Any better way to assign a path

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by MZB, May 23, 2007.

  1. MZB

    MZB Guest

    Howdy. I have a Dell Inspiron with XP HOME.

    There is a directory I use a lot.

    Say it is: c:\msworks\documents\type\odd\whatever

    Anyway, in order to make it easier to get to that folder, I used the DOS
    command
    SUBST g: c:\msworks\documents\type\odd\whatever

    I then put it in a batch file and put a shortcut to this file in my startup
    menu so that it runs this every time I boot up.

    Is this the best, most efficient way to do that?

    Is there any other way to ASSIGN the letter g (or whatever) to that path so
    that I do it once and it is set that way? (Of course that might not be any
    more efficient).

    Mel
     
    MZB, May 23, 2007
    #1
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  2. MZB

    why? Guest

    On Wed, 23 May 2007 10:43:01 -0400, MZB wrote:

    >Howdy. I have a Dell Inspiron with XP HOME.
    >
    >There is a directory I use a lot.
    >
    >Say it is: c:\msworks\documents\type\odd\whatever
    >
    >Anyway, in order to make it easier to get to that folder, I used the DOS
    >command
    >SUBST g: c:\msworks\documents\type\odd\whatever


    Does it need to be G?

    >I then put it in a batch file and put a shortcut to this file in my startup
    >menu so that it runs this every time I boot up.
    >
    >Is this the best, most efficient way to do that?
    >
    >Is there any other way to ASSIGN the letter g (or whatever) to that path so
    >that I do it once and it is set that way? (Of course that might not be any
    >more efficient).


    With out the need for G, then simply creating a shortcut to the folder
    and putting the shortcut in startup will do.

    If it must be G then subst or add / create a new partition, less simeple
    than subst. Or you repoint the My Documents properties to the path you
    want, this won't give you G but it makes My Documents icon point to your
    path.

    >Mel


    Me
     
    why?, May 23, 2007
    #2
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  3. MZB

    WhzzKdd Guest

    "why?" <fgrirp*sgc@VAINY!Qznq.fpvragvfg.pbz> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On Wed, 23 May 2007 10:43:01 -0400, MZB wrote:
    >
    >>Howdy. I have a Dell Inspiron with XP HOME.
    >>
    >>There is a directory I use a lot.
    >>
    >>Say it is: c:\msworks\documents\type\odd\whatever
    >>
    >>Anyway, in order to make it easier to get to that folder, I used the DOS
    >>command
    >>SUBST g: c:\msworks\documents\type\odd\whatever

    >
    > Does it need to be G?
    >
    >>I then put it in a batch file and put a shortcut to this file in my
    >>startup
    >>menu so that it runs this every time I boot up.
    >>
    >>Is this the best, most efficient way to do that?
    >>
    >>Is there any other way to ASSIGN the letter g (or whatever) to that path
    >>so
    >>that I do it once and it is set that way? (Of course that might not be any
    >>more efficient).

    >
    > With out the need for G, then simply creating a shortcut to the folder
    > and putting the shortcut in startup will do.
    >

    An easy way to do this, is in Windows Explorer, right-click the folder, and
    select "Send to", then Desktop (which creates the shortcut). Then drag the
    new icon to Start, then All Programs, and when the programs list pops up,
    drag it to the Startup folder and drop it there.
     
    WhzzKdd, May 23, 2007
    #3
  4. MZB

    Guest

    "MZB" <> wrote:

    >Howdy. I have a Dell Inspiron with XP HOME.
    >
    >There is a directory I use a lot.
    >
    >Say it is: c:\msworks\documents\type\odd\whatever
    >
    >Anyway, in order to make it easier to get to that folder, I used the DOS
    >command
    >SUBST g: c:\msworks\documents\type\odd\whatever
    >
    >I then put it in a batch file and put a shortcut to this file in my startup
    >menu so that it runs this every time I boot up.


    Pry as good as any other way, I'd forgotten about the SUBST command,
    gave up when the ASSIGN command disappeared.

    Besides what others have posted you can use the SET command and set a
    environment variable. The only thing this skips is putting a bat file
    in the startup dir.

    Variables you can change and how to do it
    http://vlaurie.com/computers2/Articles/environment.htm

    Why mention'd making a short-cut to the dir, this allows you to also
    use keyboard shortcuts to access the dir (ie:CTL-DEL-D, properties of
    the shortcut)
    --

    Someone set the midwest on fire and then blew it out.
    http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=152869566&size=o
     
    , May 23, 2007
    #4
  5. MZB

    Guest

    , May 23, 2007
    #5
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