Any Tips on taking pictures of bronze statues in bright sunshine?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by jbert, Jul 8, 2005.

  1. jbert

    jbert Guest

    Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and back
    ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'. Thanks. JAB
    jbert, Jul 8, 2005
    #1
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  2. jbert

    Ted Guest

    "jbert" <> wrote in message
    news:damj3u$bs5$...
    > Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    > Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and back
    > ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'. Thanks. JAB
    >


    fill flash perhaps...........manually adjust it until desired expo is
    reached.......experiment
    Ted, Jul 8, 2005
    #2
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  3. jbert

    Pete D Guest

    I would think that underexposing a stop or so will stop you blowing any
    higlights, then adjust in post. You could always wait till it is clouded
    over a little. What camera are we talking here?

    "jbert" <> wrote in message
    news:damj3u$bs5$...
    > Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    > Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and back
    > ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'. Thanks. JAB
    >
    Pete D, Jul 8, 2005
    #3
  4. jbert

    Jim Guest

    "jbert" <> wrote in message
    news:damj3u$bs5$...
    > Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    > Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and back
    > ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'. Thanks. JAB
    >

    Spot metering is doomed to failure. What the camera is doing is attempting
    to make the dark bronze 18% gray. Thus, those parts of the scene which are
    really much brighter will be washed out.

    Matrix metering would be more appropriate, but you need to pay attention to
    the histogram. Correct the exposure until there are histogram levels all
    the way across the image.

    Jim
    Jim, Jul 8, 2005
    #4
  5. jbert

    Mark² Guest

    "jbert" <> wrote in message
    news:damj3u$bs5$...
    > Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    > Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and back
    > ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'. Thanks. JAB


    This is where in incident meter is helpful, because it will meter for the
    scene, rather than the subject.
    You can also use a grey card, but a good substitute for a grey card is
    healthy, green grass. It's very close to a good middle tone. So...meter on
    some grass that's in the same light...compose the shot, focus and bing.

    You'd do well to not shoot under high, bright sun. Shoot them in early
    morning or late afternoon with low-angled sunlight. Not only will this give
    you far better balance between the statue's illumination and it's
    surroundings, but it will give the statue more depth because of dramatic
    shadow angles...and...the shadows won't be so harsh.
    Mark², Jul 8, 2005
    #5
  6. Mark² wrote:
    > "jbert" <> wrote in message
    > news:damj3u$bs5$...
    >
    >>Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    >>Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and back
    >>ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'. Thanks. JAB

    >
    >
    > This is where in incident meter is helpful, because it will meter for the
    > scene, rather than the subject.
    > You can also use a grey card, but a good substitute for a grey card is
    > healthy, green grass. It's very close to a good middle tone. So...meter on
    > some grass that's in the same light...compose the shot, focus and bing.
    >
    > You'd do well to not shoot under high, bright sun. Shoot them in early
    > morning or late afternoon with low-angled sunlight. Not only will this give
    > you far better balance between the statue's illumination and it's
    > surroundings, but it will give the statue more depth because of dramatic
    > shadow angles...and...the shadows won't be so harsh.
    >

    In other words, be aware of the statue's limitation on illumination....

    Another way is to shoot RAW, then set one conversion to, say + 1.5 stops
    and the other to -1.5 stops. Then using a mask on one, after importing
    and lining them up in one windwo, to paint in the statue or the
    background, whichever you prefer.

    --

    John McWilliams
    John McWilliams, Jul 8, 2005
    #6
  7. jbert wrote:
    > Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    > Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and
    > back ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'.
    > Thanks. JAB


    Pick the time of day and the weather to provide the lighting of choice.
    Bring a large reflector to provide some adjustment. Personally I like to
    see clouds in the background.


    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
    Joseph Meehan, Jul 9, 2005
    #7
  8. jbert

    Marvin Guest

    jbert wrote:
    > Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    > Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and back
    > ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'. Thanks. JAB
    >

    You can do a lot with a good image editing program; I use Paint Shop Pro. You can adjust
    contrast. You can select just the statue and lighten that part of the image. With the
    camera on atripod, you can take two exposures - one that is right for the statue and the
    other set for the background. Then select the statue from the first picture and paste it
    into the second.
    Marvin, Jul 9, 2005
    #8
  9. jbert

    Paul Heslop Guest

    Marvin wrote:
    >
    > jbert wrote:
    > > Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    > > Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and back
    > > ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'. Thanks. JAB
    > >

    > You can do a lot with a good image editing program; I use Paint Shop Pro. You can adjust
    > contrast. You can select just the statue and lighten that part of the image.


    I use PSP and I think curves does a good job of bringing up parts of
    an image too, you can lighten or darken this way. I took this picture
    some time ago, no idea what I was doing (not much different now!) but
    you could see hardly anything on the figure, a black sillhuoette
    against the sky. Then someone told me about curves and I was able to
    bring up the detail without ruining the sky behind

    http://groups.msn.com/OtherSides/statuary.msnw?action=ShowPhoto&PhotoID=683

    --
    Paul (And I'm, like, "yeah, whatever!")
    -------------------------------------------------------
    Stop and Look
    http://www.geocities.com/dreamst8me/
    Paul Heslop, Jul 9, 2005
    #9
  10. jbert

    M-M Guest

    In article <damj3u$bs5$>,
    jbert <> wrote:

    > Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    > Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and back
    > ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'. Thanks. JAB


    Yea, wait till it's cloudy. Otherwise you will have overexposed areas.

    m-m
    M-M, Jul 9, 2005
    #10
  11. jbert

    jbert Guest

    Thanks for all the responses. I will try to put some of them to use.
    Unfortunately, these statues pictures will be taken on vacation when I
    can't control the timing, weather or my wife who gets a bit impatient
    after a while. And after taking 1000 images, I don't have much time or
    desire to post process them. Just looking for a way to get a descent
    snap shot.
    JAB
    jbert, Jul 11, 2005
    #11
  12. jbert

    Roe Thomas Guest

    Hello JAB; I will recommend that you become comfortable with using a
    flash for fill, you will I'm sure find this enhances many of your
    photos. Just ignore the nit-wits that recomend you wait for the time of
    day or the season when the light may be "right". Roe

    jbert wrote:

    > Thanks for all the responses. I will try to put some of them to use.
    > Unfortunately, these statues pictures will be taken on vacation when I
    > can't control the timing, weather or my wife who gets a bit impatient
    > after a while. And after taking 1000 images, I don't have much time or
    > desire to post process them. Just looking for a way to get a descent
    > snap shot.
    > JAB
    Roe Thomas, Jul 14, 2005
    #12
  13. jbert

    M-M Guest

    In article <>,
    Roe Thomas <> wrote:

    > I will recommend that you become comfortable with using a
    > flash for fill, you will I'm sure find this enhances many of your
    > photos. Just ignore the nit-wits that recomend you wait for the time of
    > day or the season when the light may be "right". Roe


    Granted a fill flash can do a lot, but you're really pushing it to try
    it on a shiny metal statue at a distance in the sunlight.

    m-m
    M-M, Jul 14, 2005
    #13
  14. M-M <> wrote:
    : In article <>,
    : Roe Thomas <> wrote:

    : > I will recommend that you become comfortable with using a
    : > flash for fill, you will I'm sure find this enhances many of your
    : > photos. Just ignore the nit-wits that recomend you wait for the time of
    : > day or the season when the light may be "right". Roe

    : Granted a fill flash can do a lot, but you're really pushing it to try
    : it on a shiny metal statue at a distance in the sunlight.

    Maybe we can agree that different situations, different ambient
    lighting, and different available equipment may require different
    solutions. It is obvious that there is no one way to get "good" photos of
    statuary. In some situations, and some subjects, a fill flash may help. In
    others just positioning the camera to allow a mid contrast background may
    bring out the desired details. And in other situations, nothing short of a
    full Hollywood lighting crew will give acceptable results. :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, Jul 15, 2005
    #14
  15. jbert

    M-M Guest

    In article <db7d0m$ruo$>,
    Randy Berbaum <> wrote:

    > It is obvious that there is no one way to get "good" photos of
    > statuary.


    I once wanted to test a new telephoto lens so I chose the intricate
    concrete castings around a government building as the subject. Far away,
    lots of detail and no movement to contend with.

    I was disappointed that it was a dreary, cloudy day but did the shoot
    anyhow. Boy was I pleased with the results- little did I know but I
    could not have asked for better lighting!

    m-m
    M-M, Jul 15, 2005
    #15
  16. M-M <> wrote:

    : I once wanted to test a new telephoto lens so I chose the intricate
    : concrete castings around a government building as the subject. Far away,
    : lots of detail and no movement to contend with.

    : I was disappointed that it was a dreary, cloudy day but did the shoot
    : anyhow. Boy was I pleased with the results- little did I know but I
    : could not have asked for better lighting!

    I agree. For many subjects a cloudy day gives spectacular results. A good
    soft light makes many subjects much easier to capture. And durring the
    "hot months" a cloudy day is much more comfortable (to me). :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, Jul 15, 2005
    #16
  17. jbert

    Mark² Guest

    "M-M" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <db7d0m$ruo$>,
    > Randy Berbaum <> wrote:
    >
    >> It is obvious that there is no one way to get "good" photos of
    >> statuary.

    >
    > I once wanted to test a new telephoto lens so I chose the intricate
    > concrete castings around a government building as the subject. Far away,
    > lots of detail and no movement to contend with.
    >
    > I was disappointed that it was a dreary, cloudy day but did the shoot
    > anyhow. Boy was I pleased with the results- little did I know but I
    > could not have asked for better lighting!


    Overcast days are great for when you want to avoid harsh shadows.
    Great for people pictures, too, so long as you've got a filter or white
    balance setting.

    I remember on my wedding day...saying to the photographer something like,
    "Sorry we don't have any sun..."
    His response was, "No way! This is the absoute BEST day for shooting
    outside weddings! -No face shadows...no people squinting...etc."
    Mark², Jul 15, 2005
    #17
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