And the decorations on Google today are....

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Steve Bell, Feb 3, 2004.

  1. Steve Bell

    Steve Bell Guest

    A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    search engine itself.

    The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    (knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    precise date of birth.

    Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).

    Posthumous congratulations.

    Steve B.
     
    Steve Bell, Feb 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. Steve Bell

    Chris Guest

    (Steve Bell) wrote in
    news::

    > A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    > search engine itself.
    >
    > The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    > ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    > (knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    > name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    > precise date of birth.
    >
    > Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    > the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).
    >
    > Posthumous congratulations.
    >
    > Steve B.
    >

    Gaston Julia comes up on my version of google, i must be special :)


    --
    Chris

    "Two men walk into a bar. You'd think the second one would've ducked..."
     
    Chris, Feb 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. Steve Bell

    Brian Harmer Guest

    On 3 Feb 2004 11:47:21 -0800, (Steve Bell) wrote:

    >A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    >search engine itself.
    >
    >The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    >ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    >(knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    >name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    >precise date of birth.
    >
    >Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    >the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).
    >
    >Posthumous congratulations.



    Did you try clicking on the Google logo, Steve? If not, try it now.
    You could have saved yourself ten minutes :)
     
    Brian Harmer, Feb 3, 2004
    #3
  4. Steve Bell

    steve Guest

    Steve Bell wrote:

    > A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    > search engine itself.
    >
    > The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    > ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    > (knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    > name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    > precise date of birth.
    >
    > Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    > the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).
    >
    > Posthumous congratulations.
    >
    > Steve B.


    Good!

    I'm using Mozilla 1.4 on Xandros Linux 2.0.

    A tag saying "Gaston Julia" appears when I pause the mouse pointer over the
    Google imagemap at the top.
     
    steve, Feb 3, 2004
    #4
  5. Steve Bell

    Warwick Guest

    On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 10:05:33 +1300, steve wrote:

    > Steve Bell wrote:
    >
    >> A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    >> search engine itself.
    >>
    >> The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    >> ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    >> (knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    >> name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    >> precise date of birth.
    >>
    >> Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    >> the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).
    >>
    >> Posthumous congratulations.
    >>
    >> Steve B.

    >
    > Good!
    >
    > I'm using Mozilla 1.4 on Xandros Linux 2.0.
    >
    > A tag saying "Gaston Julia" appears when I pause the mouse pointer over the
    > Google imagemap at the top.


    Can't help but notice the cardioid shrub on top of the G.
    It is Mandelbrot's set, who I guess is the first best-known figure in the
    study of fractals. (his first name is Benoit and he is still alive afaik).
     
    Warwick, Feb 3, 2004
    #5
  6. Steve Bell

    Sue Bilstein Guest

    "Brian Harmer" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    >
    > Did you try clicking on the Google logo, Steve? If not, try it now.
    > You could have saved yourself ten minutes :)


    Beautiful fractal images, pictures of Julia and someone labelled Mandel -
    Mandelbrot?

    Julia appears not to have had a nose, poor guy.
     
    Sue Bilstein, Feb 4, 2004
    #6
  7. Steve Bell

    Steve B Guest

    On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 20:00:30 GMT, Chris <> wrote:

    > (Steve Bell) wrote in
    >news::
    >
    >> A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    >> search engine itself.
    >>
    >> The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    >> ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    >> (knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    >> name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    >> precise date of birth.
    >>
    >> Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    >> the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).
    >>
    >> Posthumous congratulations.
    >>
    >> Steve B.
    >>

    >Gaston Julia comes up on my version of google, i must be special :)


    Yes "Gaston Julia" came up later in the day for me, and now it says
    "Gaston Julia's birthday".

    I think they must gradually give you more clues as the day wears on.

    Steve B.
     
    Steve B, Feb 4, 2004
    #7
  8. Steve Bell

    Chris Guest

    Steve B <> wrote in
    news::

    > On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 20:00:30 GMT, Chris <> wrote:
    >
    >> (Steve Bell) wrote in
    >>news::
    >>
    >>> A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    >>> search engine itself.
    >>>
    >>> The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    >>> ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    >>> (knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    >>> name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    >>> precise date of birth.
    >>>
    >>> Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    >>> the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).
    >>>
    >>> Posthumous congratulations.
    >>>
    >>> Steve B.
    >>>

    >>Gaston Julia comes up on my version of google, i must be special :)

    >
    > Yes "Gaston Julia" came up later in the day for me, and now it says
    > "Gaston Julia's birthday".
    >
    > I think they must gradually give you more clues as the day wears on.
    >
    > Steve B.
    >
    >


    Bugger, I though I was special :(

    --
    Chris

    "Two men walk into a bar. You'd think the second one would've ducked..."
     
    Chris, Feb 4, 2004
    #8
  9. Hi there,

    Steve Bell wrote:
    > A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    > search engine itself.
    >
    > The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    > ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    > (knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    > name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    > precise date of birth.
    >
    > Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    > the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).


    Hurrah! I presume its a posthumous birthday, and that Mr Mandelbrot was
    for the same reason unable to attend?

    --
    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Remove spamblocker to send replies direct to my email...
     
    Chris Wilkinson, Feb 4, 2004
    #9
  10. Steve Bell

    Warwick Guest

    On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 22:26:09 +1300, Chris Wilkinson wrote:

    > Hi there,
    >
    > Steve Bell wrote:
    >> A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    >> search engine itself.
    >>
    >> The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    >> ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    >> (knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    >> name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    >> precise date of birth.
    >>
    >> Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    >> the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).

    >
    > Hurrah! I presume its a posthumous birthday, and that Mr Mandelbrot was
    > for the same reason unable to attend?


    Benoit Mandelbrot is still alive afaik.
     
    Warwick, Feb 4, 2004
    #10
  11. Steve Bell

    Chris Guest

    Warwick <> wrote in
    news:1hvgcq5qu3019$.ikeifxx8pjkd$:

    > On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 22:26:09 +1300, Chris Wilkinson wrote:
    >
    >> Hi there,
    >>
    >> Steve Bell wrote:
    >>> A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    >>> search engine itself.
    >>>
    >>> The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    >>> ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    >>> (knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    >>> name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    >>> precise date of birth.
    >>>
    >>> Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    >>> the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).

    >>
    >> Hurrah! I presume its a posthumous birthday, and that Mr Mandelbrot was
    >> for the same reason unable to attend?

    >
    > Benoit Mandelbrot is still alive afaik.
    >


    Yeah, he got the 2003 Japan Prize for Science and Technology so I guess
    theres a good chance. Besides hes not that old anyway - only 80. his web
    site : http://www.math.yale.edu/mandelbrot/

    --
    Chris

    "Two men walk into a bar. You'd think the second one would've ducked..."
     
    Chris, Feb 4, 2004
    #11
  12. Hi there,

    Chris wrote:
    > Warwick <> wrote in
    > news:1hvgcq5qu3019$.ikeifxx8pjkd$:
    >
    >
    >>On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 22:26:09 +1300, Chris Wilkinson wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Hi there,
    >>>
    >>>Steve Bell wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    >>>>search engine itself.
    >>>>
    >>>>The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    >>>>ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    >>>>(knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    >>>>name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    >>>>precise date of birth.
    >>>>
    >>>>Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    >>>>the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).
    >>>
    >>>Hurrah! I presume its a posthumous birthday, and that Mr Mandelbrot was
    >>>for the same reason unable to attend?

    >>
    >>Benoit Mandelbrot is still alive afaik.

    >
    > Yeah, he got the 2003 Japan Prize for Science and Technology so I guess
    > theres a good chance. Besides hes not that old anyway - only 80. his web
    > site : http://www.math.yale.edu/mandelbrot/


    Wow. My jaded knowledge of mathematical history does need updating! I
    though Mandelbrot was older than Julia, but that both discovered their
    secrets in the late 1800's! Obviously not. :)

    Still, I frequently use fractals on my machine (fractals make very cool
    pigments in POV-raytrace), and I used to have a realtime fractal zoomer
    which could run in a sort-of movie mode...

    --
    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Remove spamblocker to send replies direct to my email...
     
    Chris Wilkinson, Feb 4, 2004
    #12
  13. In article <>,
    (Steve Bell) wrote:

    >The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    >ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    >(knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    >name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    >precise date of birth.


    For anything vaguely scholarly like that, a good place to start
    searching is Wikipedia <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julia_set>.
     
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, Feb 5, 2004
    #13
  14. In article <>,
    Chris Wilkinson <> wrote:

    >Hi there,
    >
    >Chris wrote:
    >> Warwick <> wrote in
    >> news:1hvgcq5qu3019$.ikeifxx8pjkd$:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Benoit Mandelbrot is still alive afaik.

    >>
    >> Yeah, he got the 2003 Japan Prize for Science and Technology so I guess
    >> theres a good chance. Besides hes not that old anyway - only 80. his web
    >> site : http://www.math.yale.edu/mandelbrot/

    >
    >Wow. My jaded knowledge of mathematical history does need updating! I
    >though Mandelbrot was older than Julia, but that both discovered their
    >secrets in the late 1800's! Obviously not. :)


    I have Mandelbrot's book, "The Fractal Geometry of Nature", published in
    the 1970s when he was working at IBM, if I recall correctly. Now if I
    can only find it...
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Feb 5, 2004
    #14
  15. "Steve Bell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >A self-referential promotion, in my case, for the utility of the
    > search engine itself.
    >
    > The hint word "Julia" comes up in a mouse-over, but only with a full
    > ten minutes Googling was I able (a) to find the other half of the name
    > (knowing about "Julia sets" but not knowing whether it was a first
    > name (as in "a Leonardo painting") or a surname.) and (b) find out a
    > precise date of birth.
    >
    > Gaston Julia, French mathematician and the second best-known figure in
    > the study of fractals, is eleventy-one "today" (US time).



    Save yourself some time next time Google displays one of these logos,
    could've found the explanation in a couple of seconds

    as well as having a mouse over, the logo itself is a hyperlink to an
    explaination as well



    http://www.google.com/holidaylogos.html
     
    Nathan Mercer, Feb 6, 2004
    #15
  16. Hi there,

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Chris Wilkinson <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hi there,
    >>
    >>Chris wrote:
    >>
    >>>Warwick <> wrote in
    >>>news:1hvgcq5qu3019$.ikeifxx8pjkd$:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Benoit Mandelbrot is still alive afaik.
    >>>
    >>>Yeah, he got the 2003 Japan Prize for Science and Technology so I guess
    >>>theres a good chance. Besides hes not that old anyway - only 80. his web
    >>>site : http://www.math.yale.edu/mandelbrot/

    >>
    >>Wow. My jaded knowledge of mathematical history does need updating! I
    >>though Mandelbrot was older than Julia, but that both discovered their
    >>secrets in the late 1800's! Obviously not. :)

    >
    >
    > I have Mandelbrot's book, "The Fractal Geometry of Nature", published in
    > the 1970s when he was working at IBM, if I recall correctly. Now if I
    > can only find it...


    I find fractals fascinating. With the right iterations I can generate
    impressive fractal height fields for use in POV-raytrace, that look
    very natural as mountains when translated into 3D-space...

    --
    Kind regards,

    Chris Wilkinson, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Remove spamblocker to send replies direct to my email...
     
    Chris Wilkinson, Feb 6, 2004
    #16
  17. Steve Bell

    Steve B Guest

    On Fri, 06 Feb 2004 21:00:26 +1300, Chris Wilkinson
    <> wrote:

    >Hi there,
    >
    >Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> Chris Wilkinson <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Hi there,
    >>>
    >>>Chris wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Warwick <> wrote in
    >>>>news:1hvgcq5qu3019$.ikeifxx8pjkd$:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Benoit Mandelbrot is still alive afaik.
    >>>>
    >>>>Yeah, he got the 2003 Japan Prize for Science and Technology so I guess
    >>>>theres a good chance. Besides hes not that old anyway - only 80. his web
    >>>>site : http://www.math.yale.edu/mandelbrot/
    >>>
    >>>Wow. My jaded knowledge of mathematical history does need updating! I
    >>>though Mandelbrot was older than Julia, but that both discovered their
    >>>secrets in the late 1800's! Obviously not. :)

    >>
    >>
    >> I have Mandelbrot's book, "The Fractal Geometry of Nature", published in
    >> the 1970s when he was working at IBM, if I recall correctly. Now if I
    >> can only find it...

    >
    >I find fractals fascinating. With the right iterations I can generate
    >impressive fractal height fields for use in POV-raytrace, that look
    >very natural as mountains when translated into 3D-space...


    You wouldn't quite call them fractals, I think, but a related pursuit
    is to plot an x,y point (just using one colour) where x and y are
    quite a simple and consistent function of the previous x and y. With
    certain functions (and maybe someone can refresh my memory as to what
    kinds) you get a consistent but irregular pattern that builds to ever
    more detail within a limited space.

    One of the most interesting ones I got was a rectangle, canted over at
    some fractional angle to the axes, with round bulges at each corner.
    Three of them were fairly regular bumps, but the bottom right one had
    a "ding" in it like a tree that had been damaged and continued to grow
    around the scar.

    Wish I could remember the function.

    Steve B.
     
    Steve B, Feb 6, 2004
    #17
  18. Steve Bell

    Warwick Guest

    On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 03:53:37 +1300, Steve B wrote:

    > On Fri, 06 Feb 2004 21:00:26 +1300, Chris Wilkinson
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Hi there,
    >>
    >>Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Chris Wilkinson <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Hi there,
    >>>>
    >>>>Chris wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Warwick <> wrote in
    >>>>>news:1hvgcq5qu3019$.ikeifxx8pjkd$:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Benoit Mandelbrot is still alive afaik.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Yeah, he got the 2003 Japan Prize for Science and Technology so I guess
    >>>>>theres a good chance. Besides hes not that old anyway - only 80. his web
    >>>>>site : http://www.math.yale.edu/mandelbrot/
    >>>>
    >>>>Wow. My jaded knowledge of mathematical history does need updating! I
    >>>>though Mandelbrot was older than Julia, but that both discovered their
    >>>>secrets in the late 1800's! Obviously not. :)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I have Mandelbrot's book, "The Fractal Geometry of Nature", published in
    >>> the 1970s when he was working at IBM, if I recall correctly. Now if I
    >>> can only find it...

    >>
    >>I find fractals fascinating. With the right iterations I can generate
    >>impressive fractal height fields for use in POV-raytrace, that look
    >>very natural as mountains when translated into 3D-space...

    >
    > You wouldn't quite call them fractals, I think, but a related pursuit
    > is to plot an x,y point (just using one colour) where x and y are
    > quite a simple and consistent function of the previous x and y. With
    > certain functions (and maybe someone can refresh my memory as to what
    > kinds) you get a consistent but irregular pattern that builds to ever
    > more detail within a limited space.
    >
    > One of the most interesting ones I got was a rectangle, canted over at
    > some fractional angle to the axes, with round bulges at each corner.
    > Three of them were fairly regular bumps, but the bottom right one had
    > a "ding" in it like a tree that had been damaged and continued to grow
    > around the scar.
    >
    > Wish I could remember the function.
    >
    > Steve B.


    There are plenty of fractal based terrain generators available in source
    code form online that the authors do not mind giving away.
    I got stuck with ray trace tho colouring algorithms are complex enough
    without adding a height factor! besides I need to work on optimising
    algorithms before I think about height. `
    but yes fascinating science for sure.
     
    Warwick, Feb 6, 2004
    #18
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