AMD part numbers...

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by M. Murcek, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. M. Murcek

    M. Murcek Guest

    What are the designators for the dual core Athlon 64s? What socket do they
    use?
     
    M. Murcek, Jun 29, 2005
    #1
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  2. Andre Da Costa [Extended64], Jun 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. M. Murcek

    M. Murcek Guest

    Thanks, Andre...

    "M. Murcek" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What are the designators for the dual core Athlon 64s? What socket do
    > they use?
    >
     
    M. Murcek, Jun 29, 2005
    #3
  4. M. Murcek

    Rick Guest

    M. Murcek wrote:
    > What are the designators for the dual core Athlon 64s? What socket do they
    > use?
    >
    >


    From www.PriceWatch.com

    $1049 - Athlon 64 X2 4800
    $820 - Athlon 64 X2 4600
    $661 - Athlon 64 X2 4400
    $540 - Athlon 64 X2 4200

    They all use socket 939.
     
    Rick, Jun 29, 2005
    #4
  5. Andre Da Costa [Extended64], Jun 29, 2005
    #5
  6. M. Murcek

    M. Murcek Guest

    Thanks also to you, Rick...

    "Rick" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > M. Murcek wrote:
    >> What are the designators for the dual core Athlon 64s? What socket do
    >> they use?

    >
    > From www.PriceWatch.com
    > $1049 - Athlon 64 X2 4800
    > $820 - Athlon 64 X2 4600
    > $661 - Athlon 64 X2 4400
    > $540 - Athlon 64 X2 4200
    >
    > They all use socket 939.
     
    M. Murcek, Jun 29, 2005
    #6
  7. Greetings, all.

    Those prize tags taken into consideration, plus the fact that the newest products develop faster,
    if one was to invest in a single dual-core today would it be smart to go for dual Opterons instead?
    (Or, indeed the new Athlon FX-57?)

    It just strikes me that for a fractionally more expensive MB, you'd get roughly the same performance
    and big savings on the proc's since the novelty of single-core can be expected to be rapidly fading.

    Any cooling differences between 'dual' vs. 'single-core'???

    Tony. . .


    "Rick" <> wrote in message news:...
    > M. Murcek wrote:
    >> What are the designators for the dual core Athlon 64s? What socket do they use?

    >
    > From www.PriceWatch.com
    > $1049 - Athlon 64 X2 4800
    > $820 - Athlon 64 X2 4600
    > $661 - Athlon 64 X2 4400
    > $540 - Athlon 64 X2 4200
    >
    > They all use socket 939.
     
    Tony Sperling, Jun 29, 2005
    #7
  8. M. Murcek

    Rick Guest

    You will have to decide whether the dual-core is worth the price based
    on your own circumstances. No one else can decide what is best for you.


    Tony Sperling wrote:
    > Greetings, all.
    >
    > Those prize tags taken into consideration, plus the fact that the newest products develop faster,
    > if one was to invest in a single dual-core today would it be smart to go for dual Opterons instead?
    > (Or, indeed the new Athlon FX-57?)
    >
    > It just strikes me that for a fractionally more expensive MB, you'd get roughly the same performance
    > and big savings on the proc's since the novelty of single-core can be expected to be rapidly fading.
    >
    > Any cooling differences between 'dual' vs. 'single-core'???
    >
    > Tony. . .
    >
    >
    > "Rick" <> wrote in message news:...
    >
    >>M. Murcek wrote:
    >>
    >>>What are the designators for the dual core Athlon 64s? What socket do they use?

    >>
    >>From www.PriceWatch.com
    >> $1049 - Athlon 64 X2 4800
    >>$820 - Athlon 64 X2 4600
    >>$661 - Athlon 64 X2 4400
    >>$540 - Athlon 64 X2 4200
    >>
    >>They all use socket 939.

    >
    >
    >
     
    Rick, Jun 29, 2005
    #8
  9. Tony Sperling wrote:

    > Those prize tags taken into consideration, plus the fact that the newest products develop faster,
    > if one was to invest in a single dual-core today would it be smart to go for dual Opterons instead?
    > (Or, indeed the new Athlon FX-57?)


    I think that is like comparing apples and oranges. A dual opteron is a
    Numa machine, with lots of supported (but expensive) memory, an amazing
    amount of computing power, but also higher licensing costs (many
    software packages are licensed per socket).

    The X2 on the other hand is a "drop in" replacement to get more power
    out of existing motherboards. Since it is new, I would be slightly
    sceptical about reliability, though...


    > It just strikes me that for a fractionally more expensive MB, you'd get roughly the same performance
    > and big savings on the proc's since the novelty of single-core can be expected to be rapidly fading.


    I agree. The dual opteron probably offers more bang for buck now, and
    but maybe the X2 will drop in price soon.

    Thomas
     
    Thomas Steffen, Jun 30, 2005
    #9
  10. Good thinking, Thomas.

    The reason for asking is I feel I painted myself into a corner with my current machine, as I was a fairly quick starter
    and got myself a 754 pin socket. No debate - I absolutely love the thing, it has served me well, but I would have chosen
    differently today. That's the eternal dilemma, I guess. So to tag along with something or other of the new stuff, I
    cannot upgrade the board. One choice will turn out to be smarter - only which one? In the end it won't matter, I will
    love whatever I decide to take home, but right now, ah-, the questions! The indecision! The torment!

    A nice day to you, though.

    Tony. . .


    "Thomas Steffen" <> wrote in message news:...
    > Tony Sperling wrote:
    >
    >> Those prize tags taken into consideration, plus the fact that the newest products develop faster,
    >> if one was to invest in a single dual-core today would it be smart to go for dual Opterons instead?
    >> (Or, indeed the new Athlon FX-57?)

    >
    > I think that is like comparing apples and oranges. A dual opteron is a Numa machine, with lots of supported (but
    > expensive) memory, an amazing amount of computing power, but also higher licensing costs (many software packages are
    > licensed per socket).
    >
    > The X2 on the other hand is a "drop in" replacement to get more power out of existing motherboards. Since it is new, I
    > would be slightly sceptical about reliability, though...
    >
    >
    >> It just strikes me that for a fractionally more expensive MB, you'd get roughly the same performance
    >> and big savings on the proc's since the novelty of single-core can be expected to be rapidly fading.

    >
    > I agree. The dual opteron probably offers more bang for buck now, and but maybe the X2 will drop in price soon.
    >
    > Thomas
     
    Tony Sperling, Jul 1, 2005
    #10
  11. At least with the 939 pin sockets you can change to dual core later with at
    most a BIOS update. The biggest sales point for me for x2 was the low power
    consumption (and a lot cooler system) to get the same performance as the
    high end single core chips.

    --
    Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
    (Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
    "Tony Sperling" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Good thinking, Thomas.
    >
    > The reason for asking is I feel I painted myself into a corner with my
    > current machine, as I was a fairly quick starter and got myself a 754 pin
    > socket. No debate - I absolutely love the thing, it has served me well,
    > but I would have chosen differently today. That's the eternal dilemma, I
    > guess. So to tag along with something or other of the new stuff, I cannot
    > upgrade the board. One choice will turn out to be smarter - only which
    > one? In the end it won't matter, I will love whatever I decide to take
    > home, but right now, ah-, the questions! The indecision! The torment!
    >
    > A nice day to you, though.
    >
    > Tony. . .
    >
    >
    > "Thomas Steffen" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Tony Sperling wrote:
    >>
    >>> Those prize tags taken into consideration, plus the fact that the newest
    >>> products develop faster,
    >>> if one was to invest in a single dual-core today would it be smart to go
    >>> for dual Opterons instead?
    >>> (Or, indeed the new Athlon FX-57?)

    >>
    >> I think that is like comparing apples and oranges. A dual opteron is a
    >> Numa machine, with lots of supported (but expensive) memory, an amazing
    >> amount of computing power, but also higher licensing costs (many software
    >> packages are licensed per socket).
    >>
    >> The X2 on the other hand is a "drop in" replacement to get more power out
    >> of existing motherboards. Since it is new, I would be slightly sceptical
    >> about reliability, though...
    >>
    >>
    >>> It just strikes me that for a fractionally more expensive MB, you'd get
    >>> roughly the same performance
    >>> and big savings on the proc's since the novelty of single-core can be
    >>> expected to be rapidly fading.

    >>
    >> I agree. The dual opteron probably offers more bang for buck now, and but
    >> maybe the X2 will drop in price soon.
    >>
    >> Thomas

    >
    >
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Jul 1, 2005
    #11
  12. Tony Sperling wrote:
    > The reason for asking is I feel I painted myself into a corner with my current machine, as I was a fairly quick starter
    > and got myself a 754 pin socket. No debate - I absolutely love the thing, it has served me well, but I would have chosen
    > differently today. That's the eternal dilemma, I guess.


    It sure is. You buy a computer, and before you have installed it, the
    technology is already outdated, and the next standard is "hype" :)
    I bought a combo board (754 and 939 socket), because it was the only
    affordable 939pin board at the beginning of the year. For the CPU, the
    different between the two was only minimal by that time, so I got 939.

    And of course I don't have the possibility of using more than 2 memory
    modules, PCIe, only two SATA links etc etc etc.

    > So to tag along with something or other of the new stuff, I
    > cannot upgrade the board. One choice will turn out to be smarter - only which one?


    I would wait. It seems like AMD has not quite decided whether to go
    939pin, 940pin mark I, 940pin mark II or something completely different.

    Although a dual opteron certainly has a high "coolness factor",
    whichever socket it uses. We have a sun 20z server at work, which
    definately has "it" :)

    Whatever you do: have fun with it and use it while it is still "up to date".

    Thomas
     
    Thomas Steffen, Jul 1, 2005
    #12
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