Any simple pdf Editor software for business?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by lbbss, Nov 18, 2008.

  1. lbbss

    lbbss Guest

    I am looking for a pdf editor that is free for busyness use, I don't
    know if there is such a thing. Our company does not think this is
    necessary for our job, but I would like to use one at work. I found
    one called PDF-XChange Viewer. I emailed them with a question if it
    is free for business use, but they will not respond. Any ideas?
    thanks.
     
    lbbss, Nov 18, 2008
    #1
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  2. lbbss

    Desk Rabbit Guest

    lbbss wrote:
    > I am looking for a pdf editor that is free for busyness use, I don't
    > know if there is such a thing. Our company does not think this is
    > necessary for our job, but I would like to use one at work. I found
    > one called PDF-XChange Viewer. I emailed them with a question if it
    > is free for business use, but they will not respond. Any ideas?
    > thanks.

    About 2 seconds looking at the web site reveals that the only free
    version is a viewer only.

    You need to make a case to your manager as to why you need to edit PDF
    and how this is going to make you more productive and make more money
    for the company. Given that, any manager with half a brain could see the
    benefit and get the software you need. If you can't make that case then
    you don't need it.
     
    Desk Rabbit, Nov 18, 2008
    #2
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  3. lbbss

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2008-11-18, Desk Rabbit <> wrote:
    > lbbss wrote:
    >> I am looking for a pdf editor that is free for busyness use, I don't
    >> know if there is such a thing. Our company does not think this is
    >> necessary for our job, but I would like to use one at work. I found
    >> one called PDF-XChange Viewer. I emailed them with a question if it
    >> is free for business use, but they will not respond. Any ideas?
    >> thanks.

    >
    > About 2 seconds looking at the web site reveals that the only free
    > version is a viewer only.
    >
    > You need to make a case to your manager as to why you need to edit PDF
    > and how this is going to make you more productive and make more money
    > for the company. Given that, any manager with half a brain could see the
    > benefit and get the software you need. If you can't make that case then
    > you don't need it.


    One of the useful features of a PDF document is that it can't easily be
    altered; it isn't a means of co-authoring something, it's a finished
    product - like a printed document. During the production stage of the
    document, use text editors or word processors or image processors or
    'desk-top publishing suites' or whatever gives the results required. Then
    if a PDF is required as the final product, ask whoever maintains the
    production software you use to provide a means of 'exporting' or 'printing
    to' or 'saving as' PDF.

    I agree with Desk Rabbit; if you can't put a business case for using PDF
    then you don't need it.

    One excellent business case is for sending pamphlets or brochures or
    price-lists as attachments to emails sent to your customers; everyone with
    a modern computer system can read and print PDF files, regardless of their
    hardware specification or operating system. But you can't rely on them
    having the same 'word processor' or 'presentation manager' as your company
    happens to use, so sending 'word processor' or 'presentation manager' files
    is not a reliable way of communicating - even if the recipients can read
    your document, they may well not see it looking the way it looks to you.
    (And an HTML file almost certainly won't look the same!)

    There is also a danger that customers might be able to see 'hidden' or
    'previous versions' parts of your word processor files, or 'meta
    information' about who contributed what to the document and where content
    came from, which could reveal sensitive 'commercial' information - a PDF
    shouldn't have any of that in it.

    If you send a word processor file or a spreadsheet file to someone, there
    is nothing to stop them from accidentally or deliberately altering it and
    then using the altered version to make it look as though you told them
    something different from what was intended. That could be very awkward in
    a commercial or legal negotiation. A PDF file that can't be edited is a
    much less risky way of communicating.

    A PDF file looks a lot more professional than a word processor file.

    OpenOffice.org can 'export' files as PDF documents, which can be read or
    printed by anyone with a PDF reader program.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Nov 18, 2008
    #3
  4. lbbss

    VanguardLH Guest

    lbbss wrote:

    > I am looking for a pdf editor that is free for busyness use, I don't
    > know if there is such a thing. Our company does not think this is
    > necessary for our job, but I would like to use one at work. I found
    > one called PDF-XChange Viewer. I emailed them with a question if it
    > is free for business use, but they will not respond. Any ideas?
    > thanks.


    http://www.docu-track.com/home/prod_user/PDF-XChange_Tools/pdfx_viewer

    Says right on that page who can use the free version. Although called a
    viewer, it will let you add comments, annotations, mark-up, extract
    text, etc. However, it isn't a replacement for a full-blown version of
    Acrobat if you are looking to publish documents for your company but
    rather as a personal or lite edition that lets you do some more than the
    Adobe Reader can do.

    Maybe you didn't get a response because you didn't follow their
    instructions on how to circumvent their spam filter. It says at
    http://www.docu-track.com/support, "We have aggressive spam filters in
    place - ensuring you mention one of our products in the 'Subject' field
    of your email, our spam filter will treat your email as genuine -
    otherwise it is very very likely to be deleted."
     
    VanguardLH, Nov 18, 2008
    #4
  5. lbbss

    Walter Guest

    Tanel Kagan wrote:

    > "lbbss" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I am looking for a pdf editor that is free for busyness use, I don't
    >> know if there is such a thing. Our company does not think this is
    >> necessary for our job, but I would like to use one at work. I found
    >> one called PDF-XChange Viewer. I emailed them with a question if it
    >> is free for business use, but they will not respond. Any ideas?
    >> thanks.

    >
    > Just to chuck in my 2 pence worth and echo what some of the other
    > posters have said, I find that editing PDFs is a real pain in any
    > case. When it comes to editing text, you can usually only do it one
    > line at a time and you then have to worry about losing justification
    > and things like that. As for editing images, I've never even tried
    > it and I suspect Acrobat will simply launch your default image editor
    > if you did try.
    > The point is, there are dozens of other types of programs designed
    > specifically for the job that they seek to do. If you're editing
    > text, a word processor is the best and most flexible. If you're
    > editing images, an image editor. If it's a vector based drawing, a
    > CAD package, and so on.
    > The idea behind PDF is to produce a final document that anyone can
    > view.


    Huh? Anyone willing to download additional software you mean? Correct me
    if I'm wrong, but isn't .pdf a propriatary file format? In other words,
    it's not associated with any OS.

    I run WinXP, and it cannot render .pdf natively.

    On the rare occasion I need to look at a .pdf file I use Foxit Reader. It's
    free, and a helluva lot smaller than that bloatware Adobe offers. You can
    edit .pdf files with it as well. Only "problem" is the free version places
    an 'evaluation stamp' on any pages you make changes to. Other than that it
    works just fine for editing and printing.

    > It's basically paperless printing, but in the same way that you
    > would struggle to change the words on a printed piece of paper,
    > changing the contents of a PDF is (intentionally) made difficult. As
    > some others have said, you don't want to send a customer a quote
    > which is then altered by the customer resulting in a dispute over who
    > agreed what.
    > And, as others have said, if notwithstanding all these point there is
    > still a strong business argument for having a PDF editor, then your
    > boss is going to have to make a commercial decision.
    >
    > If the answer is still "no" then you can at the very least sleep easy
    > knowing that your business acumen and technical expertise is better
    > than that of your employers!
    >
    > Tanel.
     
    Walter, Nov 18, 2008
    #5
  6. lbbss

    Walter Guest

    Tanel Kagan wrote:

    >> Huh? Anyone willing to download additional software you mean? Correct me
    >> if I'm wrong, but isn't .pdf a propriatary file format? In other words,
    >> it's not associated with any OS.
    >>
    >> I run WinXP, and it cannot render .pdf natively.
    >>
    >> On the rare occasion I need to look at a .pdf file I use Foxit
    >> Reader. It's free, and a helluva lot smaller than that bloatware
    >> Adobe offers. You can edit .pdf files with it as well. Only
    >> "problem" is the free version places an 'evaluation stamp' on any
    >> pages you make changes to. Other than that it works just fine for
    >> editing and printing.

    >
    > But you still had to download Foxit Reader...


    Of course. What's your point?

    You snipped out this, which YOU wrote:

    <quote> The idea behind PDF is to produce a final document that anyone can
    view </quote>

    "Anyone" can view ANY file type with the proper tool.

    My point is that not just "anyone" can view .pdf unless they are willing to
    download and install additional software. A .pdf file is not "native" to
    any (that I am aware of), let alone ALL OS, like say .html or .txt is.

    Send "anyone" a .txt or .html document, and no matter WHAT OS they run,
    they'll be able to view/modify it without taking another step.

    Try that with a .pdf file.

    I have no idea how or why .pdf ever became popular. What can you do with it
    that you can't do with HTML? Is it virus-proof or something?
     
    Walter, Nov 18, 2008
    #6
  7. lbbss

    Walter Guest

    Mike Easter wrote:

    > Walter wrote:
    >
    >> I have no idea how or why .pdf ever became popular. What can you do
    >> with it that you can't do with HTML? Is it virus-proof or something?

    >
    > .pdf is an excellent device output format, eg to screen or printer.
    > It is scalable.


    So is HTML.

    > For editing files with graphics and fonts and other text effects, some
    > kind of open document format would be better, such as .odf.


    Or HTML

    > .html has advantages and disadvantages compared to .pdf and .odf.
    > .html isn't scalable.


    Sure it is.

    > For email which includes recipients whose email .html rendering
    > configuration and capabilities are unknown or uncertain, plaintext is
    > best.


    Goes without saying, but nobody's talking about email.

    > Whenever you are preparing to show someone else a 'document' whether
    > it is text, graphics, or some combination, you should be considering
    > how they are going to be rendering it -- to screen, to printer, with
    > what application/OS/hardware or if that is unknown.


    No argument there. All I said was HTML is free, easy to edit and viewable
    across the board regardless of the OS. And despite your comment to the
    contrary, is scalable if you know all that you're working with. OTOH,
    Adobe Acrobat costs like 500 bucks, is propriatary and nowhere near worth
    the price. IMO.

    And getting back on topic, I still say Foxit reader is the best I've seen
    for "free" viewing/editing of .pdf files. And if you like it, it's only 99
    bucks to register and remove the "evaluation" stamp from edited .pdf pages.
    That's a far cry from the 500 Adobe wants to do (basically) the same things.
     
    Walter, Nov 18, 2008
    #7
  8. lbbss

    Jordon Guest

    Tanel Kagan wrote:
    > So I don't see how we can really level any criticism at Adobe
    > for creating a fantastic product


    I can. Have you used any of the last three versions
    of the Acrobat Reader? It's huge. It's slow. It
    takes forever to download and forever to install.
    And when it updates itself, it requires a reboot.

    No thank you. There's too many other readers out
    there that do a better job.

    --
    Jordon
     
    Jordon, Nov 18, 2008
    #8
  9. lbbss

    Walter Guest

    Jordon wrote:

    > Tanel Kagan wrote:


    >> So I don't see how we can really level any criticism at Adobe
    >> for creating a fantastic product

    >
    > I can. Have you used any of the last three versions
    > of the Acrobat Reader? It's huge. It's slow. It
    > takes forever to download and forever to install.
    > And when it updates itself, it requires a reboot.


    Yup. Foxit reader = 4MB (installed)
    Acrobat reader = 25MB (packed)

    Foxit does everything Adobe does, plus a little more.

    > No thank you. There's too many other readers out
    > there that do a better job.
     
    Walter, Nov 18, 2008
    #9
  10. lbbss

    M.L. Guest


    > All I said was HTML is free, easy to edit and viewable
    >across the board regardless of the OS.


    HTML is not easy for the uninitiated to edit. More important, HTML
    documents are not as easy to create as pdf documents.
     
    M.L., Nov 18, 2008
    #10
  11. lbbss

    chuckcar Guest

    lbbss <> wrote in
    news::

    > I am looking for a pdf editor that is free for busyness use, I don't
    > know if there is such a thing. Our company does not think this is
    > necessary for our job, but I would like to use one at work. I found
    > one called PDF-XChange Viewer. I emailed them with a question if it
    > is free for business use, but they will not respond. Any ideas?
    > thanks.
    >

    PDF if Adobe's way of grabbing money from The laser printer market and not
    paying money to use postscript. Postscript is a text formatting language
    like HTML or RTF that allows inclusion of pictures. Something that any
    modern word processor will also do. You *best* solution is to use a word
    processor that allows embedded graphics but doesn't do macros. That way
    you can't have viri/trojans at all. PDF is *owned* by Adobe so any free
    program that handles it is going to around just long enough for Adobe
    to take to court.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Nov 18, 2008
    #11
  12. lbbss

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 22:52:23 +0000 (UTC), chuckcar <>
    wrote:

    >PDF is *owned* by Adobe so any free program that handles it is going to around just long enough for Adobe
    >to take to court.


    Hoooolllyyy crap.

    Someone please reply to this so chucktard can see how big of an idiot
    he is.

    Please ignore chucktard. He's known around here to be clueless.

    PDF is an Open Standard.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PDF

    http://www.linux-watch.com/news/NS7542722606.html

    http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070129-8724.html

    Even staright from the horses mouth:

    http://www.adobe.com/pdf/release_pdf_faq.html

    --
    To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
     
    Evan Platt, Nov 18, 2008
    #12
  13. Evan Platt wrote:

    > chuckcar <> wrote:
    >> PDF is *owned* by Adobe so any free program that handles it is going
    >> to around just long enough for Adobe to take to court.

    >
    > Hoooolllyyy crap.
    >
    > Someone please reply to this so chucktard can see how big of an idiot
    > he is.
    >
    > Please ignore chucktard. He's known around here to be clueless.
    >
    > PDF is an Open Standard.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PDF
    >
    > http://www.linux-watch.com/news/NS7542722606.html
    >
    > http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070129-8724.html
    >
    > Even staright from the horses mouth:
    >
    > http://www.adobe.com/pdf/release_pdf_faq.html


    <lol> And I never knew that, "Postscript is a text formatting language
    like HTML"

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Nov 19, 2008
    #13
  14. lbbss

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 19:32:17 -0500, "Beauregard T. Shagnasty"
    <> wrote:

    ><lol> And I never knew that, "Postscript is a text formatting language
    >like HTML"


    Oh I overlooked that one too.. What was his other gem, "RTF is like a
    word processor" or something?
    --
    To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
     
    Evan Platt, Nov 19, 2008
    #14
  15. lbbss

    chuckcar Guest

    "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in
    news:gfvmqh$h5d$:

    > <lol> And I never knew that, "Postscript is a text formatting language
    > like HTML"
    >

    Don't quote that idiot. His use here is below notice.

    Of course postscript is a language. How did you think it worked?

    http://www.linuxfocus.org/English/May1998/article43.html

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Nov 19, 2008
    #15
  16. chuckcar wrote:

    > "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" wrote:
    >
    >> <lol> And I never knew that, "Postscript is a text formatting
    >> language like HTML"
    >>

    > Don't quote that idiot. His use here is below notice.


    I thought it was cute.

    > Of course postscript is a language. How did you think it worked?


    "like HTML" ?

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Nov 19, 2008
    #16
  17. lbbss

    chuckcar Guest

    "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in
    news:gfvtea$6jm$:

    > chuckcar wrote:
    >
    >> "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" wrote:
    >>
    >>> <lol> And I never knew that, "Postscript is a text formatting
    >>> language like HTML"
    >>>

    >> Don't quote that idiot. His use here is below notice.

    >
    > I thought it was cute.
    >
    >> Of course postscript is a language. How did you think it worked?

    >
    > "like HTML" ?
    >

    No. HTML is just text formatting and placement of external objects.
    Postscript includes things such as line drawing and shading which pretty
    well requires an actual language. Think of how you would describe a
    picture.


    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Nov 19, 2008
    #17
  18. lbbss

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 01:57:25 +0000 (UTC), chuckcar <>
    wrote:

    >Don't quote that idiot. His use here is below notice.


    Wait - YOU'RE the one who said Adobe owns PDF, I proved you wrong, and
    I'M the idiot?

    My God.. You are truly a clueless moron.

    No seriously.. I don't say that about many people.. But you are truly
    stupid.
    --
    To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
     
    Evan Platt, Nov 19, 2008
    #18
  19. lbbss

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 21:25:14 -0500, "Beauregard T. Shagnasty"
    <> wrote:

    >I thought it was cute.


    Crap, there's the problem. Chucktard doesn't think. You solved it!

    >"like HTML" ?


    LOL.. Just like RTF is like a word processor, and you can't have
    hibernate and standby on a machine, and you can't have Standby on a
    Desktop.

    What's sad is he doesn't realize how much of an idiot he is, and when
    I proved him being wrong on almost every post of his, he killfiled me.

    I think him and Wereo Scotty are about the same intellectually.
    --
    To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
     
    Evan Platt, Nov 19, 2008
    #19
  20. chuckcar wrote:

    > "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" wrote:
    >> chuckcar wrote:
    >>> "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" wrote:
    >>>> <lol> And I never knew that, "Postscript is a text formatting
    >>>> language like HTML"
    >>>>
    >>> Don't quote that idiot. His use here is below notice.

    >>
    >> I thought it was cute.
    >>
    >>> Of course postscript is a language. How did you think it worked?

    >>
    >> "like HTML" ?
    >>

    > No. HTML is just text formatting and placement of external objects.
    > Postscript includes things such as line drawing and shading which
    > pretty well requires an actual language. Think of how you would
    > describe a picture.


    Heh, you wrote that like you thought I don't know the difference.

    There is little similarity between Postscript and HTML.

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Nov 19, 2008
    #20
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