Aperture in today's CreativeNews

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Frank ess, Mar 6, 2006.

  1. Frank ess

    Frank ess Guest

    "Framed and Exposed: Zen and the Art of Aperture

    by Ben Long
    creativepro.com senior editor

    If you're considering buying Aperture -- or if you're using
    it now and cursing its rigid workflow structure -- you should
    read this enlightening exploration of the philosophy behind
    Apple's image-editing tool.

    http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/24013.html?cprose=daily

    "
    Frank ess, Mar 6, 2006
    #1
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  2. Frank ess

    rafe b Guest

    "Frank ess" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Framed and Exposed: Zen and the Art of Aperture
    >
    > by Ben Long
    > creativepro.com senior editor
    >
    > If you're considering buying Aperture -- or if you're using
    > it now and cursing its rigid workflow structure -- you should
    > read this enlightening exploration of the philosophy behind
    > Apple's image-editing tool.
    >
    > http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/24013.html?cprose=daily



    Interesting read. I think I can live without it. Aperture, that is.


    rafe b
    www.terrapinphoto.com
    rafe b, Mar 6, 2006
    #2
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  3. Frank ess

    Rich Guest

    On Mon, 6 Mar 2006 09:22:01 -0800, "Frank ess" <>
    wrote:

    >"Framed and Exposed: Zen and the Art of Aperture
    >
    >by Ben Long
    >creativepro.com senior editor
    >
    >If you're considering buying Aperture -- or if you're using
    >it now and cursing its rigid workflow structure -- you should
    >read this enlightening exploration of the philosophy behind
    >Apple's image-editing tool.
    >
    >http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/24013.html?cprose=daily
    >
    >"


    Why can't MAC users just "use" their machines instead of writing them
    poetry?
    -Rich
    Rich, Mar 6, 2006
    #3
  4. Frank ess

    l e o Guest

    Rich wrote:
    > On Mon, 6 Mar 2006 09:22:01 -0800, "Frank ess" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "Framed and Exposed: Zen and the Art of Aperture
    >>
    >> by Ben Long
    >> creativepro.com senior editor
    >>
    >> If you're considering buying Aperture -- or if you're using
    >> it now and cursing its rigid workflow structure -- you should
    >> read this enlightening exploration of the philosophy behind
    >> Apple's image-editing tool.
    >>
    >> http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/24013.html?cprose=daily
    >>
    >> "

    >
    > Why can't MAC users just "use" their machines instead of writing them
    > poetry?
    > -Rich



    Because the author has two aperture books in the pipeline. He has to get
    people interested in it first.
    l e o, Mar 6, 2006
    #4
  5. Frank ess

    Annika1980 Guest

    >Because the author has two aperture books in the pipeline. He has to get
    >people interested in it first.


    I've learned at least one thing from digital photography and using
    Photoshop.
    The real money isn't made using Photoshop. The real money comes from
    giving seminars, workshops, and teaching other people how to use it.
    Annika1980, Mar 7, 2006
    #5
  6. Frank ess

    cjcampbell Guest

    Frank ess wrote:
    > "Framed and Exposed: Zen and the Art of Aperture
    >
    > by Ben Long
    > creativepro.com senior editor
    >
    > If you're considering buying Aperture -- or if you're using
    > it now and cursing its rigid workflow structure -- you should
    > read this enlightening exploration of the philosophy behind
    > Apple's image-editing tool.
    >
    > http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/24013.html?cprose=daily
    >
    > "


    He does do a pretty good job of describing the mindset you need to work
    with Aperture. You have to stop worrying about files. There are really
    only two files; the master and the copy of the master made when you
    exported the file to an external editor. Everything else is already
    taken care of.

    The only real problem with Aperture is that it is very, very, slow.
    Other gripes: inferior raw adjustments, lack of flexibility in
    exporting files for publication, terrible editing tools. Most
    irritating is that Aperture strips a lot of the EXIF information when
    exporting files or creating new masters for use by the external editor.
    That has to stop.

    Although Aperture has its own library, you can inspect the contents of
    the library from Finder. From there you can delete, copy, or do
    anything else with a file within the library that you could from an
    ordinary folder in Finder -- even drag it to the trash. Photo files
    will show up in Finder with little thumbnails, just like they do in any
    other folder. You can even archive these files using Finder, open them
    with any application like normal, and so forth. So if you really insist
    on opening a raw file in Photoshop, simply do it from Finder as you
    normally would. Unfortunately, I have not found a way of viewing the
    package contents with Bridge and some other programs. Photoshop may
    well want to drop an .XMP file into the Aperture library, but this does
    not appear to cause any problems with the library.

    For now, Aperture's benefits seem outweighed by its liabilities. Apple
    promises that ver. 1.1, due any day now (where have we heard that
    before), will run much faster.
    cjcampbell, Mar 7, 2006
    #6
  7. Frank ess

    rafe b Guest

    On 7 Mar 2006 00:37:13 -0800, "cjcampbell"
    <> wrote:


    >He does do a pretty good job of describing the mindset you need to work
    >with Aperture. You have to stop worrying about files. There are really
    >only two files; the master and the copy of the master made when you
    >exported the file to an external editor. Everything else is already
    >taken care of.



    Why would I want to stop thinking about files?

    This is like governing without thinking about
    policy, budgets, and social welfare.

    Or practicing medicine without thinking of
    organs, body fluids, and cells.


    rafe b
    www.terrapinphoto.com
    rafe b, Mar 7, 2006
    #7
  8. Frank ess

    cjcampbell Guest

    rafe b wrote:
    > On 7 Mar 2006 00:37:13 -0800, "cjcampbell"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >He does do a pretty good job of describing the mindset you need to work
    > >with Aperture. You have to stop worrying about files. There are really
    > >only two files; the master and the copy of the master made when you
    > >exported the file to an external editor. Everything else is already
    > >taken care of.

    >
    >
    > Why would I want to stop thinking about files?


    I did not mean to imply that. Poorly worded. But you have to think
    about files a little differently than what you are used to. With
    Aperture you have to get used to thinking in terms of versions and
    masters. Strictly speaking, there is a separate file within the library
    for each version; it is just very small. This file is simply a list of
    changes made to the master in order to get that version.

    Pictures (as opposed to files) are organized in projects, albums,
    books, etc. A single picture, whether it is a version or a master, can
    appear simultaneously in several of these locations, but there is still
    only one master file and only one version file for that picture. A
    change to a particular vesion in one location will change it everywhere
    else. Stacking the photo in one location creates that stack everywhere
    else. Making the photo the pick in a stack in one location makes it the
    pick everywhere else. If you want a particular photo to be modified in
    one location then you just create a new version for that location. All
    that does is create a new version file, which is very small. Deleting
    that version leaves the master intact. Deleting a master deletes all
    the versions everywhere (and it brings up a warning message that this
    will happen). Even then, deleting the master simply moves it to an
    Aperture folder in the Trash, where it could be recovered if necessary.

    There is a real value to all this; Aperture's sorting and searching
    utilities are very powerful. You can create smart albums, smart web
    sites, and smart books all using various sorting criteria. Thus, a web
    site that shows only your 5 star pictures could be created, or a book
    showing all your 5 star pictures with the category key word "night" and
    the key word "carnival" and the location "Laoag" could be created.

    You can also create various light tables -- arrangements of your
    pictures, and set them up however you want. It does not matter much
    whether each picture is a master or a version; Aperture treats them all
    as if they were individual files.

    Suppose you have shot a series of photos and you want to compare them
    to see which is best. You can set up a comparison photo and compare
    each photo in turn to that one. You can change which is the comparison
    photo with a single keystroke. You don't need to know which are
    versions or which are masters; you only work with versions anyway. All
    the file information can be displayed in a pane on the right side.
    Aperture is designed to work mainly with camera raw files. Most of your
    masters will be raw files, but the moment you choose to export a file
    for any reason you can choose what type of file you want and just
    export it. It really does not matter whether you are exporting a
    version or a master because for practical purposes you can just
    consider them "picture files." You can print versions from within
    Aperture.
    cjcampbell, Mar 8, 2006
    #8
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