Aged Film colour problem

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jasen, Nov 21, 2005.

  1. Jasen

    Jasen Guest

    I've got some slide images which I had taken on a film that I either did not
    realise was past its used-by date or that the processing of the film has
    caused a colour cast artefact. I assume the former is true.
    The colour cast appears as a gradation, more intense on the 35mm long edges
    and then tapering off towards the inner 1/3 of the image from top and bottom
    along the long edges of the film. (clear as mud huh?!) I've no real idea
    how to get rid of it after scanning the image digitally. I have Photoshop
    CS and am trying to figure out how to get rid of it as some of the shots are
    really good and look crap with this cast. I've tried replacing the colour
    but that just makes it worse. This one is a bit of a challange and I would
    appreciate any ideas you all may have. I am expecting that it'll be in the
    too hard basket in all practicality.

    regards,

    Jasen
     
    Jasen, Nov 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. Jasen

    bmoag Guest

    Can you take an image out of its mount to see if the cast is only on the
    imaged part of the film or extends to the film in between the exposures?
    If it is only on the exposed part you have a problem in your camera.
    It is also possible that an error in development with uneven exposure to
    chemicals caused this.
    Color changes in overaged films are usually global.
    If you can crop your images to eliminate as much of the artifact as possible
    and have the patience to clone, paint and adjust with sublayers you can
    probably salvage something.
     
    bmoag, Nov 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. Jasen

    Bill Hilton Guest

    >The colour cast appears as a gradation, more intense on the 35mm long edges
    >and then tapering off towards the inner 1/3 of the image from top and bottom
    >along the long edges of the film. (clear as mud huh?!)


    Posting an example should be worth 1,000 words ...

    >I have Photoshop CS and am trying to figure out how to get rid of it
    >as some of the shots are really good and look crap with this cast.


    Should be easy enough, just open a Curves adjustment layer and work on
    the section with the cast, ignoring the rest of the image. When you
    have the color cast corrected then draw a gradient on the adjustment
    layer layer mask, which will limit the changes to the area left white
    under the mask. You can usually tweak this gradient to match the blend
    of the gradient of the cast and all is well.

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Nov 21, 2005
    #3
  4. Jasen

    Jasen Guest

    "Bill Hilton" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >The colour cast appears as a gradation, more intense on the 35mm long
    > >edges
    >>and then tapering off towards the inner 1/3 of the image from top and
    >>bottom
    >>along the long edges of the film. (clear as mud huh?!)

    >
    > Posting an example should be worth 1,000 words ...
    >
    >>I have Photoshop CS and am trying to figure out how to get rid of it
    >>as some of the shots are really good and look crap with this cast.

    >
    > Should be easy enough, just open a Curves adjustment layer and work on
    > the section with the cast, ignoring the rest of the image. When you
    > have the color cast corrected then draw a gradient on the adjustment
    > layer layer mask, which will limit the changes to the area left white
    > under the mask. You can usually tweak this gradient to match the blend
    > of the gradient of the cast and all is well.
    >
    > Bill
    >


    It all sounds like a huge learning "curve" for me. Might give it a try when
    I get time.....
     
    Jasen, Nov 21, 2005
    #4
  5. Jasen

    Jasen Guest

    "bmoag" <> wrote in message
    news:Timgf.32178$...
    > Can you take an image out of its mount to see if the cast is only on the
    > imaged part of the film or extends to the film in between the exposures?
    > If it is only on the exposed part you have a problem in your camera.
    > It is also possible that an error in development with uneven exposure to
    > chemicals caused this.
    > Color changes in overaged films are usually global.
    > If you can crop your images to eliminate as much of the artifact as
    > possible and have the patience to clone, paint and adjust with sublayers
    > you can probably salvage something.
    >


    No, it's the film. Goes out past the image and another in-date film was
    fine.
     
    Jasen, Nov 21, 2005
    #5
  6. Jasen

    Tony Guest

    You can read how and/or follow along with Katrine Eisemann doing similar
    corrections in her book on retouching and restoring with Photoshop. I
    consider this an essential book for photographers working with computers.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html

    "Jasen" <> wrote in message
    news:2wsgf.10$...
    >
    > "Bill Hilton" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > >The colour cast appears as a gradation, more intense on the 35mm long
    > > >edges
    > >>and then tapering off towards the inner 1/3 of the image from top and
    > >>bottom
    > >>along the long edges of the film. (clear as mud huh?!)

    > >
    > > Posting an example should be worth 1,000 words ...
    > >
    > >>I have Photoshop CS and am trying to figure out how to get rid of it
    > >>as some of the shots are really good and look crap with this cast.

    > >
    > > Should be easy enough, just open a Curves adjustment layer and work on
    > > the section with the cast, ignoring the rest of the image. When you
    > > have the color cast corrected then draw a gradient on the adjustment
    > > layer layer mask, which will limit the changes to the area left white
    > > under the mask. You can usually tweak this gradient to match the blend
    > > of the gradient of the cast and all is well.
    > >
    > > Bill
    > >

    >
    > It all sounds like a huge learning "curve" for me. Might give it a try

    when
    > I get time.....
    >
    >
     
    Tony, Nov 22, 2005
    #6
  7. Jasen

    Jasen Guest

    Thanks Tony, I shall have a look at that.

    "Tony" <> wrote in message
    news:3Ttgf.2690$...
    > You can read how and/or follow along with Katrine Eisemann doing similar
    > corrections in her book on retouching and restoring with Photoshop. I
    > consider this an essential book for photographers working with computers.
    >
    > --
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    > home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    > The Improved Links Pages are at
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    > A sample chapter from "Haight-Ashbury" is at
    > http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
    >
    > "Jasen" <> wrote in message
    > news:2wsgf.10$...
    >>
    >> "Bill Hilton" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > >The colour cast appears as a gradation, more intense on the 35mm long
    >> > >edges
    >> >>and then tapering off towards the inner 1/3 of the image from top and
    >> >>bottom
    >> >>along the long edges of the film. (clear as mud huh?!)
    >> >
    >> > Posting an example should be worth 1,000 words ...
    >> >
    >> >>I have Photoshop CS and am trying to figure out how to get rid of it
    >> >>as some of the shots are really good and look crap with this cast.
    >> >
    >> > Should be easy enough, just open a Curves adjustment layer and work on
    >> > the section with the cast, ignoring the rest of the image. When you
    >> > have the color cast corrected then draw a gradient on the adjustment
    >> > layer layer mask, which will limit the changes to the area left white
    >> > under the mask. You can usually tweak this gradient to match the blend
    >> > of the gradient of the cast and all is well.
    >> >
    >> > Bill
    >> >

    >>
    >> It all sounds like a huge learning "curve" for me. Might give it a try

    > when
    >> I get time.....
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Jasen, Nov 22, 2005
    #7
  8. Jasen

    Bill Hilton Guest

    >> Tony writes ...
    >>
    >> You can read how and/or follow along with Katrine Eisemann doing
    >> similar corrections in her book


    > Jasen writes
    >
    >Thanks Tony, I shall have a look at that


    Probably easier to find her when the name is spelled correctly ...
    "Katrin Eismann" ... web site at http://www.digitalretouch.org/

    Or you could just post a sample pic and we could show you how to fix it
    in a few seconds ...

    Bill
     
    Bill Hilton, Nov 22, 2005
    #8
  9. Jasen

    Jasen Guest

    "Bill Hilton" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >>> Tony writes ...
    >>>
    >>> You can read how and/or follow along with Katrine Eisemann doing
    >>> similar corrections in her book

    >
    >> Jasen writes
    >>
    >>Thanks Tony, I shall have a look at that

    >
    > Probably easier to find her when the name is spelled correctly ...
    > "Katrin Eismann" ... web site at http://www.digitalretouch.org/
    >
    > Or you could just post a sample pic and we could show you how to fix it
    > in a few seconds ...
    >
    > Bill
    >


    Ok, I will have to fish it out and re-scan it as it seems I deleted it after
    giving up previously. DOH!
    I'll do attached to a new post some day soon when I get time.
    thanks for all your help.
     
    Jasen, Nov 22, 2005
    #9
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