AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Simone Kerby, Mar 4, 2004.

  1. Simone Kerby

    Simone Kerby Guest

    AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD

    In general, which offers a more healthy diet?

    Americans tend toward fast foods, either take-out
    or home cooking that does not take too much time
    to prepare.

    In Europe, people still spend hours over a hot stove.
    People still stop at the market on the way home from
    work instead of weekly or monthly shopping as in
    North America.

    What are your favorite American dishes?

    What are your favorite European dishes?

    What are your thoughts on the difference in these 2
    styles of cuisine?
     
    Simone Kerby, Mar 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. Simone Kerby

    Diabolik Guest

    "Simone Kerby" <> wrote in message
    news:4046C770.6723.1DCF0FD@localhost...
    > AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    >
    > In general, which offers a more healthy diet?


    MacDonalds.

    >
    > Americans tend toward fast foods, either take-out
    > or home cooking that does not take too much time
    > to prepare.
    >
    > In Europe, people still spend hours over a hot stove.
    > People still stop at the market on the way home from
    > work instead of weekly or monthly shopping as in
    > North America.
    >
    > What are your favorite American dishes?


    MacDonalds.

    >
    > What are your favorite European dishes?


    None.

    >
    > What are your thoughts on the difference in these 2
    > styles of cuisine?


    MacDonalds rules!
     
    Diabolik, Mar 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. Simone Kerby

    Jupiter Guest

    On Thu, 04 Mar 2004 06:06:40 -0500, "Simone Kerby"
    <> wrote:

    >AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    >
    >In general, which offers a more healthy diet?
    >
    >Americans tend toward fast foods, either take-out
    >or home cooking that does not take too much time
    >to prepare.
    >
    >In Europe, people still spend hours over a hot stove.
    >People still stop at the market on the way home from
    >work instead of weekly or monthly shopping as in
    >North America.
    >
    >What are your favorite American dishes?
    >
    >What are your favorite European dishes?
    >
    >What are your thoughts on the difference in these 2
    >styles of cuisine?


    What part of Europe are you talking about?

    Transylvania? Carpo-Ruthenia? 19th Century Serbia?

    Most of modern Europe has 'Supermarkets' and 'Hypermarkets', France
    probably has some of the biggest in the world. Maybe what's left of
    the traditional Balkan and Eastern European peasantry still have to
    stop at the market every day or slaughter a pig or sheep and slave for
    hours over a hot stove with pig's heads, beetroots, sheep brains etc.,
    but most of the others nip off to the Hypermarket every week or so in
    their automobiles and stock up just like you do!
     
    Jupiter, Mar 4, 2004
    #3
  4. "Simone Kerby" <> wrote in message
    news:4046C770.6723.1DCF0FD@localhost...
    > AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD

    (snip)
    >
    > What are your favorite American dishes?


    +++ Halle Berry
    >
    > What are your favorite European dishes?


    +++ Mel B (from the Spice Girls)
    >
    > What are your thoughts on the difference in these 2
    > styles of cuisine?


    +++ Both are tasty but, the European "dish" is a bit more mature and may be
    a bit more spicy. The difference, what there is, is mainly in the packaging.
    Viva le Difference!
     
    Journalist-North, Mar 4, 2004
    #4
  5. "Simone Kerby" <> wrote in message
    news:4046C770.6723.1DCF0FD@localhost...
    > AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    >
    > In general, which offers a more healthy diet?
    >
    > Americans tend toward fast foods, either take-out
    > or home cooking that does not take too much time
    > to prepare.
    >
    > In Europe, people still spend hours over a hot stove.
    > People still stop at the market on the way home from
    > work instead of weekly or monthly shopping as in
    > North America.
    >
    > What are your favorite American dishes?
    >
    > What are your favorite European dishes?
    >
    > What are your thoughts on the difference in these 2
    > styles of cuisine?



    KERBYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY
    You are such a loser.
     
    Texas Longhorns, Mar 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Simone Kerby

    J. Helman Guest

    "Simone Kerby" <> wrote in message news:<4046C770.6723.1DCF0FD@localhost>...
    > AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    >
    > In general, which offers a more healthy diet?
    >
    > Americans tend toward fast foods, either take-out
    > or home cooking that does not take too much time
    > to prepare.
    >
    > In Europe, people still spend hours over a hot stove.
    > People still stop at the market on the way home from
    > work instead of weekly or monthly shopping as in
    > North America.
    >
    > What are your favorite American dishes?
    >
    > What are your favorite European dishes?
    >
    > What are your thoughts on the difference in these 2
    > styles of cuisine?


    I think you are making sweeping generalizations. It's true that
    Americans eat way too much fast food, many Americans don't really
    cook, and our lifestyle isn't all that healthy. However, plenty of
    Americans still purchase fresh ingredients (maybe not on a daily
    basis, but more than once a week or month) and make good food at home.

    Also, Europe has its own fast-food/convenience food traditions.
    Americans didn't invent fish and chips or pizza, the British and the
    Italians did. We may have put the hot dog in the bun and turned it
    into fast food, but frankfurters come from Germany, and they're no
    healthier over there than they are over here. And French fries may
    not be French, but they are Belgian.
     
    J. Helman, Mar 4, 2004
    #6
  7. Simone Kerby

    Ben Smith Guest

    So Diabolik does that mean you like Ronald McDonald?.

    Regards,

    Ben Smith
     
    Ben Smith, Mar 4, 2004
    #7
  8. Simone Kerby

    Dimitri Guest

    "Simone Kerby" <> wrote in message
    news:4046C770.6723.1DCF0FD@localhost...
    > AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    >
    > In general, which offers a more healthy diet?


    Neither, the use of available food is an individual
    choice/obession/decision. You can become just as healther or unhealthy as
    your taste and eating habits allow.

    Dimitri

    <snip>
     
    Dimitri, Mar 4, 2004
    #8
  9. "Simone Kerby" <> wrote in message news:<4046C770.6723.1DCF0FD@localhost>...
    > AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    >
    > In general, which offers a more healthy diet?
    >
    > Americans tend toward fast foods, either take-out
    > or home cooking that does not take too much time
    > to prepare.
    >
    > In Europe, people still spend hours over a hot stove.
    > People still stop at the market on the way home from
    > work instead of weekly or monthly shopping as in
    > North America.



    Interesting...I've read that France is McDonald's single most
    profitable market outside of the US. IIRC there is a French chain
    that offers nothing but frozen food for sale...and it's very, very
    popular.

    Many people in Europe shop just like Americans - in bulk and at huge
    supermarkets, which in Europe are called "hypermarkets" (the
    hypermarket being a French invention). They drive their cars to the
    Tescos or whatever that litter the outskirts of most European cities
    of any size - it's the same from Newcastle to Krakow to Palermo to
    Oslo. Growth of this kind of shopping has been especially rapid in
    the former Eastern Bloc states....

    Here in Chicago I shop just like an "old - fashioned" European - I
    shop several times a week at smaller stores for my vittles. Don't
    have a car, so I don't drive to Costco or wherever to shop, I walk or
    take the bus. There are a lot of us like that here ;-)

    US - style fast food has established healthy footholds all over
    Europe, from Paris and Rome to provincial Russia and other former
    Communist states. Some of these firms are US, some of them are home -
    grown e.g. in Germany you can find "Schnell Imbiss" outlets
    everywhere, and there is a chain in Russia that offers "home - style"
    Russian food fast and cheap. They mostly use the same marketing ploys
    and technologies as McDo's, etc. Pizza is a very popular fast food
    both in the States and everywhere in Europe - is this a "US" or
    "European" phenomenon...???


    >
    > What are your favorite American dishes?
    >
    > What are your favorite European dishes?
    >
    > What are your thoughts on the difference in these 2
    > styles of cuisine?



    There is increasingly a "world cuisine" that comprises stuff like Tex
    - Mex, Asian (stir fry and sushi) hamburgers, Italian, fish and chips,
    and many other things. In pretty much any city of any size all over
    the world these "cuisines" are readily available. You can great sushi
    in Vladivostok and pretty good Singapore noodles in St. Paul and
    decent hamburgers in Kathmandu and tolerable pizza in Havana and and
    fajitas and margaritas in Bangalore and Southern BBQ in London and
    quiche in Beirut...etcetera, etcetera, etcetera....

    And what about those "Irish" pubs that are ubiquitous absolutely
    everywhere? Those are big world - wide chain operations, not the
    result of some disgruntled Irish ex - pat wanting to open up a wee bit
    'o the old sod at the airport in Osaka or in downtown Santiago....

    I declare your questions as to preferences, then, as moot :)

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
    Gregory Morrow, Mar 4, 2004
    #9
  10. Simone Kerby

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Dimitri wrote:

    > "Simone Kerby" <> wrote in message
    > news:4046C770.6723.1DCF0FD@localhost...
    >
    >>AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    >>
    >>In general, which offers a more healthy diet?

    >
    >
    > Neither, the use of available food is an individual
    > choice/obession/decision. You can become just as healther or unhealthy as
    > your taste and eating habits allow.
    >
    > Dimitri
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >

    Quite true. ON my visit to Europe, I saw quite as many obese, often
    grossly obese, people as I see here in the US.
     
    Ron Hunter, Mar 4, 2004
    #10
  11. Simone Kerby

    Axel Kurth Guest

    Simone Kerby wrote:
    >
    > AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    >
    > In general, which offers a more healthy diet?
    >
    > Americans tend toward fast foods, either take-out
    > or home cooking that does not take too much time
    > to prepare.
    >
    > In Europe, people still spend hours over a hot stove.
    > People still stop at the market on the way home from
    > work instead of weekly or monthly shopping as in
    > North America.
    >
    > What are your favorite American dishes?
    >
    > What are your favorite European dishes?
    >
    > What are your thoughts on the difference in these 2
    > styles of cuisine?


    now if you ask me, there is no difference between american or european
    food, I have had great meals in either place many times. if the cook
    is crap the food is crap in either location, if you like food
    which tastes better after you ate it (Mc.. B...K.. etc) than you can
    get that also on both sides of the big water.
    what realy is the difference is the way and what they eat in the US
    junk food fast food which feeds you on a fast road to the grave
    that makes the obesety and unhelthiness you see so much in the US
     
    Axel Kurth, Mar 4, 2004
    #11
  12. Simone Kerby

    Paolo Pizzi Guest

    Ron Hunter wrote:

    > Quite true. ON my visit to Europe, I saw quite as many
    > obese, often grossly obese, people as I see here in the US.


    Judging by your blatant lies, I'd say you are a Republican.

    For anyone else, here's some SCIENTIFIC facts, from a
    reputable US source:

    "The study authors discovered this country had the highest rates of obese
    (24 percent) and very obese (13 percent) people and the lowest rates of
    normal (22 percent) people. Asia had the highest rate of normal-weight
    individuals (58 percent), Western Europe came next (31 percent), followed
    by Eastern Europe (29 percent), Latin America (28 percent), Australia/New
    Zealand (26 percent), and Canada (23 percent). Australia/New Zealand and
    Canada tied for second place in the "very obese" category (7 percent each),
    followed by Latin America (6 percent), Eastern and Western Europe (4
    percent each), and Asia (1 percent)."

    http://www.healthfinder.gov/news/newsstory.asp?docID=512510

    Bottom line: there are OVER THREE TIMES more "severely obese"
    people in the US (13%) than in Europe (4%.)
     
    Paolo Pizzi, Mar 4, 2004
    #12
  13. Simone Kerby

    Diabolik Guest

    "Ron Hunter" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > > "Simone Kerby" <> wrote in message
    > > news:4046C770.6723.1DCF0FD@localhost...
    > >
    > >>AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    > >>
    > >>In general, which offers a more healthy diet?

    > >
    > >
    > > Neither, the use of available food is an individual
    > > choice/obession/decision. You can become just as healther or unhealthy

    as
    > > your taste and eating habits allow.
    > >
    > > Dimitri
    > >
    > > <snip>
    > >
    > >

    > Quite true. ON my visit to Europe, I saw quite as many obese, often
    > grossly obese, people as I see here in the US.


    Which country?
     
    Diabolik, Mar 4, 2004
    #13
  14. Simone Kerby

    Diabolik Guest

    > So Diabolik does that mean you like Ronald McDonald?.

    Yes, I like the clown.
    I'm glad you understood ;)
     
    Diabolik, Mar 4, 2004
    #14
  15. Simone Kerby

    Neil Denton Guest

    "Gregory Morrow" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Simone Kerby" <> wrote in message

    news:<4046C770.6723.1DCF0FD@localhost>...
    > > AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    > >
    > > In general, which offers a more healthy diet?
    > >
    > > Americans tend toward fast foods, either take-out
    > > or home cooking that does not take too much time
    > > to prepare.
    > >
    > > In Europe, people still spend hours over a hot stove.
    > > People still stop at the market on the way home from
    > > work instead of weekly or monthly shopping as in
    > > North America.

    >
    >
    > Interesting...I've read that France is McDonald's single most
    > profitable market outside of the US. IIRC there is a French chain
    > that offers nothing but frozen food for sale...and it's very, very
    > popular.
    >
    > Many people in Europe shop just like Americans - in bulk and at huge
    > supermarkets, which in Europe are called "hypermarkets" (the
    > hypermarket being a French invention). They drive their cars to the
    > Tescos or whatever that litter the outskirts of most European cities
    > of any size - it's the same from Newcastle to Krakow to Palermo to
    > Oslo. Growth of this kind of shopping has been especially rapid in
    > the former Eastern Bloc states....
    >
    > Here in Chicago I shop just like an "old - fashioned" European - I
    > shop several times a week at smaller stores for my vittles. Don't
    > have a car, so I don't drive to Costco or wherever to shop, I walk or
    > take the bus. There are a lot of us like that here ;-)
    >
    > US - style fast food has established healthy footholds all over
    > Europe, from Paris and Rome to provincial Russia and other former
    > Communist states. Some of these firms are US, some of them are home -
    > grown e.g. in Germany you can find "Schnell Imbiss" outlets
    > everywhere, and there is a chain in Russia that offers "home - style"
    > Russian food fast and cheap. They mostly use the same marketing ploys
    > and technologies as McDo's, etc. Pizza is a very popular fast food
    > both in the States and everywhere in Europe - is this a "US" or
    > "European" phenomenon...???
    >
    >
    > >
    > > What are your favorite American dishes?
    > >
    > > What are your favorite European dishes?
    > >
    > > What are your thoughts on the difference in these 2
    > > styles of cuisine?

    >
    >
    > There is increasingly a "world cuisine" that comprises stuff like Tex
    > - Mex, Asian (stir fry and sushi) hamburgers, Italian, fish and chips,
    > and many other things. In pretty much any city of any size all over
    > the world these "cuisines" are readily available. You can great sushi
    > in Vladivostok and pretty good Singapore noodles in St. Paul and
    > decent hamburgers in Kathmandu and tolerable pizza in Havana and and
    > fajitas and margaritas in Bangalore and Southern BBQ in London and
    > quiche in Beirut...etcetera, etcetera, etcetera....
    >
    > And what about those "Irish" pubs that are ubiquitous absolutely
    > everywhere? Those are big world - wide chain operations, not the
    > result of some disgruntled Irish ex - pat wanting to open up a wee bit
    > 'o the old sod at the airport in Osaka or in downtown Santiago....
    >
    > I declare your questions as to preferences, then, as moot :)
    >
    > --
    > Best
    > Greg


    I don't know the stats for Europe, but I heard reported that in North
    America (I assume USA and Canada were actually included), 75% of restaurant
    meals consumed involve a burger, and 95% involve fries....which is not to
    say that you can't find fabulous, healthy food in pretty much any
    reasonable-size city in those two countries, just that most people prefer
    burgers and fries.
     
    Neil Denton, Mar 4, 2004
    #15
  16. Simone Kerby

    zbzbzb Guest

    >> Quite true. ON my visit to Europe, I saw quite as many
    >> obese, often grossly obese, people as I see here in the US.

    >
    >Judging by your blatant lies, I'd say you are a Republican.
    >
    >For anyone else, here's some SCIENTIFIC facts, from a
    >reputable US source:
    >
    >"The study authors discovered this country had the highest rates of obese
    >(24 percent) and very obese (13 percent) people and the lowest rates of
    >normal (22 percent) people. Asia had the highest rate of normal-weight
    >individuals (58 percent), Western Europe came next (31 percent), followed
    >by Eastern Europe (29 percent), Latin America (28 percent), Australia/New
    >Zealand (26 percent), and Canada (23 percent). Australia/New Zealand and
    >Canada tied for second place in the "very obese" category (7 percent each),
    >followed by Latin America (6 percent), Eastern and Western Europe (4
    >percent each), and Asia (1 percent)."
    >
    >http://www.healthfinder.gov/news/newsstory.asp?docID=512510
    >
    >Bottom line: there are OVER THREE TIMES more "severely obese"
    >people in the US (13%) than in Europe (4%.)



    Why not comapre individual European countries. After all
    Europe isn't a country. If you compare individual countries the results would
    start showing the same trends as in the US. The UK being a perfect example.
     
    zbzbzb, Mar 4, 2004
    #16
  17. Simone Kerby

    zbzbzb Guest

    >I don't know the stats for Europe, but I heard reported that in North
    >America (I assume USA and Canada were actually included), 75% of restaurant
    >meals consumed involve a burger, and 95% involve fries....which is not to
    >say that you can't find fabulous, healthy food in pretty much any
    >reasonable-size city in those two countries, just that most people prefer
    >burgers and fries.


    That's ridiculous.
     
    zbzbzb, Mar 4, 2004
    #17
  18. Simone Kerby

    Dave Smith Guest

    Ron Hunter wrote:

    >
    > >>AMERICAN FOOD vs EUROPEAN FOOD
    > >>
    > >>In general, which offers a more healthy diet?

    > >
    > >
    > > Neither, the use of available food is an individual
    > > choice/obession/decision. You can become just as healther or unhealthy as
    > > your taste and eating habits allow.
    > >
    > > Dimitri
    > >
    > > <snip>
    > >
    > >

    > Quite true. ON my visit to Europe, I saw quite as many obese, often
    > grossly obese, people as I see here in the US.


    ?? I suppose that things my vary from one country to the next. I have been to
    Europe three times, visiting Denmark, Germany, France, Belgium, Netherlands and
    Italy. I didn't see many fat people, except those who were carrying cameras.
     
    Dave Smith, Mar 4, 2004
    #18
  19. Simone Kerby

    Bob Myers Guest

    "Paolo Pizzi" <> wrote in message
    news:GcO1c.33701$...

    > Bottom line: there are OVER THREE TIMES more "severely obese"
    > people in the US (13%) than in Europe (4%.)


    But be very careful, as the old saw says, from confusing
    correlation with causation. These numbers don't necessarily
    mean that there is anything unique to the U.S. culture, or that
    there is a particular "American food," that causes this. These
    are POSSIBLE explanations, not conclusively shown from these
    results. One other POSSIBLE explanation is that many Americans
    enjoy a higher disposable income than those in other areas, and so
    spend more time eating out. An earlier poster made the point
    that there is certainly just as much "bad" food AVAILABLE
    elsewhere - and it's not all McDonald's and similar American
    exports; some of the worst examples I've seen in Europe were
    "home-grown" burger chains. Keep in mind that, for example,
    in China, going out to McDonald's or some such is considered
    a relatively rare treat!

    Bob M.
     
    Bob Myers, Mar 4, 2004
    #19
  20. Simone Kerby

    Diabolik Guest

    "Bob Myers" <> wrote in message
    news:hnP1c.269$...
    >
    > "Paolo Pizzi" <> wrote in message
    > news:GcO1c.33701$...
    >
    > > Bottom line: there are OVER THREE TIMES more "severely obese"
    > > people in the US (13%) than in Europe (4%.)

    >
    > But be very careful, as the old saw says, from confusing
    > correlation with causation. These numbers don't necessarily
    > mean that there is anything unique to the U.S. culture, or that
    > there is a particular "American food," that causes this. These
    > are POSSIBLE explanations, not conclusively shown from these
    > results. One other POSSIBLE explanation is that many Americans
    > enjoy a higher disposable income than those in other areas, and so
    > spend more time eating out.


    Many Italians also enjoy a high disposable income, and they also eat out.

    The difference is the quality of food and the lifestyle.


    > An earlier poster made the point
    > that there is certainly just as much "bad" food AVAILABLE
    > elsewhere - and it's not all McDonald's and similar American
    > exports;


    I don't see as much bad food in Italy.


    > some of the worst examples I've seen in Europe were
    > "home-grown" burger chains. Keep in mind that, for example,
    > in China, going out to McDonald's or some such is considered
    > a relatively rare treat!
    >
    > Bob M.
    >
    >
     
    Diabolik, Mar 5, 2004
    #20
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