Any tips for shooting through glass?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Andy Blanchard, Jul 24, 2004.

  1. I will shortly be making a trip The Blue Planet which is, as the name
    implies, essentially a zoo specialising in water creatures, many of
    which are obviously going to in aquariums of varying sizes. Naturally
    I'll be taking my 10D and a selection of lenses, but I've not had much
    call to attempt this before and the results were less than stellar, to
    say the least.

    Does anyone have any tips to improve my success rate? I've got UV0
    filters on all my lenses, so I'm not averse to putting the lens flush
    against the glass or anything like that. What about using a circular
    polarisers or some other filter - useful or waste of time? Are there
    any particular exposure settings that work better than others?

    Thanks in advance,
    Andy
    Andy Blanchard, Jul 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. Andy Blanchard

    Sabineellen Guest

    use manual focus
    Sabineellen, Jul 24, 2004
    #2
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  3. Andy Blanchard

    Matt Ion Guest

    "Andy Blanchard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I will shortly be making a trip The Blue Planet which is, as the name
    > implies, essentially a zoo specialising in water creatures, many of
    > which are obviously going to in aquariums of varying sizes. Naturally
    > I'll be taking my 10D and a selection of lenses, but I've not had much
    > call to attempt this before and the results were less than stellar, to
    > say the least.
    >
    > Does anyone have any tips to improve my success rate? I've got UV0
    > filters on all my lenses, so I'm not averse to putting the lens flush
    > against the glass or anything like that. What about using a circular
    > polarisers or some other filter - useful or waste of time? Are there
    > any particular exposure settings that work better than others?


    Keep your aperture open to minimize depth of focus, and focus manually
    (autofocus could be fooled by marks in the glass). Try to focus past the
    glass as much as possible.
    Matt Ion, Jul 24, 2004
    #3
  4. Andy Blanchard

    Charles Guest

    On Sat, 24 Jul 2004 01:05:58 +0100, Andy Blanchard
    <> wrote:

    >I will shortly be making a trip The Blue Planet which is, as the name
    >implies, essentially a zoo specialising in water creatures, many of
    >which are obviously going to in aquariums of varying sizes. Naturally
    >I'll be taking my 10D and a selection of lenses, but I've not had much
    >call to attempt this before and the results were less than stellar, to
    >say the least.
    >
    >Does anyone have any tips to improve my success rate? I've got UV0
    >filters on all my lenses, so I'm not averse to putting the lens flush
    >against the glass or anything like that. What about using a circular
    >polarisers or some other filter - useful or waste of time? Are there
    >any particular exposure settings that work better than others?
    >
    >Thanks in advance,
    >Andy



    Get close to the glass, use a rubber sunshade and leave it in direct
    contact with the glass to avoid reflections.


    --

    - Charles
    -
    -does not play well with others
    Charles, Jul 24, 2004
    #4
  5. Andy Blanchard <> writes:

    > I will shortly be making a trip The Blue Planet which is, as the name
    > implies, essentially a zoo specialising in water creatures, many of
    > which are obviously going to in aquariums of varying sizes. Naturally
    > I'll be taking my 10D and a selection of lenses, but I've not had much
    > call to attempt this before and the results were less than stellar, to
    > say the least.
    >
    > Does anyone have any tips to improve my success rate? I've got UV0
    > filters on all my lenses, so I'm not averse to putting the lens flush
    > against the glass or anything like that. What about using a circular
    > polarisers or some other filter - useful or waste of time? Are there
    > any particular exposure settings that work better than others?


    One of the biggest problems is, of course, reflections off the glass.
    A rubber lens shade will help immensely with this -- it can be put
    directly against the glass, sealing out all outside light.
    Reflections will also mess up auto-focus.

    If it's like the ones I've shot at, you'll need a very fast ISO
    setting, and will still have slow shutter speeds.

    There are 5 shots through glass into water tanks at the zoo here
    <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/gallery/Zoo%204-Jan-2003/>.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
    David Dyer-Bennet, Jul 24, 2004
    #5
  6. Andy Blanchard

    Guest

    Rubber lens hoods (was: Re: Any tips for shooting through glass?)

    Kibo informs me that Charles <> stated that:

    >Get close to the glass, use a rubber sunshade and leave it in direct
    >contact with the glass to avoid reflections.


    Speaking of rubber lens hoods, can anyone recommend a source of them
    suitable for Canon EF lenses? Bonus points for cheap prices, &
    international availablility. :)

    --
    W
    . | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
    \|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
    ---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
    , Jul 24, 2004
    #6
  7. Re: Rubber lens hoods (was: Re: Any tips for shooting through glass?)

    <> wrote:
    > Kibo informs me that Charles <> stated that:
    >
    > >Get close to the glass, use a rubber sunshade and leave it in direct
    > >contact with the glass to avoid reflections.

    >
    > Speaking of rubber lens hoods, can anyone recommend a source of them
    > suitable for Canon EF lenses?


    FWIW, the Mamiya 645ProTL lens hood for the 80 and 110mm lenses works on the
    50/1.4 Canon lens on the 300D. There is a problem, though: if you push on
    the glass to keep the lens hood flush, that pressure fights the lens
    focusing motion when AF kicks in. Oops.

    Also, FWIW, the Pentax RH-RB77 hood works on the 17-40, without the focus
    fight problem. While the Mamiya hood appears to be useful as a hood for the
    50/1.4, the Pentax hood seems too wide to be any good as a normal hood for
    the 17-40. But it does seem to be the right thing for glass reflections.

    > Bonus points for cheap prices, & international availablility. :)


    The Pentax hood set me back US$20 or so in Tokyo. I'd guess anyone who
    carries MF equipment would have these hoods. B&H???

    David J. Littleboy

    Tokyo, Japan
    David J. Littleboy, Jul 24, 2004
    #7
  8. Andy Blanchard

    Charles Guest

    Re: Rubber lens hoods (was: Re: Any tips for shooting through glass?)

    On Sat, 24 Jul 2004 16:26:21 +1000, wrote:

    >Kibo informs me that Charles <> stated that:
    >
    >>Get close to the glass, use a rubber sunshade and leave it in direct
    >>contact with the glass to avoid reflections.

    >
    >Speaking of rubber lens hoods, can anyone recommend a source of them
    >suitable for Canon EF lenses? Bonus points for cheap prices, &
    >international availablility. :)



    Porters has them for $8.25 to $10.95.

    I don't know if they ship international

    www.porters.com


    A good place for odd stuff. their prices can be beaten on a lot of
    things, but they are a good place to look.


    --

    - Charles
    -
    -does not play well with others
    Charles, Jul 24, 2004
    #8
  9. Andy Blanchard

    Mikey S. Guest

    Re: Rubber lens hoods (was: Re: Any tips for shooting through glass?)

    B&h has everything, you just have to find it...

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/ .. navigate to
    Home < Cameras & Photo Gear < 35mm Systems < Body & Lens Accessories < Lens
    Accessories < Lens Hoods (Generic) and select rubber (flexible) and choose
    the size

    --

    Mikey S.
    http://www.mike721.com


    <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Speaking of rubber lens hoods, can anyone recommend a source of them
    > suitable for Canon EF lenses? Bonus points for cheap prices, &
    > international availablility. :)
    >
    Mikey S., Jul 24, 2004
    #9
  10. Andy Blanchard

    Paul W. Ross Guest

    Re: Rubber lens hoods (was: Re: Any tips for shooting through glass?)

    I've bought a number of them from B&H -- $7- $10 range, both for
    Series 7, 49mm, and 55mm.

    I have pretty well given up on metal lens hoods. They "ding" easily,
    and are always getting the pain chipped off, making them rather
    unsightly. I need to spray paint a couple with the aluminum bonding
    epoxy stuff that they sell for firearms. THAT should cure the problem!
    Paul W. Ross, Jul 24, 2004
    #10
  11. David Dyer-Bennet wrote:

    > Andy Blanchard <> writes:
    >
    >
    >>I will shortly be making a trip The Blue Planet which is, as the name
    >>implies, essentially a zoo specialising in water creatures, many of
    >>which are obviously going to in aquariums of varying sizes. Naturally
    >>I'll be taking my 10D and a selection of lenses, but I've not had much
    >>call to attempt this before and the results were less than stellar, to
    >>say the least.
    >>
    >>Does anyone have any tips to improve my success rate? I've got UV0
    >>filters on all my lenses, so I'm not averse to putting the lens flush
    >>against the glass or anything like that. What about using a circular
    >>polarisers or some other filter - useful or waste of time? Are there
    >>any particular exposure settings that work better than others?

    >
    >
    > One of the biggest problems is, of course, reflections off the glass.
    > A rubber lens shade will help immensely with this -- it can be put
    > directly against the glass, sealing out all outside light.
    > Reflections will also mess up auto-focus.
    >
    > If it's like the ones I've shot at, you'll need a very fast ISO
    > setting, and will still have slow shutter speeds.
    >
    > There are 5 shots through glass into water tanks at the zoo here
    > <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/gallery/Zoo%204-Jan-2003/>.


    Another solution to the [probable] reflection problem is to close the
    door and turn off the lights. If that's not possible, a black cloth
    could serve as a hood over the photographer and camera; could be taped
    to the window. Almost retro, but it should work.

    --
    John McWilliams
    John McWilliams, Jul 24, 2004
    #11
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