After tera...what's next??...

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Jimchip, Mar 26, 2006.

  1. Jimchip

    Jimchip Guest

    On 2006-03-26, Collector <> wrote:
    > I have seen Dell advert a PC with terabytes...cool...
    >
    > But that will eventually wain...what's next??
    > Verabytes??...zerabytes??...


    http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/0,,sid9_gci499008,00.html
    "Kilo, mega, giga, tera, peta, and all that

    Also see Kibi, mebi, gibi, tebi, pebi, and all that, which are relatively new
    prefixes designed to express power-of-two multiples.

    Kilo, mega, giga, tera, and peta are among the list of prefixes that are used to
    denote the quantity of something, such as, in computing and telecommunications,
    a byte or a bit. Sometimes called prefix multipliers, these prefixes are also
    used in electronics and physics. Each multiplier consists of a one-letter
    abbreviation and the prefix that it stands for.

    In communications, electronics, and physics, multipliers are defined in powers
    of 10 from 10-24 to 1024, proceeding in increments of three orders of magnitude
    (103 or 1,000). In IT and data storage, multipliers are defined in powers of 2
    from 210 to 280, proceeding in increments of ten orders of magnitude (210 or
    1,024). These multipliers are denoted in the following table" ...

    note that the above doesn't have exponentials written correctly, although the
    url reference does look and show things correctly.

    > maybe back to the abacus...


    There's nothing 'wrong' with nor 'too old' with the abacus that would suggest
    your 'back to the abacus' statement has any validity in the context of the rest
    of your message.

    > peace


    --
    Is this where I give some sort of 'V' sign and say 'cool'?
    Jimchip, Mar 26, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jimchip

    Collector Guest

    I have seen Dell advert a PC with terabytes...cool...

    But that will eventually wain...what's next??
    Verabytes??...zerabytes??...

    maybe back to the abacus...

    peace
    Collector, Mar 26, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jimchip

    SgtMinor Guest

    SgtMinor, Mar 26, 2006
    #3
  4. Jimchip

    Mitch Guest

    In article <mwlVf.10192$>,
    Collector <> wrote:

    > I have seen Dell advert a PC with terabytes...cool...
    >
    > But that will eventually wain...what's next??
    > Verabytes??...zerabytes??...
    >
    > maybe back to the abacus...


    Abacus?
    Are you suggesting there is a reason we won't need increasing amounts
    of storage?

    Or are you suggesting that using a lot of storage is bringing us closer
    to a time when we give up technology entirely?
    What the basis for such an extreme implication?
    Mitch, Mar 26, 2006
    #4
  5. Collector wrote:
    > I have seen Dell advert a PC with terabytes...cool...
    >
    > But that will eventually wain...what's next??
    > Verabytes??...zerabytes??...
    >
    > maybe back to the abacus...
    >
    > peace
    >
    >


    You forgot Xena, don't forget Xena.
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Brian_H=B9=A9?=, Mar 26, 2006
    #5
  6. "Jimchip" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2006-03-26, Collector <> wrote:
    >> I have seen Dell advert a PC with terabytes...cool...
    >>
    >> But that will eventually wain...what's next??
    >> Verabytes??...zerabytes??...

    >
    > http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/0,,sid9_gci499008,00.html
    > "Kilo, mega, giga, tera, peta, and all that
    >
    > Also see Kibi, mebi, gibi, tebi, pebi, and all that, which are relatively
    > new
    > prefixes designed to express power-of-two multiples.
    >


    What about the Kiwi, Qupi (aka, Cupie), and Gigli?


    > Kilo, mega, giga, tera, and peta are among the list of prefixes that are
    > used to
    > denote the quantity of something, such as, in computing and
    > telecommunications,
    > a byte or a bit. Sometimes called prefix multipliers, these prefixes are
    > also
    > used in electronics and physics. Each multiplier consists of a one-letter
    > abbreviation and the prefix that it stands for.
    >
    > In communications, electronics, and physics, multipliers are defined in
    > powers
    > of 10 from 10-24 to 1024, proceeding in increments of three orders of
    > magnitude
    > (103 or 1,000). In IT and data storage, multipliers are defined in powers
    > of 2
    > from 210 to 280, proceeding in increments of ten orders of magnitude (210
    > or
    > 1,024). These multipliers are denoted in the following table" ...
    >
    > note that the above doesn't have exponentials written correctly, although
    > the
    > url reference does look and show things correctly.
    >
    >> maybe back to the abacus...

    >
    > There's nothing 'wrong' with nor 'too old' with the abacus that would
    > suggest
    > your 'back to the abacus' statement has any validity in the context of the
    > rest
    > of your message.
    >
    >> peace

    >
    > --
    > Is this where I give some sort of 'V' sign and say 'cool'?
    Atlas Shrugged, Mar 26, 2006
    #6
  7. Jimchip

    Scraggy Guest

    Collector wrote:
    > I have seen Dell advert a PC with terabytes...cool...
    >
    > But that will eventually wain...what's next??
    > Verabytes??...zerabytes??...
    >
    > maybe back to the abacus...
    >
    > peace


    Blinkybytes

    HTH

    --
    I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as
    members. Groucho Marx
    Scraggy, Mar 26, 2006
    #7
    1. Advertising

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