Anonymous hackers - how dey do dat?

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by RayLopez99, Dec 10, 2010.

  1. RayLopez99

    RayLopez99 Guest

    CNN claims you can have your PC turn into a bot by sending them an
    email saying "I consent".

    How is that done? Don't the AV vendors have a patch for them yet?

    RL
     
    RayLopez99, Dec 10, 2010
    #1
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  2. From: "RayLopez99" <>

    | CNN claims you can have your PC turn into a bot by sending them an
    | email saying "I consent".

    | How is that done? Don't the AV vendors have a patch for them yet?

    Where does CNN claim that ?

    --
    Dave
    Multi-AV Scanning Tool - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp
     
    David H. Lipman, Dec 10, 2010
    #2
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  3. RayLopez99 wrote:
    > CNN claims you can have your PC turn into a bot by sending them an
    > email saying "I consent".
    >
    > How is that done? Don't the AV vendors have a patch for them yet?


    You need to define terms. Seti and folding can be considered bots too.
    If they are saying malicious bots (and most people think "malicious"
    when hearing "bot" or "virus" or "worm" where it might not necessarily
    follow.

    They're all just "programs" that a user runs on his or her machine.

    (and yes, I'm already aware of the "Why a good virus is still a bad
    idea" article)
     
    FromTheRafters, Dec 10, 2010
    #3
  4. RayLopez99 wrote:
    > CNN claims you can have your PC turn into a bot by sending them an
    > email saying "I consent".


    Citation please?

    > How is that done? Don't the AV vendors have a patch for them yet?


    You need to define terms. Seti and Folding can be considered bots too.
    If they are not saying malicious bots (and most people think "malicious"
    when hearing "bot" or "virus" or "worm" where it might not necessarily
    follow), then your agreement is all that is needed.

    They're all just "programs" or "applications" that a user runs on his or
    her machine.

    (and yes, I'm already aware of the "Why a good virus is still a bad
    idea" article)
     
    FromTheRafters, Dec 10, 2010
    #4
  5. RayLopez99

    Dustin Guest

    RayLopez99 <> wrote in news:b7e29c00-f268-4a77-9e32-
    :

    > CNN claims you can have your PC turn into a bot by sending them an
    > email saying "I consent".
    >
    > How is that done? Don't the AV vendors have a patch for them yet?


    LOL. I printed this one.. I couldn't resist. I'm going to hang this in
    the computer room. Funny! shit man. You have made my day.


    --
    Hackers are generally only very weakly motivated by conventional rewards
    such as social approval or money. They tend to be attracted by
    challenges and excited by interesting toys, and to judge the interest of
    work or other activities in terms of the challenges offered and the toys
    they get to play with.
     
    Dustin, Dec 11, 2010
    #5
  6. RayLopez99

    RayLopez99 Guest

    On Dec 10, 3:55 pm, FromTheRafters <> wrote:
    > RayLopez99 wrote:
    >
    >  > CNN claims you can have your PC turn into a bot by sending them an
    >  > email saying "I consent".
    >
    > Citation please?


    CNN. This was a few days ago. Int'l edition. From what I surmised
    (just from what I know about PCs) the hackers must have some way of
    trying to penetrate a PC that might, under generic firewall rules,
    cause your software firewall to raise a red flag popup window like
    "program xyz is attempting to access your PC--allow?" and the user
    then clicks Yes if the user is sympathetic to the Anonymous group,
    allowing their machine to become a bot. The hackers would know which
    machine is 'sympathetic' from the email header, where they can read
    your IP address. From what I surmised. But I was expecting somebody
    here to know more.

    RL
     
    RayLopez99, Dec 11, 2010
    #6
  7. RayLopez99

    RayLopez99 Guest

    On Dec 11, 4:39 am, Dustin <> wrote:
    > RayLopez99 <> wrote in news:b7e29c00-f268-4a77-9e32-
    > :
    >
    > > CNN claims you can have your PC turn into a bot by sending them an
    > > email saying "I consent".

    >
    > > How is that done?  Don't the AV vendors have a patch for them yet?

    >
    > LOL. I printed this one.. I couldn't resist. I'm going to hang this in
    > the computer room. Funny! shit man. You have made my day.
    >


    You have a weird sense of humor Dustin. I guess shiny metal objects
    also hold your attention. Glad to have made your day.

    RL
     
    RayLopez99, Dec 11, 2010
    #7
  8. From: "RayLopez99" <>

    | On Dec 10, 3:55 pm, FromTheRafters <> wrote:
    >> RayLopez99 wrote:


    >> > CNN claims you can have your PC turn into a bot by sending them an
    >> > email saying "I consent".


    >> Citation please?


    | CNN. This was a few days ago. Int'l edition. From what I surmised
    | (just from what I know about PCs) the hackers must have some way of
    | trying to penetrate a PC that might, under generic firewall rules,
    | cause your software firewall to raise a red flag popup window like
    | "program xyz is attempting to access your PC--allow?" and the user
    | then clicks Yes if the user is sympathetic to the Anonymous group,
    | allowing their machine to become a bot. The hackers would know which
    | machine is 'sympathetic' from the email header, where they can read
    | your IP address. From what I surmised. But I was expecting somebody
    | here to know more.

    OK, please post the CNN URL.

    You based your question on a CNN claim but fail to exactly quote said claim nor point to a
    URL of the claim's text.

    We can't respond to what you wrote because of misquoting, snipping, grape-vine effect and
    other modifications to what CNN may have originaly claimed.

    Get the point ?

    --
    Dave
    Multi-AV Scanning Tool - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp
     
    David H. Lipman, Dec 11, 2010
    #8
  9. RayLopez99 wrote:
    > On Dec 10, 3:55 pm, FromTheRafters<> wrote:
    >> RayLopez99 wrote:
    >>
    >> > CNN claims you can have your PC turn into a bot by sending them an
    >> > email saying "I consent".

    >>
    >> Citation please?

    >
    > CNN. This was a few days ago. Int'l edition. From what I surmised
    > (just from what I know about PCs) the hackers must have some way of
    > trying to penetrate a PC that might, under generic firewall rules,
    > cause your software firewall to raise a red flag popup window like
    > "program xyz is attempting to access your PC--allow?" and the user
    > then clicks Yes if the user is sympathetic to the Anonymous group,
    > allowing their machine to become a bot. The hackers would know which
    > machine is 'sympathetic' from the email header, where they can read
    > your IP address. From what I surmised. But I was expecting somebody
    > here to know more.


    I suspect that you are misinterpreting what they are saying, but I
    cannot know without actually reading what you read at their site.

    Keep in mind that a "Bot" in this sense is an application, not an
    exploit. While a malicious bot can, through updating, become a malicious
    worm and spread using exploits, some bots (or botnets) are beneficial in
    nature.
     
    FromTheRafters, Dec 11, 2010
    #9
  10. RayLopez99

    Duh_OZ Guest

    On Dec 11, 7:52 am, "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~>
    wrote:

    > OK, please post the CNN URL.

    ==============
    I did a search on "I consent" and came up with the link:

    http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/12/09/hackers.wikileaks/index.html?iref=allsearch

    Snip:
    Helping the hacking forum known as "Anonymous" and "Operation Payback"
    can be as simple as sending an e-mail to one of the many websites it
    uses -- and letting the hackers take control of your computer.

    Anonymous claimed responsibility for disabling or disrupting the sites
    of MasterCard, Visa and PayPal this week. The attacks came on the
    heels of WikiLeaks leader Julian Assange's arrest.

    "You don't have to be at your computer. All you've got to do is send
    Anonymous an e-mail that says, 'I consent to you using my computer, do
    whatever you like,' " and the people with Anonymous link to your
    computer, connect it with others who've consented, and use the
    collective force (among the machines) to launch these attacks," Gregg
    Housh, a 34-year-old internet activist based in Boston told CNN.
     
    Duh_OZ, Dec 11, 2010
    #10
  11. From: "Duh_OZ" <>

    | On Dec 11, 7:52 am, "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~>
    | wrote:

    >> OK, please post the CNN URL.

    | ==============
    | I did a search on "I consent" and came up with the link:

    | http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/12/09/hackers.wikileaks/index.html?iref=allsearch

    | Snip:
    | Helping the hacking forum known as "Anonymous" and "Operation Payback"
    | can be as simple as sending an e-mail to one of the many websites it
    | uses -- and letting the hackers take control of your computer.

    | Anonymous claimed responsibility for disabling or disrupting the sites
    | of MasterCard, Visa and PayPal this week. The attacks came on the
    | heels of WikiLeaks leader Julian Assange's arrest.

    | "You don't have to be at your computer. All you've got to do is send
    | Anonymous an e-mail that says, 'I consent to you using my computer, do
    | whatever you like,' " and the people with Anonymous link to your
    | computer, connect it with others who've consented, and use the
    | collective force (among the machines) to launch these attacks," Gregg
    | Housh, a 34-year-old internet activist based in Boston told CNN.

    Great. Thanx Ozzy.

    Now RL has to chime in since you did his work (we'll probably not see any posts from him
    till Sunday) and relook at his question.

    --
    Dave
    Multi-AV Scanning Tool - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp
     
    David H. Lipman, Dec 11, 2010
    #11
  12. Duh_OZ wrote:
    > On Dec 11, 7:52 am, "David H. Lipman"<DLipman~>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> OK, please post the CNN URL.

    > ==============
    > I did a search on "I consent" and came up with the link:
    >
    > http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/12/09/hackers.wikileaks/index.html?iref=allsearch
    >
    > Snip:
    > Helping the hacking forum known as "Anonymous" and "Operation Payback"
    > can be as simple as sending an e-mail to one of the many websites it
    > uses -- and letting the hackers take control of your computer.
    >
    > Anonymous claimed responsibility for disabling or disrupting the sites
    > of MasterCard, Visa and PayPal this week. The attacks came on the
    > heels of WikiLeaks leader Julian Assange's arrest.
    >
    > "You don't have to be at your computer. All you've got to do is send
    > Anonymous an e-mail that says, 'I consent to you using my computer, do
    > whatever you like,' " and the people with Anonymous link to your
    > computer, connect it with others who've consented, and use the
    > collective force (among the machines) to launch these attacks," Gregg
    > Housh, a 34-year-old internet activist based in Boston told CNN.


    As I thought. You consent to running the application.
     
    FromTheRafters, Dec 11, 2010
    #12
  13. David H. Lipman wrote:
    > From: "Duh_OZ"<>
    >
    > | On Dec 11, 7:52 am, "David H. Lipman"<DLipman~>
    > | wrote:
    >
    >>> OK, please post the CNN URL.

    > | ==============
    > | I did a search on "I consent" and came up with the link:
    >
    > | http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/12/09/hackers.wikileaks/index.html?iref=allsearch
    >
    > | Snip:
    > | Helping the hacking forum known as "Anonymous" and "Operation Payback"
    > | can be as simple as sending an e-mail to one of the many websites it
    > | uses -- and letting the hackers take control of your computer.
    >
    > | Anonymous claimed responsibility for disabling or disrupting the sites
    > | of MasterCard, Visa and PayPal this week. The attacks came on the
    > | heels of WikiLeaks leader Julian Assange's arrest.
    >
    > | "You don't have to be at your computer. All you've got to do is send
    > | Anonymous an e-mail that says, 'I consent to you using my computer, do
    > | whatever you like,' " and the people with Anonymous link to your
    > | computer, connect it with others who've consented, and use the
    > | collective force (among the machines) to launch these attacks," Gregg
    > | Housh, a 34-year-old internet activist based in Boston told CNN.
    >
    > Great. Thanx Ozzy.
    >
    > Now RL has to chime in since you did his work (we'll probably not see any posts from him
    > till Sunday) and relook at his question.
    >

    And maybe he'll wxplain to us how an AV "Patch" would help. :eek:)
     
    FromTheRafters, Dec 11, 2010
    #13
  14. From: "FromTheRafters" <>

    | Duh_OZ wrote:
    >> On Dec 11, 7:52 am, "David H. Lipman"<DLipman~>
    >> wrote:


    >>> OK, please post the CNN URL.

    >> ==============
    >> I did a search on "I consent" and came up with the link:


    >> http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/12/09/hackers.wikileaks/index.html?iref=allsearch


    >> Snip:
    >> Helping the hacking forum known as "Anonymous" and "Operation Payback"
    >> can be as simple as sending an e-mail to one of the many websites it
    >> uses -- and letting the hackers take control of your computer.


    >> Anonymous claimed responsibility for disabling or disrupting the sites
    >> of MasterCard, Visa and PayPal this week. The attacks came on the
    >> heels of WikiLeaks leader Julian Assange's arrest.


    >> "You don't have to be at your computer. All you've got to do is send
    >> Anonymous an e-mail that says, 'I consent to you using my computer, do
    >> whatever you like,' " and the people with Anonymous link to your
    >> computer, connect it with others who've consented, and use the
    >> collective force (among the machines) to launch these attacks," Gregg
    >> Housh, a 34-year-old internet activist based in Boston told CNN.


    | As I thought. You consent to running the application.

    Yes, which makes the installation legal. However the action to be performed is quasi
    legal but definitely an ISP AUP violation.

    --
    Dave
    Multi-AV Scanning Tool - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp
     
    David H. Lipman, Dec 11, 2010
    #14
  15. David H. Lipman wrote:
    > From: "FromTheRafters"<>
    >
    > | Duh_OZ wrote:
    >>> On Dec 11, 7:52 am, "David H. Lipman"<DLipman~>
    >>> wrote:

    >
    >>>> OK, please post the CNN URL.
    >>> ==============
    >>> I did a search on "I consent" and came up with the link:

    >
    >>> http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/12/09/hackers.wikileaks/index.html?iref=allsearch

    >
    >>> Snip:
    >>> Helping the hacking forum known as "Anonymous" and "Operation Payback"
    >>> can be as simple as sending an e-mail to one of the many websites it
    >>> uses -- and letting the hackers take control of your computer.

    >
    >>> Anonymous claimed responsibility for disabling or disrupting the sites
    >>> of MasterCard, Visa and PayPal this week. The attacks came on the
    >>> heels of WikiLeaks leader Julian Assange's arrest.

    >
    >>> "You don't have to be at your computer. All you've got to do is send
    >>> Anonymous an e-mail that says, 'I consent to you using my computer, do
    >>> whatever you like,' " and the people with Anonymous link to your
    >>> computer, connect it with others who've consented, and use the
    >>> collective force (among the machines) to launch these attacks," Gregg
    >>> Housh, a 34-year-old internet activist based in Boston told CNN.

    >
    > | As I thought. You consent to running the application.
    >
    > Yes, which makes the installation legal. However the action to be performed is quasi
    > legal but definitely an ISP AUP violation.
    >

    RayLopez99 seemed to be under the impression that an exploit was
    involved (one that AV could "patch") and that the application was
    surreptitiously installed.

    Yes, I do believe that ISP's would frown upon their clients taking part
    in such cybercrime attacks.
     
    FromTheRafters, Dec 11, 2010
    #15
  16. On Sat, 11 Dec 2010 02:39:32 GMT, Dustin wrote:

    > RayLopez99 <> wrote in news:b7e29c00-f268-4a77-9e32-
    > :
    >
    >> CNN claims you can have your PC turn into a bot by sending them an
    >> email saying "I consent".
    >>
    >> How is that done? Don't the AV vendors have a patch for them yet?

    >
    > LOL. I printed this one.. I couldn't resist. I'm going to hang this in
    > the computer room. Funny! shit man. You have made my day.


    Yeah, I remember when Ray was trolling the fitness and weights
    newsgroups and BBs trying to get medical advice on why his one of his
    nuts hurt. He refused to admit to what was an obvious fact to all of
    us that was when you whack-off 6-10x/day, and are RHanded, chances are
    your going to have a sore right testicle. lol

    True story btw.

    https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/User:Raylopez99
    --
    Talk about F-Cars - www.ferrarichat.com/forum/member.php?u=89702
     
    Ari Silverstein, Dec 11, 2010
    #16
  17. RayLopez99

    Dustin Guest

    Duh_OZ <> wrote in
    news::

    > On Dec 11, 7:52 am, "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> OK, please post the CNN URL.

    > =============I did a search on "I consent" and came up with the
    > link:
    >
    > http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/12/09/hackers.wikileaks/index.html?ire
    > f=allsearch
    >
    > Snip:
    > Helping the hacking forum known as "Anonymous" and "Operation
    > Payback" can be as simple as sending an e-mail to one of the many
    > websites it uses -- and letting the hackers take control of your
    > computer.
    >
    > Anonymous claimed responsibility for disabling or disrupting the
    > sites of MasterCard, Visa and PayPal this week. The attacks came on
    > the heels of WikiLeaks leader Julian Assange's arrest.
    >
    > "You don't have to be at your computer. All you've got to do is send
    > Anonymous an e-mail that says, 'I consent to you using my computer,
    > do whatever you like,' " and the people with Anonymous link to your
    > computer, connect it with others who've consented, and use the
    > collective force (among the machines) to launch these attacks,"
    > Gregg Housh, a 34-year-old internet activist based in Boston told
    > CNN.


    No hacking going on here then. The users are willingly joining their
    computers upto a botnet for DDoS purposes. A good demonstration of
    civil disobedience. Power to the people!




    --
    Hackers are generally only very weakly motivated by conventional
    rewards such as social approval or money. They tend to be attracted by
    challenges and excited by interesting toys, and to judge the interest
    of work or other activities in terms of the challenges offered and the
    toys they get to play with.
     
    Dustin, Dec 12, 2010
    #17
  18. RayLopez99

    Dustin Guest

    "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in
    news::

    > From: "FromTheRafters" <>
    >
    >| Duh_OZ wrote:
    >>> On Dec 11, 7:52 am, "David H. Lipman"<DLipman~>
    >>> wrote:

    >
    >>>> OK, please post the CNN URL.
    >>> ==============
    >>> I did a search on "I consent" and came up with the link:

    >
    >>> http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/12/09/hackers.wikileaks/index.html?i
    >>> ref=allsearch

    >
    >>> Snip:
    >>> Helping the hacking forum known as "Anonymous" and "Operation
    >>> Payback" can be as simple as sending an e-mail to one of the many
    >>> websites it uses -- and letting the hackers take control of your
    >>> computer.

    >
    >>> Anonymous claimed responsibility for disabling or disrupting the
    >>> sites of MasterCard, Visa and PayPal this week. The attacks came
    >>> on the heels of WikiLeaks leader Julian Assange's arrest.

    >
    >>> "You don't have to be at your computer. All you've got to do is
    >>> send Anonymous an e-mail that says, 'I consent to you using my
    >>> computer, do whatever you like,' " and the people with Anonymous
    >>> link to your computer, connect it with others who've consented,
    >>> and use the collective force (among the machines) to launch these
    >>> attacks," Gregg Housh, a 34-year-old internet activist based in
    >>> Boston told CNN.

    >
    >| As I thought. You consent to running the application.
    >
    > Yes, which makes the installation legal. However the action to be
    > performed is quasi legal but definitely an ISP AUP violation.
    >


    It depends. LOIC for example doesn't exploit vulnerabilities in the
    tcp/ip stack; it sends normal packet data to the machine, randomly and
    consistently. From the victims point of view, it's just overloaded with
    two many requests.


    --
    Hackers are generally only very weakly motivated by conventional
    rewards such as social approval or money. They tend to be attracted by
    challenges and excited by interesting toys, and to judge the interest
    of work or other activities in terms of the challenges offered and the
    toys they get to play with.
     
    Dustin, Dec 12, 2010
    #18
  19. From: "Dustin" <>

    | Duh_OZ <> wrote in
    | news::

    >> On Dec 11, 7:52 am, "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~>
    >> wrote:


    >>> OK, please post the CNN URL.

    >> =============I did a search on "I consent" and came up with the
    >> link:


    >> http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/12/09/hackers.wikileaks/index.html?ire
    >> f=allsearch


    >> Snip:
    >> Helping the hacking forum known as "Anonymous" and "Operation
    >> Payback" can be as simple as sending an e-mail to one of the many
    >> websites it uses -- and letting the hackers take control of your
    >> computer.


    >> Anonymous claimed responsibility for disabling or disrupting the
    >> sites of MasterCard, Visa and PayPal this week. The attacks came on
    >> the heels of WikiLeaks leader Julian Assange's arrest.


    >> "You don't have to be at your computer. All you've got to do is send
    >> Anonymous an e-mail that says, 'I consent to you using my computer,
    >> do whatever you like,' " and the people with Anonymous link to your
    >> computer, connect it with others who've consented, and use the
    >> collective force (among the machines) to launch these attacks,"
    >> Gregg Housh, a 34-year-old internet activist based in Boston told
    >> CNN.


    | No hacking going on here then. The users are willingly joining their
    | computers upto a botnet for DDoS purposes. A good demonstration of
    | civil disobedience. Power to the people!

    Too bad it is "misplaced" hacktivism.

    --
    Dave
    Multi-AV Scanning Tool - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp
     
    David H. Lipman, Dec 12, 2010
    #19
  20. RayLopez99

    RayLopez99 Guest

    On Dec 11, 3:52 pm, "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~>
    wrote:
    .
    >
    > OK, please post the CNN URL.
    >

    Don't have it. CNN stories are always hard to find anyway--their
    search tool sucks.

    But this is not a peer reviewed science site. Do you have any ideas
    how evil hackers can take over your machine if you send them an
    email? That is the relevant query. I guess your lack of a response
    on that issue speaks for itself. Get the point?

    RL
     
    RayLopez99, Dec 12, 2010
    #20
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