Any software / cameras auto-orientate pictures?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Fred Finisterre, Sep 26, 2003.

  1. Hi,

    I find it a bit of a drag, having to rotate pics 90 degrees one way or the
    other on the screen to view them, when I've taken them by turning the camera
    on it's side.

    Are there any camera/software combinations that record how the camera was
    help when the pic was taken and auto-rotate it when transferred to the PC?

    Thanks,

    Fred.
     
    Fred Finisterre, Sep 26, 2003
    #1
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  2. Fred Finisterre

    jean Guest

    My Canon S400 shows the pics correctly on the little screen but I don't use
    any of Canon's software to transfer the images on my computer so they are
    always horizontal, I then use ROTA to rotate them without loss, easy, fast
    and free (
    http://www.ba.wakwak.com/~tsuruzoh/Computer/Soft/Rota/readme-e.html )

    Jean

    "Fred Finisterre" <> a écrit dans le message de
    news:bl039f$bph$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I find it a bit of a drag, having to rotate pics 90 degrees one way or the
    > other on the screen to view them, when I've taken them by turning the

    camera
    > on it's side.
    >
    > Are there any camera/software combinations that record how the camera was
    > help when the pic was taken and auto-rotate it when transferred to the PC?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Fred.
    >
    >
     
    jean, Sep 26, 2003
    #2
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  3. Fred Finisterre

    Lucas Tam Guest

    "Fred Finisterre" <> wrote in
    news:bl039f$bph$:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I find it a bit of a drag, having to rotate pics 90 degrees one way or
    > the other on the screen to view them, when I've taken them by turning
    > the camera on it's side.
    >
    > Are there any camera/software combinations that record how the camera
    > was help when the pic was taken and auto-rotate it when transferred to
    > the PC?


    ACDsee has an auto-rotate function - but it only works if your camera has
    an orientation sensor.

    Anyhow, you can lossless rotate most JPEGs...that way you don't need to
    rotate your pics every view, only once.


    --
    Lucas Tam ()
    Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
     
    Lucas Tam, Sep 26, 2003
    #3
  4. Fred Finisterre

    Janko Guest

    "Fred Finisterre" <> wrote in message news:<bl039f$bph$>...

    Your camera must have the orientation sensor. You than need a software
    that can do auto rotation based on exif data.

    Here is a (short) summary of the responses I got for my previous post:

    > > I am trying to find a software that would automatically rotate my
    > > JPEG photos by EXIF Orientation tag. The only solution I could
    > > find by now is Photoshop, but unfortunately it "forgets" some of
    > > the (probably non standard) fields. Other programs (like
    > > IrfanView) do rotate the image, but do not update the EXIF
    > > Orientation tag.

    > ACDSee has an auto rotate function... and it's a great graphics
    > viewer too!


    It has an auto rotate function and it can perform batch
    operations and "corrects" the EXIF Orientation flag.
    Unfortunately (like Photoshop) forgets some of the EXIF fields
    (Miscellaneous and Maker Note).

    > ... try IrfanView. It can do the same for free.


    IrfanView is an excellent viewer and does jpeg loss-less
    rotation, but not based on EXIF Orientation. When manually
    rotating images it saves all the EXIF fields, but does not update
    the Orientation.

    > exifautotran is an open source Unix script which does this:
    >
    > http://jpegclub.org/exif_orientation.html
    >
    > Note: It is important to use the Exif patched jpegtran version
    > for this to work (see Exif Patch Page). ABC-View is a Windows
    > application which uses this procedure:
    >
    > http://www.abc-view.com/articles/article5.html


    Actually ABC-View does this all. You can select multiple files
    and use the Rotate using EXIF flag command. It also preserves all
    EXIF information.

    Regards,

    Janko
     
    Janko, Sep 26, 2003
    #4
  5. "Fred Finisterre" <> writes:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I find it a bit of a drag, having to rotate pics 90 degrees one way or the
    > other on the screen to view them, when I've taken them by turning the camera
    > on it's side.
    >
    > Are there any camera/software combinations that record how the camera was
    > help when the pic was taken and auto-rotate it when transferred to the PC?


    Most of the newer Canons (at least in the prosumer and dslr categories) have a
    sensor that marks the orientation in the header, and the Canon software will
    automatically rotate the pictures. I think the newer Kodak cameras may have
    this also.

    My Olympus camera will allow me to rotate the pictures during review in the
    camera, and it will mark in the jpg header the orientation. I wrote a perl
    script that I use as part of my download sequence that calls jpegtran to rotate
    the pictures losslessly.

    --
    Michael Meissner
    email:
    http://www.the-meissners.org
     
    Michael Meissner, Sep 26, 2003
    #5
  6. Fred Finisterre

    Stewy Guest

    "Fred Finisterre" <> wrote in message
    news:bl039f$bph$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I find it a bit of a drag, having to rotate pics 90 degrees one way or the
    > other on the screen to view them, when I've taken them by turning the

    camera
    > on it's side.
    >
    > Are there any camera/software combinations that record how the camera was
    > help when the pic was taken and auto-rotate it when transferred to the PC?
    >

    The easiest solution would be to never take portrait oriented snaps.
     
    Stewy, Sep 27, 2003
    #6
  7. Fred Finisterre

    Ten Guest

    "jean" <look_for@my_email.org> wrote in message
    news:4GNcb.10731$...
    > My Canon S400 shows the pics correctly on the little screen but I don't

    use
    > any of Canon's software to transfer the images on my computer so they are
    > always horizontal, I then use ROTA to rotate them without loss, easy, fast
    > and free (


    I have a Canon Ixus V3 (230). I don't use the Canon software to download
    pics, I just use windows Explorer to copy the files from the camera. They
    all retain their camera selected orientation.

    Ten
     
    Ten, Sep 27, 2003
    #7
  8. Fred Finisterre

    JunkMonkey Guest

    My Canon G3 for sure does this. Canon G5 probably does this since there
    doesn't appear to be much difference between the 2.

    "Fred Finisterre" <> wrote in message
    news:bl039f$bph$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I find it a bit of a drag, having to rotate pics 90 degrees one way or the
    > other on the screen to view them, when I've taken them by turning the

    camera
    > on it's side.
    >
    > Are there any camera/software combinations that record how the camera was
    > help when the pic was taken and auto-rotate it when transferred to the PC?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Fred.
    >
    >
     
    JunkMonkey, Sep 27, 2003
    #8
  9. Fred Finisterre

    Barry Smith Guest

    In message <bl2voa$sjo$>
    "Stewy" <> wrote:

    >
    > "Fred Finisterre" <> wrote in message
    > news:bl039f$bph$...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I find it a bit of a drag, having to rotate pics 90 degrees one way or the
    > > other on the screen to view them, when I've taken them by turning the

    > camera
    > > on it's side.
    > >
    > > Are there any camera/software combinations that record how the camera was
    > > help when the pic was taken and auto-rotate it when transferred to the PC?
    > >

    > The easiest solution would be to never take portrait oriented snaps.


    Why aren't photo images (normally) square ? Obviously nothing
    to do with the lens. What was the reason for going to rectangular ?

    Barry
    --
    Yesterday is but today's memories, tomorrow is but today's dreams.
     
    Barry Smith, Sep 27, 2003
    #9
  10. The word is "oriented". There is no such word as 'orientate'.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Sep 28, 2003
    #10
  11. Fred Finisterre

    JunkMonkey Guest

    good question!

    Just speculating here, but paintings for the most part came in "portrait" or
    "landscape" mode. If you read up on the history of photography, you will
    find in the earliest years of photography that comparisons were constantly
    being made to painting, especially portrait painting. Following conventions
    of painting, I'm sure, lent an air of legitimacy to this new art form, and
    it has trickled down to current times. Human nature and all

    OTOH the success of medium format film cameras in the "serious" photo ranks
    has created quite a few photographers who like to work in the square mode.
    I'm one of 'em.(well, I'm serious, just not any good) Please bear in mind
    that because your camera has a rectangular image format, there is no reason
    to restrain yourself to the native format of your camera.

    If you've got any photos lying about that just don't reflect what you
    thought you saw when you shot it, try cropping it to a square, you might
    find what it is you though you saw in the first place. (save the original
    image, so you can try different versions!)


    "Barry Smith" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In message <bl2voa$sjo$>
    > "Stewy" <> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "Fred Finisterre" <> wrote in message
    > > news:bl039f$bph$...
    > > > Hi,
    > > >
    > > > I find it a bit of a drag, having to rotate pics 90 degrees one way or

    the
    > > > other on the screen to view them, when I've taken them by turning the

    > > camera
    > > > on it's side.
    > > >
    > > > Are there any camera/software combinations that record how the camera

    was
    > > > help when the pic was taken and auto-rotate it when transferred to the

    PC?
    > > >

    > > The easiest solution would be to never take portrait oriented snaps.

    >
    > Why aren't photo images (normally) square ? Obviously nothing
    > to do with the lens. What was the reason for going to rectangular ?
    >
    > Barry
    > --
    > Yesterday is but today's memories, tomorrow is but today's dreams.
     
    JunkMonkey, Sep 28, 2003
    #11
  12. Fred Finisterre

    Barry Smith Guest

    Re: good question!

    In message <KSAdb.171697$>
    "JunkMonkey" <> wrote:

    > Just speculating here, but paintings for the most part came in "portrait" or
    > "landscape" mode. If you read up on the history of photography, you will
    > find in the earliest years of photography that comparisons were constantly
    > being made to painting, especially portrait painting. Following conventions
    > of painting, I'm sure, lent an air of legitimacy to this new art form, and
    > it has trickled down to current times. Human nature and all


    That makes sense.

    > OTOH the success of medium format film cameras in the "serious" photo ranks
    > has created quite a few photographers who like to work in the square mode.


    My father used a twin lens reflex for some time and I have the negatives
    which I plan to scan.

    > I'm one of 'em.(well, I'm serious, just not any good) Please bear in mind
    > that because your camera has a rectangular image format, there is no reason
    > to restrain yourself to the native format of your camera.
    >
    > If you've got any photos lying about that just don't reflect what you
    > thought you saw when you shot it, try cropping it to a square, you might
    > find what it is you though you saw in the first place. (save the original
    > image, so you can try different versions!)


    Good idea. Thanks.

    Barry
    --
    Bill Gates is a jerk. Rich maybe, but still a jerk.
     
    Barry Smith, Sep 28, 2003
    #12
  13. > The word is "oriented". There is no such word as 'orientate'.

    Wrong! There is such a word. Suggest you pay a visit to dictionary.com and
    look it up!

    Fred.
     
    Fred Finisterre, Sep 28, 2003
    #13
  14. Fred Finisterre

    Martin Guest

    "Fred Finisterre" <> wrote in message
    news:bl039f$bph$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I find it a bit of a drag, having to rotate pics 90 degrees one way or the
    > other on the screen to view them, when I've taken them by turning the

    camera
    > on it's side.
    >
    > Are there any camera/software combinations that record how the camera was
    > help when the pic was taken and auto-rotate it when transferred to the PC?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Fred.
    >
    >


    Many recent Canons do...

    Martin
     
    Martin, Sep 30, 2003
    #14
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