Anyone recommend a router?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Tony Williams, Aug 16, 2007.

  1. My friend lives in an old Victorian house in London. It has three floors and
    a basement. They are using a Belkin F5D 7630-4A router and are constantly
    getting dropped connections and wireless in only two floors, none on the top
    floor or in the basement. It is a few years old. He is looking to buy a new
    wireless router but before doing so would like some recommendations on a
    home router that has a signal strength that will reach all floors through
    thick brick walls, a big ask I know! Anyone any ideas?
    Thanks
    Tony
    Tony Williams, Aug 16, 2007
    #1
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  2. On Thu, 16 Aug 2007 15:48:44 +0100, "Tony Williams" <>
    wrote:

    >My friend lives in an old Victorian house in London. It has three floors and
    >a basement. They are using a Belkin F5D 7630-4A router and are constantly
    >getting dropped connections and wireless in only two floors, none on the top
    >floor or in the basement. It is a few years old. He is looking to buy a new
    >wireless router but before doing so would like some recommendations on a
    >home router that has a signal strength that will reach all floors through
    >thick brick walls, a big ask I know! Anyone any ideas?
    >Thanks
    >Tony
    >


    Maybe add a (wired) access point to the top floor? If wiring is
    completely out of the question, try a repeater to extend the range of
    the wireless.... might have to try several locations. Also,
    directional antenna might help.

    --
    Charlie Hoffpauir
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
    Charlie Hoffpauir, Aug 16, 2007
    #2
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  3. Thanks for those suggestions Charlie Any ideas? on a good router?
    Tony
    "Charlie Hoffpauir" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 16 Aug 2007 15:48:44 +0100, "Tony Williams" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>My friend lives in an old Victorian house in London. It has three floors
    >>and
    >>a basement. They are using a Belkin F5D 7630-4A router and are constantly
    >>getting dropped connections and wireless in only two floors, none on the
    >>top
    >>floor or in the basement. It is a few years old. He is looking to buy a
    >>new
    >>wireless router but before doing so would like some recommendations on a
    >>home router that has a signal strength that will reach all floors through
    >>thick brick walls, a big ask I know! Anyone any ideas?
    >>Thanks
    >>Tony
    >>

    >
    > Maybe add a (wired) access point to the top floor? If wiring is
    > completely out of the question, try a repeater to extend the range of
    > the wireless.... might have to try several locations. Also,
    > directional antenna might help.
    >
    > --
    > Charlie Hoffpauir
    > http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
    Tony Williams, Aug 16, 2007
    #3
  4. On Thu, 16 Aug 2007 16:34:48 +0100, "Tony Williams" <>
    wrote:

    >Thanks for those suggestions Charlie Any ideas? on a good router?
    >Tony


    I actually don't think the brand matters a lot. I have a Linksys
    WRT54G that I use to network my computers (wired and wireless) and a
    Netgear WGR614, refurbished that I bought for $15 to network my
    (wired) Tivos, and they both seem to operate fine in both wired and
    wireless. The service thch that repaired my transmitter for my
    Hughesnet service said that the Linksys was a much better router,
    though.

    --
    Charlie Hoffpauir
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
    Charlie Hoffpauir, Aug 16, 2007
    #4
  5. Thanks Charlie
    "Charlie Hoffpauir" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Thu, 16 Aug 2007 16:34:48 +0100, "Tony Williams" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Thanks for those suggestions Charlie Any ideas? on a good router?
    >>Tony

    >
    > I actually don't think the brand matters a lot. I have a Linksys
    > WRT54G that I use to network my computers (wired and wireless) and a
    > Netgear WGR614, refurbished that I bought for $15 to network my
    > (wired) Tivos, and they both seem to operate fine in both wired and
    > wireless. The service thch that repaired my transmitter for my
    > Hughesnet service said that the Linksys was a much better router,
    > though.
    >
    > --
    > Charlie Hoffpauir
    > http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~charlieh/
    Tony Williams, Aug 16, 2007
    #5
  6. Tony Williams

    Lem Guest

    Tony Williams wrote:
    > My friend lives in an old Victorian house in London. It has three floors and
    > a basement. They are using a Belkin F5D 7630-4A router and are constantly
    > getting dropped connections and wireless in only two floors, none on the top
    > floor or in the basement. It is a few years old. He is looking to buy a new
    > wireless router but before doing so would like some recommendations on a
    > home router that has a signal strength that will reach all floors through
    > thick brick walls, a big ask I know! Anyone any ideas?
    > Thanks
    > Tony
    >
    >


    Charlie's suggestion of a wireless AP on the top floor connected by
    Ethernet cable to the main router is the most reliable way of achieving
    coverage. See this write-up from MS-MVP Jack:
    http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html

    Alternatively, Buffalo makes a wireless router, the WHR-HP-G54, that has
    a built-in signal amplifier. I assume this is available in the UK.
    Here's a US mailorder link:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16833162134

    The fallacy I see with this device is that communication must be 2-way
    -- it does you no good if the wireless adapter in your computer can
    "hear" the transmission from the router if the transmitter in the
    computer's adapter is so weak that the router's receiver can't "hear"
    its corresponding transmissions.

    Buffalo touts some of its adapters for use with the above router, but
    but I can't find anything that suggests that the adapters themselves
    have an RF amplifier.
    http://www.buffalo-technology.com/technology/our-technology/high-power/

    Most of the "name brand" home WiFi device manufacturers (Linksys,
    Netgear, DLink, Buffalo, Belkin) have models that are supposed to extend
    range. Generally, you need to buy both the router and the adapter from
    the same manufacturer and in the same "family." Read the descriptions
    carefully, including footnotes and asterisked comments.

    Finally, most of the name brand also have "pre-N" or "draft N" devices,
    which refers to the yet-to-be-ratified 802.11n standard. These devices
    also are supposed to be faster and longer range, but also will only give
    these advantages when paired devices from the same manufacturer are
    used. Further, they are not "guaranteed" to comply with whatever
    finally becomes the 802.11n standard. Barb Bowman, a frequent MS-MVP
    poster here, often recommends the D-Link DIR-655 Draft N router.

    It's difficult to know if any of these solutions will help in your
    particular environment without actually buying them and trying them out.

    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    Lem, Aug 16, 2007
    #6
  7. Hi
    I would start with one unit of this, and then if needed add more units
    either with cables, or forming a WDS Network.
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Buffalo-AirStation-WHR-HP-G54-Wireless-Router/dp/B000E1R3C8
    Why? http://www.ezlan.net/buffalo.html
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Tony Williams" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My friend lives in an old Victorian house in London. It has three floors
    > and a basement. They are using a Belkin F5D 7630-4A router and are
    > constantly getting dropped connections and wireless in only two floors,
    > none on the top floor or in the basement. It is a few years old. He is
    > looking to buy a new wireless router but before doing so would like some
    > recommendations on a home router that has a signal strength that will
    > reach all floors through thick brick walls, a big ask I know! Anyone any
    > ideas?
    > Thanks
    > Tony
    >
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Aug 17, 2007
    #7
  8. Thanks Lem really useful tips
    Tony
    "Lem" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Tony Williams wrote:
    >> My friend lives in an old Victorian house in London. It has three floors
    >> and a basement. They are using a Belkin F5D 7630-4A router and are
    >> constantly getting dropped connections and wireless in only two floors,
    >> none on the top floor or in the basement. It is a few years old. He is
    >> looking to buy a new wireless router but before doing so would like some
    >> recommendations on a home router that has a signal strength that will
    >> reach all floors through thick brick walls, a big ask I know! Anyone any
    >> ideas?
    >> Thanks
    >> Tony

    >
    > Charlie's suggestion of a wireless AP on the top floor connected by
    > Ethernet cable to the main router is the most reliable way of achieving
    > coverage. See this write-up from MS-MVP Jack:
    > http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html
    >
    > Alternatively, Buffalo makes a wireless router, the WHR-HP-G54, that has a
    > built-in signal amplifier. I assume this is available in the UK. Here's a
    > US mailorder link:
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16833162134
    >
    > The fallacy I see with this device is that communication must be 2-way --
    > it does you no good if the wireless adapter in your computer can "hear"
    > the transmission from the router if the transmitter in the computer's
    > adapter is so weak that the router's receiver can't "hear" its
    > corresponding transmissions.
    >
    > Buffalo touts some of its adapters for use with the above router, but but
    > I can't find anything that suggests that the adapters themselves have an
    > RF amplifier.
    > http://www.buffalo-technology.com/technology/our-technology/high-power/
    >
    > Most of the "name brand" home WiFi device manufacturers (Linksys, Netgear,
    > DLink, Buffalo, Belkin) have models that are supposed to extend range.
    > Generally, you need to buy both the router and the adapter from the same
    > manufacturer and in the same "family." Read the descriptions carefully,
    > including footnotes and asterisked comments.
    >
    > Finally, most of the name brand also have "pre-N" or "draft N" devices,
    > which refers to the yet-to-be-ratified 802.11n standard. These devices
    > also are supposed to be faster and longer range, but also will only give
    > these advantages when paired devices from the same manufacturer are used.
    > Further, they are not "guaranteed" to comply with whatever finally becomes
    > the 802.11n standard. Barb Bowman, a frequent MS-MVP poster here, often
    > recommends the D-Link DIR-655 Draft N router.
    >
    > It's difficult to know if any of these solutions will help in your
    > particular environment without actually buying them and trying them out.
    >
    > --
    > Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    Tony Williams, Aug 17, 2007
    #8
  9. Thanks Jack
    Tony
    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi
    > I would start with one unit of this, and then if needed add more units
    > either with cables, or forming a WDS Network.
    > http://www.amazon.co.uk/Buffalo-AirStation-WHR-HP-G54-Wireless-Router/dp/B000E1R3C8
    > Why? http://www.ezlan.net/buffalo.html
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    > "Tony Williams" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> My friend lives in an old Victorian house in London. It has three floors
    >> and a basement. They are using a Belkin F5D 7630-4A router and are
    >> constantly getting dropped connections and wireless in only two floors,
    >> none on the top floor or in the basement. It is a few years old. He is
    >> looking to buy a new wireless router but before doing so would like some
    >> recommendations on a home router that has a signal strength that will
    >> reach all floors through thick brick walls, a big ask I know! Anyone any
    >> ideas?
    >> Thanks
    >> Tony
    >>

    >
    >
    Tony Williams, Aug 17, 2007
    #9
  10. Radio waves are radio waves. They all use more-or-less the same power
    because it is a "standard" and is regulated by the FCC. The brand should
    not matter much although Linksys tends to have performance problems with FTP
    transfers,..but then that has nothing to do with the wireless component.

    Dipole antennas do not transcieve well vertically,..they are built to work
    horizontally. You might improve it somewhat by turning one mast so it is
    horizontal and leave the other one vertical. Other than that you need to
    just add more WAPs,...perhaps a WAP on two of the floors with the "router"
    on the floor it is on. Connect the WAPs to the "router" via hardwire.


    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------

    "Tony Williams" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > My friend lives in an old Victorian house in London. It has three floors
    > and a basement. They are using a Belkin F5D 7630-4A router and are
    > constantly getting dropped connections and wireless in only two floors,
    > none on the top floor or in the basement. It is a few years old. He is
    > looking to buy a new wireless router but before doing so would like some
    > recommendations on a home router that has a signal strength that will
    > reach all floors through thick brick walls, a big ask I know! Anyone any
    > ideas?
    > Thanks
    > Tony
    >
    Phillip Windell, Aug 17, 2007
    #10
  11. Thanks Phil
    Tony
    "Phillip Windell" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Radio waves are radio waves. They all use more-or-less the same power
    > because it is a "standard" and is regulated by the FCC. The brand should
    > not matter much although Linksys tends to have performance problems with
    > FTP transfers,..but then that has nothing to do with the wireless
    > component.
    >
    > Dipole antennas do not transcieve well vertically,..they are built to work
    > horizontally. You might improve it somewhat by turning one mast so it is
    > horizontal and leave the other one vertical. Other than that you need to
    > just add more WAPs,...perhaps a WAP on two of the floors with the "router"
    > on the floor it is on. Connect the WAPs to the "router" via hardwire.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Phillip Windell
    > www.wandtv.com
    >
    > The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or
    > Microsoft, or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    > -----------------------------------------------------
    >
    > "Tony Williams" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> My friend lives in an old Victorian house in London. It has three floors
    >> and a basement. They are using a Belkin F5D 7630-4A router and are
    >> constantly getting dropped connections and wireless in only two floors,
    >> none on the top floor or in the basement. It is a few years old. He is
    >> looking to buy a new wireless router but before doing so would like some
    >> recommendations on a home router that has a signal strength that will
    >> reach all floors through thick brick walls, a big ask I know! Anyone any
    >> ideas?
    >> Thanks
    >> Tony
    >>

    >
    >
    Tony Williams, Aug 17, 2007
    #11
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