Any way to determine a player's error correction?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Mike Stockman, Dec 29, 2004.

  1. (Note: I searched the archives before posting this without luck, sorry
    if it's been covered before...)

    We've been using a cheap JVC DVD XV-D701 player for a few years, and
    have occasionally (well, more than occasionally) been annoyed at its
    failures with scratched DVDs. When I try the same DVDs in my computers
    (Mac and PC), the DVDs play flawlessly, suggesting that the JVC
    player's error correction is (to put it politely) less-than-optimal.

    So I'm shopping for a new player, but I can't find any pre-sale
    information on error correction... is there a marketing bullet-point I
    can watch for? Reviews don't appear to cover this, either although
    people keep saying anecdotally that Panasonic players handle damaged
    DVDs better than others.
    Any way to discover this info before I buy?

    Thanks,
    Mike
    Mike Stockman, Dec 29, 2004
    #1
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  2. Mike Stockman

    troll Guest

    yes, go here: http://www.plsgoogleit.com



    "Mike Stockman" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > (Note: I searched the archives before posting this without luck, sorry
    > if it's been covered before...)
    >
    > We've been using a cheap JVC DVD XV-D701 player for a few years, and
    > have occasionally (well, more than occasionally) been annoyed at its
    > failures with scratched DVDs. When I try the same DVDs in my computers
    > (Mac and PC), the DVDs play flawlessly, suggesting that the JVC
    > player's error correction is (to put it politely) less-than-optimal.
    >
    > So I'm shopping for a new player, but I can't find any pre-sale
    > information on error correction... is there a marketing bullet-point I
    > can watch for? Reviews don't appear to cover this, either although
    > people keep saying anecdotally that Panasonic players handle damaged
    > DVDs better than others.
    > Any way to discover this info before I buy?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Mike
    >
    troll, Dec 29, 2004
    #2
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  3. Any real replies?

    I should think it obvious from my opening statement that I did some
    research, including Google searches, before asking. It's unclear from
    the information I could find whether there's anything I can look for
    *before* buying to determine error correction quality.

    Thanks,
    Mike
    Mike Stockman, Dec 30, 2004
    #3
  4. Mike Stockman

    JF Sebastian Guest

    Mike Stockman wrote:
    > So I'm shopping for a new player, but I can't find any pre-sale
    > information on error correction... is there a marketing bullet-point I
    > can watch for?


    I'd say not, this technical mumbo-jumbo is nothing you could really make
    use of for marketing (except sticking a label "super fuzzy corrector" to
    it, but that doesn't solve your problem).

    In general, error correction is only one part of the system. A good
    error correction is no excuse for a cheap laser pickup in the first
    place. Looking at CD players I've seen visibly dirty laser optics in
    Denon players still working almost fine after years while what seemed to
    be a clean lens in a cheap no-name something actually needed a cleaning
    after just 10 months.
    Apart from that I wonder if there can be something like good and bad
    error correction anyway since this is pure mathematics. 1+1 should be
    the same anywhere.

    I'd say simply watch out for some quality product, pay a few bucks more
    and be happy with it. AFAIK patent license fees for a DVD player already
    sum up to some US$ 35, so you shouldn't expect anything from a Chinese
    made player that sells for 39.95.
    With a quality player from a well known manufacturer you can always
    complain and demand a solution with a reason. You'd expect a flawless
    product and, should something fail, perfect after-sales service from a
    $150,000-Porsche, too, wouldn't you?
    JF Sebastian, Jan 1, 2005
    #4
  5. Thanks for the reply, JF... that's what I was afraid of. I guess I'll
    keep watching for those "Gosh, the disc was so scratched but my [Insert
    brand here] played it flawlessly anyhow" postings and buy one of
    those... ;-) I've actually seen those for Panasonic players, so I may
    end up with that for lack of any other options.

    That might not work out too badly for a really stupid reason: I have a
    Panasonic TV and wouldn't mind reducing the number of remotes... ;-)
    Thanks again...
    Mike
    Mike Stockman, Jan 2, 2005
    #5
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