four SFPD officers standing by the Apple employees, who at no
    >>>>> time identified themselves as Apple employees, searched the home and
    >>>>> did not find the missing iPhone.
    >>>>> So it appears that the four SFPD officers aided & abetted in a
    >>>>> warrantless search and violation of the Fourth Amendment.
    >>>>
    >>>> Well, no. They asked for and got permission to do the search.
    >>>> But by pretending to be police officers they committed the crime of
    >>>> impersonating an officer.
    >>>
    >>> However there was the implied threat of ICE intervention, and it seems
    >>> the SFPD was happy to let the Apple employees take the lead to conduct a
    >>> search which was questionable.
    >>> The residents might have not had much choice in letting the search take
    >>> place given those implications of intimidation.
    >>>
    >>> As for somebody more familiar with their rights, given that there were
    >>> no exigent circumstances, I would would have told those standing at my
    >>> door, "No warrant, no search. Tell a judge what it is you are looking
    >>> for, and why you think it is in my home, and come back in the morning."
    >>>
    >>> The Fourth Amendment is pretty specific when exigent circumstances are
    >>> not present, and this little troupe circumvented the Law.
    >>> They would have had little trouble obtaining a valid search warrant if
    >>> they had presented a judge with an affidavit spelling out what it was
    >>> they were searching for, and why they believed it to be at that address
    >>> on Cava. However that would mean that the SFPD would be the principle
    >>> and official public reports would have to be made.
    >>>
    >>> ...and as a refresher:
    >>> "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers,
    >>> and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be
    >>> violated, and Warrants shall not be issued, but upon probable cause,
    >>> supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place
    >>> to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."
    >>>

    >>
    >> In NY the "silver platter' doctrine would apply and the warrantless
    >> search would probably be invalid.

    >
    > Even in California, and therein lies the problem SFPD has to deal with.
    > This might even bring the Feds in to shine a light on the whole affair.
    >
    > Both Apple and SFPD have some 'splainin' to do.
    >
    >>

    Yup! But I doubt if things will go much further. Someone has to
    complain, first, and so far the main complaint seems to be from rich. .

    Rest of remarks unsaid.


    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Sep 6, 2011
    #20
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