Albatrosses Yes, Penguins No

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Thirsty, Mar 17, 2006.

  1. Thirsty

    Thirsty Guest

    A CIO's perspective on the recent Linux conference in Dunedin
    http://www.cio.com.au/index.php/id;1404610049;fp;4;fpid;1854618785

    +++++

    Will Linux ever fly in the enterprie? I seriously doubt it

    We went to see the albatrosses in their sanctuary on the Otago Peninsula but
    we elected to miss out on the penguins. After all, there were enough of them
    in Dunedin at the time.

    You see, our holiday trip around the south island of New Zealand in January
    happened to coincide with the annual regional Linux conference. Everywhere
    you looked in Dunedin there seemed to be someone sporting a black T shirt
    with a penguin on it. I must admit that I found their earnest technological
    enthusiasm somewhat nauseating.

    To some this may seem a bit like heresy coming from me. For four years in
    the early 1990s I was heavily involved with the Unix International
    Australian Marketing Group. I was there in the trenches fighting for the
    cause of open systems. Back then we were the people who were going to do
    away with proprietary systems. We would bring down the behemoths of the ICT
    industry with their fat margins and vendor lock-in marketing strategies.
    Unix would open up the world to affordable, server-level computing.

    I suspect my current cynicism is perhaps a reflection of the painful lessons
    Unix devotees like me learned back then. In the end, what we thought was an
    advantage was in fact a huge negative. Unix's independence and source code
    availability actually resulted in a loss of control over the development of
    the operating system. Everyone ended up doing their own thing. The result
    was many hybrid versions of Unix, which meant there was never any certainty
    whether a program could or could not be ported to an alternative Unix
    environment. Even in its simplest form the goal of open systems proved
    elusive.

    When I look at Linux it seems another case of history repeating itself.
    Those devotees in Dunedin may think they are going to slay the Microsoft
    dragon, but I think that all they really do is highlight their own business
    naivety.

    As one senior Australian CIO told me just this week: "There are certain
    parts of my IT infrastructure that I don't want to spend even a second
    thinking about." I would bet London to a brick that desktop operating
    systems fall into that category. This CIO wants to spend his time making
    sure his counterparts in the business make better use of the IT resources
    they have already. He sees little value in pioneering at the desktop level,
    in the vain hope that this might slash some dollars off the IT bottom line.

    Unix did bring down the cost of mid-range computers, but I wonder whether
    this would have happened anyway. The increasing power of the desktop, the
    capabilities of the Internet and economic recessions all would've had an
    impact on the cost of mid-range computing. Similarly, I expect the cost of
    desktop software will fall as Microsoft finds its pre-eminence in that arena
    challenged by innovative suppliers such as Google.

    Perhaps the highlight of our trip to New Zealand was seeing several
    albatrosses fly. This is something of a rare occurrence for visitors to the
    sanctuary because it takes a bit of effort for an albatross to get airborne.
    However, when they do they become an aeronautical marvel. A bird that is
    capable of flying nearly 2000 kilometres in a single day.

    That's the sort of uncomplicated reliability and performance that CIOs want
    from their operating systems. They don't want penguins. Penguins can't fly.

    Peter Hind is a freelance consultant and commentator with nearly 25 years
    experience in the IT industry. He is co-author of The IT Manager's Survival
    Guide and ran the InTEP IS executive gatherings in Australia for over 10
    years.
    Thirsty, Mar 17, 2006
    #1
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  2. Thirsty

    Ron McNulty Guest

    Hi Thirsty

    He does seem a bit one-eyed, but also makes some good points.

    I work with both Linux and Windows (Developer and sometime administrator).
    If I was wanting a web server, not much will beat Apache on Linux. Contrary
    to his view, it will run forever with virtually no maintenance or security
    problems.

    Desktop is another story. Every time I have installed KDE or Gnome, I have
    found myself stuck in technical dead ends. (Can't locate drivers; monitors
    not properly supported; can't understand error messages; can't work out how
    to do something quite simple) So many of the Linux GUI apps work fine when
    they work, but put you back against the bare metal when there is a failure.
    I'm by no means a technical newbie, but setting up a Linux firewall was by
    not at all intuitive compared to XP (at least the last time I tried). And
    not everything is available for Linux yet - I use Sybase Power Designer and
    SQL Server as a major development tools - both Windows only. But the gap is
    narrowing (largely due to Open Office and Eclipse), and I suspect that
    within 5 years the gap will be almost closed.

    He also has a point about "customised" distros being sometimes to the
    detriment of adopting an OS. For instance I had to go read the book on cron
    jobs for RedHat recently. Similar to Unix, but not quite the same. In some
    ways, the playing field would be more level if one Linux distribution became
    the defacto standard.

    Regards

    Ron

    "Thirsty" <> wrote in message
    news:CssSf.6749$...
    >A CIO's perspective on the recent Linux conference in Dunedin
    >http://www.cio.com.au/index.php/id;1404610049;fp;4;fpid;1854618785
    >
    > +++++
    >
    > Will Linux ever fly in the enterprie? I seriously doubt it
    >
    > We went to see the albatrosses in their sanctuary on the Otago Peninsula
    > but we elected to miss out on the penguins. After all, there were enough
    > of them in Dunedin at the time.
    >
    > You see, our holiday trip around the south island of New Zealand in
    > January happened to coincide with the annual regional Linux conference.
    > Everywhere you looked in Dunedin there seemed to be someone sporting a
    > black T shirt with a penguin on it. I must admit that I found their
    > earnest technological enthusiasm somewhat nauseating.
    >
    > To some this may seem a bit like heresy coming from me. For four years in
    > the early 1990s I was heavily involved with the Unix International
    > Australian Marketing Group. I was there in the trenches fighting for the
    > cause of open systems. Back then we were the people who were going to do
    > away with proprietary systems. We would bring down the behemoths of the
    > ICT industry with their fat margins and vendor lock-in marketing
    > strategies. Unix would open up the world to affordable, server-level
    > computing.
    >
    > I suspect my current cynicism is perhaps a reflection of the painful
    > lessons Unix devotees like me learned back then. In the end, what we
    > thought was an advantage was in fact a huge negative. Unix's independence
    > and source code availability actually resulted in a loss of control over
    > the development of the operating system. Everyone ended up doing their own
    > thing. The result was many hybrid versions of Unix, which meant there was
    > never any certainty whether a program could or could not be ported to an
    > alternative Unix environment. Even in its simplest form the goal of open
    > systems proved elusive.
    >
    > When I look at Linux it seems another case of history repeating itself.
    > Those devotees in Dunedin may think they are going to slay the Microsoft
    > dragon, but I think that all they really do is highlight their own
    > business naivety.
    >
    > As one senior Australian CIO told me just this week: "There are certain
    > parts of my IT infrastructure that I don't want to spend even a second
    > thinking about." I would bet London to a brick that desktop operating
    > systems fall into that category. This CIO wants to spend his time making
    > sure his counterparts in the business make better use of the IT resources
    > they have already. He sees little value in pioneering at the desktop
    > level, in the vain hope that this might slash some dollars off the IT
    > bottom line.
    >
    > Unix did bring down the cost of mid-range computers, but I wonder whether
    > this would have happened anyway. The increasing power of the desktop, the
    > capabilities of the Internet and economic recessions all would've had an
    > impact on the cost of mid-range computing. Similarly, I expect the cost of
    > desktop software will fall as Microsoft finds its pre-eminence in that
    > arena challenged by innovative suppliers such as Google.
    >
    > Perhaps the highlight of our trip to New Zealand was seeing several
    > albatrosses fly. This is something of a rare occurrence for visitors to
    > the sanctuary because it takes a bit of effort for an albatross to get
    > airborne. However, when they do they become an aeronautical marvel. A bird
    > that is capable of flying nearly 2000 kilometres in a single day.
    >
    > That's the sort of uncomplicated reliability and performance that CIOs
    > want from their operating systems. They don't want penguins. Penguins
    > can't fly.
    >
    > Peter Hind is a freelance consultant and commentator with nearly 25 years
    > experience in the IT industry. He is co-author of The IT Manager's
    > Survival Guide and ran the InTEP IS executive gatherings in Australia for
    > over 10 years.
    >
    >
    >
    Ron McNulty, Mar 17, 2006
    #2
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  3. Thirsty

    shannon Guest

    shannon, Mar 17, 2006
    #3
  4. Thirsty

    shannon Guest

    Ron McNulty wrote:

    >
    > He also has a point about "customised" distros being sometimes to the
    > detriment of adopting an OS. For instance I had to go read the book on cron
    > jobs for RedHat recently. Similar to Unix, but not quite the same. In some
    > ways, the playing field would be more level if one Linux distribution became
    > the defacto standard.
    >


    cron is available for Windows, BSD, OSX, AIX, Linux and several other
    operating systems.

    Which one should become the defacto standard ?
    shannon, Mar 17, 2006
    #4
  5. Thirsty

    Stu Fleming Guest

    shannon wrote:

    > cron is available for Windows, BSD, OSX, AIX, Linux and several other
    > operating systems.
    >
    > Which one should become the defacto standard ?


    In NZ, if it has been installed for 2 years or more, it's defacto.
    And when you uninstall it, it takes half your files.
    Stu Fleming, Mar 18, 2006
    #5
  6. Thirsty

    Guest

    Stu Fleming wrote:
    > shannon wrote:
    >
    >> cron is available for Windows, BSD, OSX, AIX, Linux and several other
    >> operating systems.
    >>
    >> Which one should become the defacto standard ?

    >
    >
    > In NZ, if it has been installed for 2 years or more, it's defacto.
    > And when you uninstall it, it takes half your files.



    lol.....think its three though....unless you got a EULA, in which case
    its everything after 90 days....

    ;]

    regards

    Thing
    , Mar 18, 2006
    #6
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