Any thoughts on Kingston Memory Modules?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Jeff Strickland, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. I don't buy memory very often, and recently bought a pair of 512M chip sets
    for a computer that I cleaned up for my niece.

    Today, the machine came back to my house, and it would not start. It turns
    out that one of the memory modules had gone belly up. I pulled one module,
    and the same problem persisted. I pulled the second module and inserted the
    first, and the problem resolved itself. I then inserted the second module
    into the first slot (basically, I swapped the modules in the slots), and the
    machine still works.

    It occurs to me that the problem is perhaps dirty pins on the connector, and
    reseating the modules is all that was needed, but the modules were
    physically swapped from one slot to the other.

    My question is, is Kingston memory something I should avoid purchasing if I
    get the opportunity again some day?
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jun 12, 2008
    #1
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  2. It turns out that I can not simply swap the modules. One of them is bad.



    "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote in message
    news:xxd4k.15232$3j2.12590@trnddc03...
    >I don't buy memory very often, and recently bought a pair of 512M chip sets
    >for a computer that I cleaned up for my niece.
    >
    > Today, the machine came back to my house, and it would not start. It turns
    > out that one of the memory modules had gone belly up. I pulled one module,
    > and the same problem persisted. I pulled the second module and inserted
    > the first, and the problem resolved itself. I then inserted the second
    > module into the first slot (basically, I swapped the modules in the
    > slots), and the machine still works.
    >
    > It occurs to me that the problem is perhaps dirty pins on the connector,
    > and reseating the modules is all that was needed, but the modules were
    > physically swapped from one slot to the other.
    >
    > My question is, is Kingston memory something I should avoid purchasing if
    > I get the opportunity again some day?
    >
    >
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jun 12, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Jeff Strickland

    Baron Guest

    Jeff Strickland wrote:

    > I don't buy memory very often, and recently bought a pair of 512M chip
    > sets for a computer that I cleaned up for my niece.
    >
    > Today, the machine came back to my house, and it would not start. It
    > turns out that one of the memory modules had gone belly up. I pulled
    > one module, and the same problem persisted. I pulled the second module
    > and inserted the first, and the problem resolved itself. I then
    > inserted the second module into the first slot (basically, I swapped
    > the modules in the slots), and the machine still works.
    >
    > It occurs to me that the problem is perhaps dirty pins on the
    > connector, and reseating the modules is all that was needed, but the
    > modules were physically swapped from one slot to the other.
    >
    > My question is, is Kingston memory something I should avoid purchasing
    > if I get the opportunity again some day?


    Hi jeff,
    Get memtest "memtest.org" and run the tests with single modules first
    and run a single module in each slot. Its common for one slot to go
    bad with two modules installed. I have found that its nearly always
    bad caps in the memory psu.

    Kingston give a lifetime warranty and I don't hesitate to buy from
    them ! Yes I've an odd bad one, which they have replaced without
    question. Indeed knowing the sensitivity to static damage of memory
    modules, its even possible that I inadvertently damaged it !

    --
    Best Regards:
    Baron.
     
    Baron, Jun 12, 2008
    #3
  4. "Baron" <> wrote in message
    news:g2rvm3$6c5$...
    > Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >
    >> I don't buy memory very often, and recently bought a pair of 512M chip
    >> sets for a computer that I cleaned up for my niece.
    >>
    >> Today, the machine came back to my house, and it would not start. It
    >> turns out that one of the memory modules had gone belly up. I pulled
    >> one module, and the same problem persisted. I pulled the second module
    >> and inserted the first, and the problem resolved itself. I then
    >> inserted the second module into the first slot (basically, I swapped
    >> the modules in the slots), and the machine still works.
    >>
    >> It occurs to me that the problem is perhaps dirty pins on the
    >> connector, and reseating the modules is all that was needed, but the
    >> modules were physically swapped from one slot to the other.
    >>
    >> My question is, is Kingston memory something I should avoid purchasing
    >> if I get the opportunity again some day?

    >
    > Hi jeff,
    > Get memtest "memtest.org" and run the tests with single modules first
    > and run a single module in each slot. Its common for one slot to go
    > bad with two modules installed. I have found that its nearly always
    > bad caps in the memory psu.
    >
    > Kingston give a lifetime warranty and I don't hesitate to buy from
    > them ! Yes I've an odd bad one, which they have replaced without
    > question. Indeed knowing the sensitivity to static damage of memory
    > modules, its even possible that I inadvertently damaged it !
    >



    How do you exercise the warranty, and what is the term of it?

    I bought these memory modules less than 90 days ago, certainly less than 120
    days.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Jun 13, 2008
    #4
  5. Jeff Strickland

    Baron Guest

    Jeff Strickland Inscribed thus:

    >
    > "Baron" <> wrote in message
    > news:g2rvm3$6c5$...
    >> Jeff Strickland wrote:
    >>
    >>> I don't buy memory very often, and recently bought a pair of 512M
    >>> chip sets for a computer that I cleaned up for my niece.
    >>>
    >>> Today, the machine came back to my house, and it would not start. It
    >>> turns out that one of the memory modules had gone belly up. I pulled
    >>> one module, and the same problem persisted. I pulled the second
    >>> module and inserted the first, and the problem resolved itself. I
    >>> then inserted the second module into the first slot (basically, I
    >>> swapped the modules in the slots), and the machine still works.
    >>>
    >>> It occurs to me that the problem is perhaps dirty pins on the
    >>> connector, and reseating the modules is all that was needed, but the
    >>> modules were physically swapped from one slot to the other.
    >>>
    >>> My question is, is Kingston memory something I should avoid
    >>> purchasing if I get the opportunity again some day?

    >>
    >> Hi jeff,
    >> Get memtest "memtest.org" and run the tests with single modules first
    >> and run a single module in each slot. Its common for one slot to go
    >> bad with two modules installed. I have found that its nearly always
    >> bad caps in the memory psu.
    >>
    >> Kingston give a lifetime warranty and I don't hesitate to buy from
    >> them ! Yes I've an odd bad one, which they have replaced without
    >> question. Indeed knowing the sensitivity to static damage of memory
    >> modules, its even possible that I inadvertently damaged it !
    >>

    >
    >
    > How do you exercise the warranty, and what is the term of it?
    >
    > I bought these memory modules less than 90 days ago, certainly less
    > than 120 days.


    Good Morning Jeff, at least it is at the moment !

    Unless the terms are different in the USA, Kingston give a "Lifetime
    Warranty" ie five years on all their memory products as far as I am
    aware.

    All I have ever done is asked for an RMA authority and followed the
    instructions given. In every case I have received a replacement
    product within a few days.

    From your comments it may be YMMV ! Can you find the T & C on their
    website ?

    --
    Best Reagrds:
    Baron.
     
    Baron, Jun 13, 2008
    #5
  6. On Jun 12, 7:03 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote:
    > I don't buy memory very often, and recently bought a pair of 512M chip sets
    > for a computer that I cleaned up for my niece.
    >
    > Today, the machine came back to my house, and it would not start. It turns
    > out that one of the memory modules had gone belly up. I pulled one module,
    > and the same problem persisted. I pulled the second module and inserted the
    > first, and the problem resolved itself. I then inserted the second module
    > into the first slot (basically, I swapped the modules in the slots), and the
    > machine still works.
    >
    > It occurs to me that the problem is perhaps dirty pins on the connector, and
    > reseating the modules is all that was needed, but the modules were
    > physically swapped from one slot to the other.
    >
    > My question is, is Kingston memory something I should avoid purchasing if I
    > get the opportunity again some day?



    Kingston are a reputable company (along with the likes of Crucial).
    I've purchased memory from them in the past with no problems. Due to
    the manufacturing process, there's bound to be the odd stick that is a
    little faulty. as Baron said, they give a lifetime warrenty so you
    shouldn't have any problems returning it and getting a new memory
    stick sent out.

    They're by no means a fly-by-night or cow-boy operation :)
     
    Weyoun the Dancing Borg, Jun 17, 2008
    #6
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