AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by carrera d'olbani, Jul 3, 2007.

  1. I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the
    message saying that "the game requires at least a 2.2 GHz processor,
    and this processor is 1.9 GHz. Continue anyway ?".

    So, my question is: does the game utilize the second core (and how do
    I know if it does) ? And generally, how do I know if the rpogram/
    computer is using the second core ?
     
    carrera d'olbani, Jul 3, 2007
    #1
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  2. carrera d'olbani wrote:
    > I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    > processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the
    > message saying that "the game requires at least a 2.2 GHz processor,
    > and this processor is 1.9 GHz. Continue anyway ?".
    >
    > So, my question is: does the game utilize the second core (and how do
    > I know if it does) ? And generally, how do I know if the rpogram/
    > computer is using the second core ?


    The company that puts out Half Life said they'll be supporting dual core
    in Half Life 2: Episode Two. The software has to be aware of dual cores,
    otherwise it goes to waste.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Jul 3, 2007
    #2
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  3. Rôgêr wrote:
    > carrera d'olbani wrote:
    >
    >> I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    >> processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the
    >> message saying that "the game requires at least a 2.2 GHz processor,
    >> and this processor is 1.9 GHz. Continue anyway ?".
    >>
    >> So, my question is: does the game utilize the second core (and how do
    >> I know if it does) ? And generally, how do I know if the rpogram/
    >> computer is using the second core ?

    >
    >
    > The company that puts out Half Life said they'll be supporting dual core
    > in Half Life 2: Episode Two. The software has to be aware of dual cores,
    > otherwise it goes to waste.


    Now you answer my question just before this one.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Jul 3, 2007
    #3
  4. carrera d'olbani

    Shawk Guest

    carrera d'olbani wrote:
    > I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    > processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the
    > message saying that "the game requires at least a 2.2 GHz processor,
    > and this processor is 1.9 GHz. Continue anyway ?".
    >
    > So, my question is: does the game utilize the second core (and how do
    > I know if it does) ? And generally, how do I know if the rpogram/
    > computer is using the second core ?



    Simplistic answer - go into Task Manager/Performance and see if there
    are two small screens for CPU Usage History. If so your two cores are
    recognised and are being used. If you are using two screens drag Task
    Manager to the second (non-gaming) screen and play HL2 - see how the
    load is being distributed (or not)

    Probably much cleverer ways of doing what you want but its a decent start...
     
    Shawk, Jul 3, 2007
    #4
  5. Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    On Jul 3, 8:15 pm, Shawk <.3guesses> wrote:
    > carrera d'olbani wrote:
    > > I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    > > processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the
    > > message saying that "the game requires at least a 2.2 GHz processor,
    > > and this processor is 1.9 GHz. Continue anyway ?".

    >
    > > So, my question is: does the game utilize the second core (and how do
    > > I know if it does) ? And generally, how do I know if the rpogram/
    > > computer is using the second core ?

    >
    > Simplistic answer - go into Task Manager/Performance and see if there
    > are two small screens for CPU Usage History. If so your two cores are
    > recognised and are being used. If you are using two screens drag Task
    > Manager to the second (non-gaming) screen and play HL2 - see how the
    > load is being distributed (or not)
    >
    > Probably much cleverer ways of doing what you want but its a decent start...


    Thanks, Shawk ! I did what you prescribed. Indeed, there are two
    screens in the CPU performance section of the Windows Task Manager.
    Both of them show activity, one slightly more than the other. When
    playing Half-Life 2 DM, the CPU was utilised about 50% (I presume this
    is for both cores). It was probably good idea, after all, to ge a dual-
    core processor instead of single-core processor.
     
    carrera d'olbani, Jul 3, 2007
    #5
  6. carrera d'olbani

    Conor Guest

    Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    In article <>,
    carrera d'olbani says...

    > Thanks, Shawk ! I did what you prescribed. Indeed, there are two
    > screens in the CPU performance section of the Windows Task Manager.
    > Both of them show activity, one slightly more than the other. When
    > playing Half-Life 2 DM, the CPU was utilised about 50% (I presume this
    > is for both cores). It was probably good idea, after all, to ge a dual-
    > core processor instead of single-core processor.
    >

    No, the 50% will be for one core. You need the application and the OS
    to support SMP. HL2 doesn't.


    --
    Conor

    Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright
    until you hear them speak.........
     
    Conor, Jul 3, 2007
    #6
  7. carrera d'olbani

    Sleepy Guest

    "carrera d'olbani" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    > processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the
    > message saying that "the game requires at least a 2.2 GHz processor,
    > and this processor is 1.9 GHz. Continue anyway ?".
    >
    > So, my question is: does the game utilize the second core (and how do
    > I know if it does) ? And generally, how do I know if the rpogram/
    > computer is using the second core ?
    >


    that 3600+ is a performance rating - i.e. even though the CPU runs at 1.9ghz
    it performs like a 3.6ghz CPU so its more than adequate. the Source engine
    that HL2 uses doesn't currently use dual-core CPUs properly but that will
    change later this year. Valve have promised to release an update when HL2
    Episode 2 is released that will add proper dual-core functionality to the
    game engine.
     
    Sleepy, Jul 3, 2007
    #7
  8. Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    On Jul 3, 10:09 pm, "Sleepy" <> wrote:

    > that 3600+ is a performance rating - i.e. even though the CPU runs at 1.9ghz
    > it performs like a 3.6ghz CPU so its more than adequate.


    It occurs to me that each core (processor) runs at a speed of 1.9 GHz
    (just like what the game detected). When the two cores run an
    application together, their performance is equivalent to the
    performance of a single-core processor with a speed of roughly 1.9 GHz
    + 1.9 GHz, which is 3.8 GHz. This is where the performance rating 3600
    (kHz) is derived from.

    So, you are saying that Half-Life 2 does not utilize the two-core
    architecture well ? Essentially, your saying means that only one core
    (processor) is running the application, i.e. a 1.9 GHz processor. This
    could be too slooow. Maybe this is an explanation why the game feels
    too slow sometimes, compared with using my previous single-processor
    computer (even if I put the image quality settings on minimum).

    So, the question is: should I have gotten (in general) a dual-core
    processor for my new gaming PC, or a single-core one ??
     
    carrera d'olbani, Jul 3, 2007
    #8
  9. carrera d'olbani

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    carrera d'olbani wrote:
    > On Jul 3, 10:09 pm, "Sleepy" <> wrote:
    >
    >> that 3600+ is a performance rating - i.e. even though the CPU runs at 1.9ghz
    >> it performs like a 3.6ghz CPU so its more than adequate.

    >
    > It occurs to me that each core (processor) runs at a speed of 1.9 GHz
    > (just like what the game detected). When the two cores run an
    > application together, their performance is equivalent to the
    > performance of a single-core processor with a speed of roughly 1.9 GHz
    > + 1.9 GHz, which is 3.8 GHz. This is where the performance rating 3600
    > (kHz) is derived from.
    >


    No, that is not the way it works. AMD claim that the rating is the
    speed compared to their older Athlon CPUs, and come about because the
    newer ones run more efficiently than the older. (IOW, they are saying
    the new 1.9 GHz with more efficient architecture is equivalent to the
    older Athlon running at 3600.

    snipped

    --
    Cheers
    Oldus Fartus
     
    Oldus Fartus, Jul 3, 2007
    #9
  10. carrera d'olbani

    John Weiss Guest

    Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    "carrera d'olbani" <> wrote...
    >
    > It occurs to me that each core (processor) runs at a speed of 1.9 GHz
    > (just like what the game detected). When the two cores run an
    > application together, their performance is equivalent to the
    > performance of a single-core processor with a speed of roughly 1.9 GHz
    > + 1.9 GHz, which is 3.8 GHz. This is where the performance rating 3600
    > (kHz) is derived from.


    No.

    The AMD CPU architecture is significantly different, and more efficient, than
    the old Pentium 4 architecture. The 1.9 GHz AMD is equivalent to an old P4
    running at 3.6 GHz, according to AMD's estimates. THAT is the source of the
    "3600" designation.

    FWIW, the new Intel "core" (as in Core2Duo) architecture is also of a more
    efficient variety, so their clock speeds have come down significantly from the
    P4 as well.


    > So, you are saying that Half-Life 2 does not utilize the two-core
    > architecture well ? Essentially, your saying means that only one core
    > (processor) is running the application, i.e. a 1.9 GHz processor. This
    > could be too slooow. Maybe this is an explanation why the game feels
    > too slow sometimes, compared with using my previous single-processor
    > computer (even if I put the image quality settings on minimum).


    What was your old computer? What background apps was it running, compared with
    the new one?

    Game performance these days relies on the GPU as well as the CPU. Some parts
    of it may be tied to absolute CPU clock speed, while other aspects are tied
    more to GPU performance or memory bandwidth...

    While the game itself is only using 1 CPU core, the OS can shift other
    background tasks to the other core.


    > So, the question is: should I have gotten (in general) a dual-core
    > processor for my new gaming PC, or a single-core one ??


    The answer is "Maybe..."

    The Core2Extremes are arguably the best performing machines around. OTOH, if
    you're on a budget, you have to balance CPU, RAM, and GPU.

    If all you want to do is play a current-generation single-CPU-aware game, maybe
    a higher clock speed single-core CPU would have been better. For general use,
    though, dual-core CPUs have the edge.
     
    John Weiss, Jul 3, 2007
    #10
  11. carrera d'olbani

    Chris B. Guest

    Sleepy wrote:
    >
    >
    > "carrera d'olbani" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    >> processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the
    >> message saying that "the game requires at least a 2.2 GHz processor,
    >> and this processor is 1.9 GHz. Continue anyway ?".
    >>
    >> So, my question is: does the game utilize the second core (and how do
    >> I know if it does) ? And generally, how do I know if the rpogram/
    >> computer is using the second core ?
    >>

    >
    > that 3600+ is a performance rating - i.e. even though the CPU runs at
    > 1.9ghz it performs like a 3.6ghz CPU so its more than adequate. the
    > Source engine that HL2 uses doesn't currently use dual-core CPUs
    > properly but that will change later this year. Valve have promised to
    > release an update when HL2 Episode 2 is released that will add proper
    > dual-core functionality to the game engine.

    Uh, no.
     
    Chris B., Jul 3, 2007
    #11
  12. Chris B. wrote:
    > Sleepy wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> "carrera d'olbani" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>> I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    >>> processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the
    >>> message saying that "the game requires at least a 2.2 GHz processor,
    >>> and this processor is 1.9 GHz. Continue anyway ?".
    >>>
    >>> So, my question is: does the game utilize the second core (and how do
    >>> I know if it does) ? And generally, how do I know if the rpogram/
    >>> computer is using the second core ?
    >>>

    >>
    >> that 3600+ is a performance rating - i.e. even though the CPU runs at
    >> 1.9ghz it performs like a 3.6ghz CPU so its more than adequate. the
    >> Source engine that HL2 uses doesn't currently use dual-core CPUs
    >> properly but that will change later this year. Valve have promised to
    >> release an update when HL2 Episode 2 is released that will add proper
    >> dual-core functionality to the game engine.

    >
    > Uh, no.


    An extraordinarily good comeback. Bravo. Encore! Encore!
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Jul 3, 2007
    #12
  13. carrera d'olbani

    pc games Guest

    Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    On Jul 3, 10:53 am, carrera d'olbani <> wrote:

    > I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    > processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the


    Hey STEAM LOVER, CRAP STEAM INFECTED HL2 in not the only Game made for
    the PC!
    Don't you ever play anything else MORON?

    And btw stop CROSSPOSTING your CRAP STEAM INFECTED posts to others
    groups!
    Your STEAM ORGY! ORGY! ORGY! BELONGS ONLY TO ALT.GAMES.HALF-LIFE!
     
    pc games, Jul 4, 2007
    #13
  14. carrera d'olbani

    Shawk Guest

    Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    pc games wrote:
    > On Jul 3, 10:53 am, carrera d'olbani <> wrote:
    >
    >> I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    >> processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the

    >
    > Hey STEAM LOVER, CRAP STEAM INFECTED HL2 in not the only Game made for
    > the PC!
    > Don't you ever play anything else MORON?
    >
    > And btw stop CROSSPOSTING your CRAP STEAM INFECTED posts to others
    > groups!
    > Your STEAM ORGY! ORGY! ORGY! BELONGS ONLY TO ALT.GAMES.HALF-LIFE!



    Pot, kettle, moron
     
    Shawk, Jul 4, 2007
    #14
  15. carrera d'olbani

    Rob Guest

    Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    On Wed, 04 Jul 2007 09:53:40 +0100, Shawk <.3guesses>
    wrote:

    >pc games wrote:
    >> On Jul 3, 10:53 am, carrera d'olbani <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I installed the game Half Life 2 into my new PC with a double-core
    >>> processor AMD 64 X2, 3600+. When I am starting the game, I get the

    >>
    >> Hey STEAM LOVER, CRAP STEAM INFECTED HL2 in not the only Game made for
    >> the PC!
    >> Don't you ever play anything else MORON?
    >>
    >> And btw stop CROSSPOSTING your CRAP STEAM INFECTED posts to others
    >> groups!
    >> Your STEAM ORGY! ORGY! ORGY! BELONGS ONLY TO ALT.GAMES.HALF-LIFE!

    >
    >
    >Pot, kettle, moron


    You can tell it's getting round to "that time of the month" can't you?

    --
    Rob
     
    Rob, Jul 4, 2007
    #15
  16. carrera d'olbani

    Jon Danniken Guest

    Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    "John Weiss" wrote:
    > "carrera d'olbani" wrote...
    >
    >> So, the question is: should I have gotten (in general) a dual-core
    >> processor for my new gaming PC, or a single-core one ??

    >
    > The answer is "Maybe..."
    >
    > The Core2Extremes are arguably the best performing machines around. OTOH,
    > if you're on a budget, you have to balance CPU, RAM, and GPU.
    >
    > If all you want to do is play a current-generation single-CPU-aware game,
    > maybe a higher clock speed single-core CPU would have been better. For
    > general use, though, dual-core CPUs have the edge.


    Yep. I'm using a single chip (AMD64 3700+), and it handles all of the
    latest games without a problem (even ET:QW). Eventually, games will
    actively use the second core (physics and whatnot), but until something
    comes of that, and in a game that I am actually interested in, I'm sticking
    to my single core.

    Jon
     
    Jon Danniken, Jul 4, 2007
    #16
  17. Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    On Jul 5, 2:50 am, "Jon Danniken" <>
    wrote:
    > "John Weiss" wrote:
    > > "carrera d'olbani" wrote...

    >
    > >> So, the question is: should I have gotten (in general) a dual-core
    > >> processor for my new gaming PC, or a single-core one ??

    >
    > > The answer is "Maybe..."

    >
    > > The Core2Extremes are arguably the best performing machines around. OTOH,
    > > if you're on a budget, you have to balance CPU, RAM, and GPU.

    >
    > > If all you want to do is play a current-generation single-CPU-aware game,
    > > maybe a higher clock speed single-core CPU would have been better. For
    > > general use, though, dual-core CPUs have the edge.

    >
    > Yep. I'm using a single chip (AMD64 3700+), and it handles all of the
    > latest games without a problem (even ET:QW). Eventually, games will
    > actively use the second core (physics and whatnot), but until something
    > comes of that, and in a game that I am actually interested in, I'm sticking
    > to my single core.


    I feel the advantage of double core is that the switching between the
    running programs occurs more smoothly (e.g. switching between the
    running game and the windows desktop). This is a whole new experience.
    With all the other "houskeeping" tasks redistributed by Windows to the
    second core, the first core can concentrate entirely on running the
    game (I presume), and the 1.9 GHz processor can be equvalent to 3 GHz,
    which is already good.

    I noticed that the players of Half-Life 2 (and of other Steam-
    distributed games) have a quarter of their machines with dual cores,
    http://www.steampowered.com/status/survey.html
     
    carrera d'olbani, Jul 5, 2007
    #17
  18. carrera d'olbani

    Sleepy Guest

    Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    "carrera d'olbani" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Jul 3, 10:09 pm, "Sleepy" <> wrote:
    >
    >> that 3600+ is a performance rating - i.e. even though the CPU runs at
    >> 1.9ghz
    >> it performs like a 3.6ghz CPU so its more than adequate.

    >
    > It occurs to me that each core (processor) runs at a speed of 1.9 GHz
    > (just like what the game detected). When the two cores run an
    > application together, their performance is equivalent to the
    > performance of a single-core processor with a speed of roughly 1.9 GHz
    > + 1.9 GHz, which is 3.8 GHz. This is where the performance rating 3600
    > (kHz) is derived from.
    >
    > So, you are saying that Half-Life 2 does not utilize the two-core
    > architecture well ? Essentially, your saying means that only one core
    > (processor) is running the application, i.e. a 1.9 GHz processor. This
    > could be too slooow. Maybe this is an explanation why the game feels
    > too slow sometimes, compared with using my previous single-processor
    > computer (even if I put the image quality settings on minimum).
    >
    > So, the question is: should I have gotten (in general) a dual-core
    > processor for my new gaming PC, or a single-core one ??
    >


    dual-core is *definitely* the way to go so you made the right choice - no
    question about it.

    HL2 currently doesnt utilize multicore CPUs well but that will change in a
    month or two.

    Valve are working on adding *hybrid threading* to the source engine which
    will make good use of both cores.

    Most games that currently support multicores only use coarse threading -
    offloading one or two functions to the 2nd core. ie the 1st core does the
    rendering of graphics (90% of the work) and the 2nd core does physics and
    sound (10%) - in this case you only get a 10% boost in performance at best.
    Valves' hybrid threading approach will yield a much better increase than
    that.

    whats the rest of your system? what RAM and graphics card do you have?
     
    Sleepy, Jul 5, 2007
    #18
  19. carrera d'olbani

    Sleepy Guest

    Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    "Jon Danniken" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "John Weiss" wrote:
    >> "carrera d'olbani" wrote...
    >>
    >>> So, the question is: should I have gotten (in general) a dual-core
    >>> processor for my new gaming PC, or a single-core one ??

    >>
    >> The answer is "Maybe..."
    >>
    >> The Core2Extremes are arguably the best performing machines around.
    >> OTOH, if you're on a budget, you have to balance CPU, RAM, and GPU.
    >>
    >> If all you want to do is play a current-generation single-CPU-aware game,
    >> maybe a higher clock speed single-core CPU would have been better. For
    >> general use, though, dual-core CPUs have the edge.

    >
    > Yep. I'm using a single chip (AMD64 3700+), and it handles all of the
    > latest games without a problem (even ET:QW). Eventually, games will
    > actively use the second core (physics and whatnot), but until something
    > comes of that, and in a game that I am actually interested in, I'm
    > sticking to my single core.
    >
    > Jon
    >


    I recently went from a AMD64 3700 (san diego with 1mb L2cache) to a x2 3800
    (socket9390 and games performance is about the same atm. Windows
    multitasking is however a whole lot better and worth going to dual-core for
    all on its own IMHO.

    The only ppl so far to add *real* dual-core support to their engine is ID
    and latest patches for Doom 3 and Quake 4 add a significant performance
    boost.
    http://www.firingsquad.com/hardware/quake_4_dual-core_performance/page4.asp
    that should work for ET:QW too of course.

    I play DOD:Source myself so Im looking forward to the hyrbid threading patch
    that should be out soon.
     
    Sleepy, Jul 5, 2007
    #19
  20. carrera d'olbani

    spodosaurus Guest

    Re: AMD X2: is the 2nd core used -- how do I know ??

    carrera d'olbani wrote:
    > On Jul 3, 10:09 pm, "Sleepy" <> wrote:
    >
    >> that 3600+ is a performance rating - i.e. even though the CPU runs at 1.9ghz
    >> it performs like a 3.6ghz CPU so its more than adequate.

    >
    > It occurs to me that each core (processor) runs at a speed of 1.9 GHz
    > (just like what the game detected). When the two cores run an
    > application together, their performance is equivalent to the
    > performance of a single-core processor with a speed of roughly 1.9 GHz
    > + 1.9 GHz, which is 3.8 GHz. This is where the performance rating 3600
    > (kHz) is derived from.
    >


    That'd be MHz, and no, it's not where the performance rating is derived
    from. It's quite an easy matter to google this.

    > So, you are saying that Half-Life 2 does not utilize the two-core
    > architecture well ?


    No, he's saying it doesn't utilise it at all. It's written to use a
    single core/single CPU, and that's all it will use.

    > Essentially, your saying means that only one core
    > (processor) is running the application, i.e. a 1.9 GHz processor.


    Only one core is running the application, yes.

    > This
    > could be too slooow.


    You really need to do some reading as to what the 3600+ really means.
    It'll explain to you why you may be in error here, too. Speed in GHz is
    no longer a valid measure of CPU performance. CPUs are changing, and the
    refinements in how they work are what is brining performance up more
    than just raw speed. Use benchmarks to compare CPUs now, not GHz.

    > Maybe this is an explanation why the game feels
    > too slow sometimes, compared with using my previous single-processor
    > computer (even if I put the image quality settings on minimum).


    Have a look at how your new CPU compares to your old CPU in gaming
    benchmarks. There are too many other factors, such as RAM type and
    speed, motherboard, etc, to make the conclusion you're heading towards.

    Regards,

    Ari

    --
    spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply
    Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant. Please
    volunteer to be a marrow donor and literally save someone's life:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
     
    spodosaurus, Jul 6, 2007
    #20
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