antistatic/carsickness prevention a myth

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Troy Piggins, Aug 21, 2005.

  1. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    My girlfriend gets carsick. She heard those rubber strips that hang
    from underside of car and touch the road help stop carsickness. I had
    also heard about that, and that it had something to do with getting rid
    of static in the car.

    Is that correct? How does it work?

    Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    road.

    --
    Troy Piggins
    (playing with disposable email addresses
    and message IDs to minimise spam)
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. On 21 Aug 2005 05:47:02 GMT, Troy Piggins <> wrote:



    >Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    >the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    >road.

    The " theory" is to ground or "earth" the car. rubber straps will not do
    it (and neither will the tires)

    It does work in some instances.. not all. The straps must be conductive.

    I have even seen small chains used.

    By the way is this not a bit off topic?
     
    Malcolm William Mason, Aug 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. Troy Piggins

    Voltardo Guest

    Troy Piggins wrote:

    > My girlfriend gets carsick. She heard those rubber strips that hang
    > from underside of car and touch the road help stop carsickness. I had
    > also heard about that, and that it had something to do with getting rid
    > of static in the car.
    >
    > Is that correct? How does it work?
    >
    > Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    > the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    > road.
    >

    Remember fender skirts, curb feelers? How about Continental kits, baby
    moons or furry dice th hang on the mirror? To research your question,
    burn orange candles in your house...supposed to keep elephants out.
     
    Voltardo, Aug 21, 2005
    #3
  4. Troy Piggins

    gangle Guest

    "Troy Piggins" wrote
    > My girlfriend gets carsick. She heard those rubber strips that hang
    > from underside of car and touch the road help stop carsickness. I had
    > also heard about that, and that it had something to do with getting rid
    > of static in the car.
    >
    > Is that correct? How does it work?
    >
    > Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    > the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    > road.


    The tires actually act as insulation from the road surface because
    of the amount, shape, and thickness of the rubber, along
    with the poor contact made to the car's frame (tires don't make much
    contact with the wheels -- there's more compressed air touching
    wheels than there is rubber). That's why if a power line were to
    fall on the car, the tires would insulate you from the ground -- it
    would only be dangerous if you got out and stepped on the road
    to then ground yourself and complete the circuit. The strips you
    are talking about are flat to create friction, and have a metal
    connection to the car frame; when they *scrape* (not role across)
    the road, they, moment to moment, equalize the changing
    electrical potential of the moving car (and its occupants) with
    regard to the potential of the road.

    Here's a site I found that sells such strips where you can read an
    explanation of the static electricity/motion sickness thing:
    http://stopzap.com/.
     
    gangle, Aug 21, 2005
    #4
  5. Troy Piggins

    gangle Guest

    "Malcolm William Mason" wrote
    > On 21 Aug 2005 05:47:02 GMT, Troy Piggins wrote:
    >
    > >Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    > >the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    > >road.

    > The " theory" is to ground or "earth" the car. rubber straps will not do
    > it (and neither will the tires)
    >
    > It does work in some instances.. not all. The straps must be conductive.
    >
    > I have even seen small chains used.
    >
    > By the way is this not a bit off topic?


    No, it's NOT off topic. Rx = More lurking/Less assuming.
     
    gangle, Aug 21, 2005
    #5
  6. Troy Piggins

    Voltardo Guest

    Malcolm William Mason wrote:

    > On 21 Aug 2005 05:47:02 GMT, Troy Piggins <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    >>the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    >>road.

    >
    > The " theory" is to ground or "earth" the car. rubber straps will not do
    > it (and neither will the tires)
    >
    > It does work in some instances.. not all. The straps must be conductive.
    >
    > I have even seen small chains used.
    >
    > By the way is this not a bit off topic?


    Nothing is off topic in this newsgroup, nothing. (Second timr for emphasis.)
     
    Voltardo, Aug 21, 2005
    #6
  7. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    * gangle wrote:
    > "Troy Piggins" wrote
    >> My girlfriend gets carsick. She heard those rubber strips that hang
    >> from underside of car and touch the road help stop carsickness. I had
    >> also heard about that, and that it had something to do with getting rid
    >> of static in the car.
    >>
    >> Is that correct? How does it work?
    >>
    >> Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    >> the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    >> road.

    >
    > The tires actually act as insulation from the road surface because
    > of the amount, shape, and thickness of the rubber, along
    > with the poor contact made to the car's frame (tires don't make much
    > contact with the wheels -- there's more compressed air touching
    > wheels than there is rubber). That's why if a power line were to
    > fall on the car, the tires would insulate you from the ground -- it
    > would only be dangerous if you got out and stepped on the road
    > to then ground yourself and complete the circuit. The strips you
    > are talking about are flat to create friction, and have a metal
    > connection to the car frame; when they *scrape* (not role across)
    > the road, they, moment to moment, equalize the changing
    > electrical potential of the moving car (and its occupants) with
    > regard to the potential of the road.
    >
    > Here's a site I found that sells such strips where you can read an
    > explanation of the static electricity/motion sickness thing:
    > http://stopzap.com/.


    Aah, so they are not rubber - they are conductors. That explains it.
    All these years I assumed they were rubber.

    --
    Troy Piggins
    (playing with disposable email addresses
    and message IDs to minimise spam)
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 21, 2005
    #7
  8. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    * Malcolm William Mason wrote:
    > On 21 Aug 2005 05:47:02 GMT, Troy Piggins <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    >>the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    >>road.

    > The " theory" is to ground or "earth" the car. rubber straps will not
    > do it (and neither will the tires)
    >
    > It does work in some instances.. not all. The straps must be
    > conductive.
    >
    > I have even seen small chains used.


    Yeah, just realised they are conductors not insulators. Dunno why I
    always assumed they were rubber.

    > By the way is this not a bit off topic?


    Depends what the topic is. I started the topic so I guess it's not.

    Nothing to say this group is only computer related. Read some of the
    other posts - fishing tips, sick dogs, where are my socks/glasses lol.
    None of it is off-topic.

    --
    Troy Piggins
    (playing with disposable email addresses
    and message IDs to minimise spam)
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 21, 2005
    #8
  9. Troy Piggins

    Plato Guest

    Voltardo wrote:
    >
    > Remember fender skirts, curb feelers? How about Continental kits, baby
    > moons or furry dice th hang on the mirror? To research your question,
    > burn orange candles in your house...supposed to keep elephants out.


    The curb feelers were really odd.






    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Plato, Aug 21, 2005
    #9
  10. Voltardo wrote:

    > Remember fender skirts, curb feelers? How about Continental kits, baby
    > moons or furry dice th hang on the mirror? To research your question,


    Fake Buick port holes. Nonfunctional lakes pipes. J.C.Whitney.


    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263

    Killing All Posts from GG: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    End Of The Good GG Archive GUI: http://blinkynet.net/comp/gggui.html
     
    Blinky the Shark, Aug 21, 2005
    #10
  11. Plato wrote:
    > Voltardo wrote:
    >>
    >> Remember fender skirts, curb feelers? How about Continental kits, baby
    >> moons or furry dice th hang on the mirror? To research your question,
    >> burn orange candles in your house...supposed to keep elephants out.

    >
    > The curb feelers were really odd.


    I think you can still see them on the occasional low rider.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263

    Killing All Posts from GG: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    End Of The Good GG Archive GUI: http://blinkynet.net/comp/gggui.html
     
    Blinky the Shark, Aug 21, 2005
    #11
  12. Troy Piggins wrote:

    > My girlfriend gets carsick. She heard those rubber strips that hang
    > from underside of car and touch the road help stop carsickness. I had
    > also heard about that, and that it had something to do with getting rid
    > of static in the car.
    >
    > Is that correct? How does it work?


    Metal or rubber, it sounds like Bad Science to me. Don't waste your
    money on it. If they work for some people, you can just about bet it's
    a psychological effect and the problem was psycholical in the first
    place.

    > Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    > the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    > road.


    Metal or rubber, the difference is the money you waste on them.


    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263

    Killing All Posts from GG: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    End Of The Good GG Archive GUI: http://blinkynet.net/comp/gggui.html
     
    Blinky the Shark, Aug 21, 2005
    #12
  13. Troy Piggins

    fevi Guest

    Voltardo wrote:

    > Troy Piggins wrote:


    >>

    > Remember fender skirts, curb feelers? How about Continental kits, baby
    > moons or furry dice th hang on the mirror? To research your question,
    > burn orange candles in your house...supposed to keep elephants out.


    Sorry this showed up twice...something happened...
     
    fevi, Aug 21, 2005
    #13
  14. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    * Blinky the Shark wrote:
    > Troy Piggins wrote:
    >
    >> My girlfriend gets carsick. She heard those rubber strips that hang
    >> from underside of car and touch the road help stop carsickness. I had
    >> also heard about that, and that it had something to do with getting rid
    >> of static in the car.
    >>
    >> Is that correct? How does it work?

    >
    > Metal or rubber, it sounds like Bad Science to me. Don't waste your
    > money on it. If they work for some people, you can just about bet it's
    > a psychological effect and the problem was psycholical in the first
    > place.
    >
    >> Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    >> the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    >> road.

    >
    > Metal or rubber, the difference is the money you waste on them.


    Placebo effect, eh? Probably.

    --
    Troy Piggins
    (playing with disposable email addresses
    and message IDs to minimise spam)
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 21, 2005
    #14
  15. "Troy Piggins" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Placebo effect, eh? Probably.


    Dumbass effect if you aske me. Car sickness is caused by one thing; the
    motion of the car affects the inner ear, which in turn causes car sickness.
    Period.
     
    Captain America, Aug 21, 2005
    #15
  16. Troy Piggins

    Mike Easter Guest

    Captain America wrote:
    > "Troy Piggins"


    >> Placebo effect, eh? Probably.

    >
    > Dumbass effect if you aske me. Car sickness is caused by one thing;
    > the motion of the car affects the inner ear, which in turn causes car
    > sickness. Period.


    I'm not a believer or proponent of auto antistatic products, but...

    There are studies of the effect of EMR and static electricity on nausea,
    dizziness, and other symptoms mimicking 'motion sickness'.

    Some pets which have problems with motion sickness allegedly benefit
    from anti-static electricity strategies, and pets are generally pretty
    unresponsive to placebos. They are very smart, but they aren't
    typically placebo respondents.

    Sounds like a good opportunity for a well controlled pet vet research
    project.

    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Aug 21, 2005
    #16
  17. Troy Piggins

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2005-08-21, Troy Piggins <> wrote:
    > My girlfriend gets carsick. She heard those rubber strips that hang
    > from underside of car and touch the road help stop carsickness. I had
    > also heard about that, and that it had something to do with getting rid
    > of static in the car.
    >
    > Is that correct? How does it work?
    >
    > Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car and
    > the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and touching the
    > road.


    I don't know if that one works, but the 'earthing strips' can be seen
    dangling from a few cars so there are 'believers' out there.

    This advice looks realistic
    <http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/conditions/travelsickness1.shtml>

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Aug 21, 2005
    #17
  18. Captain America wrote:
    >
    > "Troy Piggins" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> Placebo effect, eh? Probably.

    >
    > Dumbass effect if you aske me. Car sickness is caused by one thing;
    > the motion of the car affects the inner ear, which in turn causes car
    > sickness. Period.


    Having not had much experience with boats, I was doing some writing and
    photography about the US Coast guard once upon a time, and discovered
    that if the horizon was in sight I was fine, but if it wasn't I'd get
    seasick just like throwing a switch -- bang! I first noticed this when
    I had to change a roll of film; looking down and losing sight - even
    peripherally - of the outside world was not a Good Thing. As soon as I
    looked up, again, and my body was again supplied with a reference point
    I was fine. For me, it wasn't the motion itself, but the motion without
    context. Datapoint, if relevant: this was a 41-foot boat in probably
    5-foot swells, not a slowly rolling or pitching cutter.


    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263

    Killing All Posts from GG: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
    End Of The Good GG Archive GUI: http://blinkynet.net/comp/gggui.html
     
    Blinky the Shark, Aug 21, 2005
    #18
  19. Re: Re: antistatic/carsickness prevention a myth

    On Sun, 21 Aug 2005 05:18:34 -0700, "Captain America"
    <wedy19836@@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    >"Troy Piggins" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >
    >> Placebo effect, eh? Probably.

    >
    >Dumbass effect if you ask me. Car sickness is caused by one thing; the
    >motion of the car affects the inner ear, which in turn causes car sickness.
    >Period.
    >

    I have two daughters who do not get sick in planes, trains, buses.

    But every time they are in an automobile, they whoop it up unless the
    car is equipped to discharge the static charge.

    Placebo.. no

    Neurotic..hmmm maybe although I seem to recall them being surprised
    when not car sick only to find out later that the chassis was
    "stapped".

    Malcolm
     
    Malcolm William Mason, Aug 21, 2005
    #19
  20. Troy Piggins

    Toolman Tim Guest

    Voltardo wrote:
    > Troy Piggins wrote:
    >
    >> My girlfriend gets carsick. She heard those rubber strips that hang
    >> from underside of car and touch the road help stop carsickness. I
    >> had also heard about that, and that it had something to do with
    >> getting rid of static in the car.
    >>
    >> Is that correct? How does it work?
    >>
    >> Also - what's the diff between a rubber strip connected to the car
    >> and the 4 tyres? They're rubber and connected to the car and
    >> touching the road.
    >>

    > Remember fender skirts, curb feelers? How about Continental kits, baby
    > moons or furry dice th hang on the mirror? To research your question,
    > burn orange candles in your house...supposed to keep elephants out.


    It works - haven't seen an elephant here in years <g>

    --
    Indecision is the key to flexibility.
     
    Toolman Tim, Aug 21, 2005
    #20
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