AE Lock

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Lionel, Oct 24, 2006.

  1. Lionel

    Lionel Guest

    Having just baught my first digital camera and spent quite a few hours
    getting used to its operation, there's just one function's reason I cannot
    understand and that's the advantages of using AE-L and under what
    circumstances one would use it.

    Please can you lighten my darkness!!

    Lionel
     
    Lionel, Oct 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. Lionel wrote:
    > Having just baught my first digital camera and spent quite a few hours
    > getting used to its operation, there's just one function's reason I
    > cannot understand and that's the advantages of using AE-L and under
    > what circumstances one would use it.
    >
    > Please can you lighten my darkness!!
    >
    > Lionel


    There are dozens of situations where AE lock would be useful. One of these
    is where the subject is backlit. The AE function could be fooled by the
    light coming into the lens, resulting in under exposure of the main subject.
    Take a close-up reading from say, the face, and hold that in AE-lock until
    you resume your position to take the shot, then press the shutter.
     
    Dennis Pogson, Oct 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. Lionel

    Leroy Guest

    When you need to recompose a shot.

    Lock exposure how you want the final exposure, then get the focus of the
    subject, then take the photo after re-composing.



    "Lionel" <lionel > wrote in message
    news:S9r%g.42687$...
    > Having just baught my first digital camera and spent quite a few hours
    > getting used to its operation, there's just one function's reason I cannot
    > understand and that's the advantages of using AE-L and under what
    > circumstances one would use it.
    >
    > Please can you lighten my darkness!!
    >
    > Lionel
    >
    >
    >
     
    Leroy, Oct 24, 2006
    #3
  4. Lionel

    Bucky Guest

    Dennis Pogson wrote:
    > There are dozens of situations where AE lock would be useful. One of these
    > is where the subject is backlit.


    a few more:

    * when you take photos that will be stitched together later, you want
    the AE lock
    * you want to expose for an object that is not in the center of the
    frame
    * if there are different levels of lighting in the scene and the camera
    is not choosing the right one.
     
    Bucky, Oct 24, 2006
    #4
  5. Lionel

    Lionel Guest

    Thanks to all who answered. The instruction book with the camera does not
    explain why one needs AE-L but your explanations certainly lightened my
    darkness.

    Cheers

    Lionel
     
    Lionel, Oct 25, 2006
    #5
  6. Lionel

    Guest

    Bucky wrote:
    > Dennis Pogson wrote:
    > > There are dozens of situations where AE lock would be useful. One of these
    > > is where the subject is backlit.

    >
    > a few more:
    >
    > * when you take photos that will be stitched together later, you want
    > the AE lock


    Yup.

    > * you want to expose for an object that is not in the center of the
    > frame
    > * if there are different levels of lighting in the scene and the camera
    > is not choosing the right one.


    Well, you *could* use AE lock for this, but that wouldn't make much
    sense. Most cameras will lock exposure and focus when you half-press
    the shutter button. So meter off your subject, half-press, recompose,
    and then fully press the shutter to take the picture. That's much
    easier than using the AE lock button. But the lock button is indeed
    needed when you want to take *multiple* pictures with exactly the same
    settings.

    -Gniewko
     
    , Oct 25, 2006
    #6
  7. Lionel

    ASAAR Guest

    On 25 Oct 2006 06:58:57 -0700, wrote:

    > Well, you *could* use AE lock for this, but that wouldn't make much
    > sense. Most cameras will lock exposure and focus when you half-press
    > the shutter button. So meter off your subject, half-press, recompose,
    > and then fully press the shutter to take the picture. That's much
    > easier than using the AE lock button. But the lock button is indeed
    > needed when you want to take *multiple* pictures with exactly the same
    > settings.


    It's a method that can be used, but it's not needed. One can
    always meter off the most appropriate subject, note the shutter
    speed and aperture, and then switch the camera to manual mode using
    either exactly the same exposure settings, or offset both by the
    same number of stops, retaining the same exposure. This would be
    much more convenient if you're ever using a borrowed camera, or a
    new camera that you're not completely familiar with that uses an
    obscure AE lock procedure. I doubt that there are any or many
    cameras that would require a peek in the manual to figure out how to
    switch to manual mode. It's assumed that the photographer would
    know how to adjust the aperture and shutter speed, but some cameras
    that use shared controls could make adjustments a little tricky for
    inexperienced photographers.
     
    ASAAR, Oct 25, 2006
    #7
  8. Lionel

    JC Dill Guest

    On Wed, 25 Oct 2006 10:37:59 GMT, "Lionel" <lionel >
    wrote:

    >The instruction book with the camera does not
    >explain why one needs AE-L


    The instruction book that comes with the camera is supposed to tell
    you how to use the various controls. Knowing *why* you want to use
    those controls is part of being a photographer. You might want to buy
    some books or take some courses on photography to further understand
    the whys that go into the multitude of choices one has when taking
    photos to get the outcome you desire from your camera.

    jc

    --

    "The nice thing about a mare is you get to ride a lot
    of different horses without having to own that many."
    ~ Eileen Morgan of The Mare's Nest, PA
     
    JC Dill, Oct 25, 2006
    #8
  9. Lionel

    Bucky Guest

    wrote:
    > Most cameras will lock exposure and focus when you half-press
    > the shutter button. That's much
    > easier than using the AE lock button. But the lock button is indeed
    > needed when you want to take *multiple* pictures with exactly the same
    > settings.


    good point.
     
    Bucky, Oct 25, 2006
    #9
  10. Lionel

    Bill Funk Guest

    On 25 Oct 2006 06:58:57 -0700, wrote:

    >Bucky wrote:
    >> Dennis Pogson wrote:
    >> > There are dozens of situations where AE lock would be useful. One of these
    >> > is where the subject is backlit.

    >>
    >> a few more:
    >>
    >> * when you take photos that will be stitched together later, you want
    >> the AE lock

    >
    >Yup.


    I'm sure that some stitching apps require this, but I've used
    Autostitch for a while now, and it's smart enough to handle shots
    where AEL isn't used.
    http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~mbrown/autostitch/autostitch.html
    It's free, too!
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Oct 25, 2006
    #10
  11. Lionel

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Wed, 25 Oct 2006 10:37:59 GMT, "Lionel" <lionel >
    wrote:

    >Thanks to all who answered. The instruction book with the camera does not
    >explain why one needs AE-L but your explanations certainly lightened my
    >darkness.
    >
    >Cheers
    >
    >Lionel
    >

    Cameras, like a host of other devices, come with manuals that tell you
    *how* to use the device, but not *why* to use it.
    For the why, there are a host of other books; for example, a microwave
    oven's manual will tell you how to use all of the various settings,
    but it's up to you to determine why you would want to use them. For
    that, there are microwave cookbooks.
    For cameras, there are a host of books that explain why you use
    certain settings. I strongly recommend that those who want to learn
    more about why you would use certain settings or techniques read a few
    of those "how to" photography books. Then, with practice, the
    photographer can use the various settings and techniques to get the
    picture that's intended.
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
     
    Bill Funk, Oct 25, 2006
    #11
  12. Lionel

    Bucky Guest

    Bill Funk wrote:
    > Cameras, like a host of other devices, come with manuals that tell you
    > *how* to use the device, but not *why* to use it.


    That reminds me of the time that I got new stove/range, and while
    reading the manual, I came across a section called Sabbath Mode. Even
    after reading the entire section and understanding how it worked, I was
    like, "WTF???"
     
    Bucky, Oct 25, 2006
    #12
  13. It's understandable why you might not be familiar with the reasoning for
    that mode. It is primariliy for religous (Orthodox and some
    conservatives) Jews who are forbidden to do any form of work (use of
    electricity, or other mechanical/electronic devices are considered work)
    on the Sabbath which runs from sundown Fri. to Sundown Sat..



    In article <>,
    says...
    > That reminds me of the time that I got new stove/range, and while
    > reading the manual, I came across a section called Sabbath Mode. Even
    > after reading the entire section and understanding how it worked, I was
    > like, "WTF???"
    >
    >
     
    Craig M. Bobchin, Oct 26, 2006
    #13
  14. > In article <>,
    > says...
    >> That reminds me of the time that I got new stove/range, and while
    >> reading the manual, I came across a section called Sabbath Mode. Even


    Craig M. Bobchin wrote:

    > It's understandable why you might not be familiar with the reasoning for
    > that mode. It is primariliy for religous (Orthodox and some
    > conservatives) Jews who are forbidden to do any form of work (use of
    > electricity, or other mechanical/electronic devices are considered work)
    > on the Sabbath which runs from sundown Fri. to Sundown Sat..



    Well, what happens to a stove in that mode? Is operation locked out for
    the observance?

    --
    John McWilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Oct 26, 2006
    #14
  15. Lionel

    Paul Rubin Guest

    John McWilliams <> writes:
    > > It's understandable why you might not be familiar with the reasoning
    > > for that mode. It is primariliy for religous (Orthodox and some
    > > conservatives) Jews who are forbidden to do any form of work (use of
    > > electricity, or other mechanical/electronic devices are considered
    > > work) on the Sabbath which runs from sundown Fri. to Sundown Sat..

    >
    > Well, what happens to a stove in that mode? Is operation locked out
    > for the observance?


    My guess is it turns itself on and off automatically according to a
    timer that you set before the Sabbath begins. E.g., you leave some
    food on top of it before sundown Friday and set it to turn itself on
    at noon on Saturday, so you have a hot lunch without actually making a
    fire during the Sabbath (since the machine has done it without your
    intervention).
     
    Paul Rubin, Oct 26, 2006
    #15
  16. Lionel

    Bucky Guest

    Paul Rubin wrote:
    > My guess is it turns itself on and off automatically according to a
    > timer that you set before the Sabbath begins.


    No, it's way more complicated than that. I remember reading the section
    and thinking: I know this has something to do with Jewish observation
    of Sabbath, but for the life of me I cannot deduce the Sabbath laws
    based on the functionality. Here's the official explanation:

    http://www.geconsumerproducts.com/pressroom/press_releases/appliances/cooking_products/sabbath.htm
     
    Bucky, Oct 26, 2006
    #16
  17. Lionel

    Paul Rubin Guest

    "Bucky" <> writes:
    > No, it's way more complicated than that. I remember reading the section
    > and thinking: I know this has something to do with Jewish observation
    > of Sabbath, but for the life of me I cannot deduce the Sabbath laws
    > based on the functionality. Here's the official explanation:


    Basically, Halacha (Jewish law) says you are not allowed to do any
    work on the Sabbath, which traditionally included making or putting
    out any type of fires. Rabbis in modern times have interpreted this
    to include things like turning lights or appliances on and off
    (turning on an electrical switch can make a spark). So for example,
    some observant people remove the light bulbs from inside their
    refrigerators, so they can open and close the door on Sabbath without
    turning a light on and off. The idea of "Sabbath mode" for that stove
    is that the stove does exactly what it's set to do ahead of time, and
    nothing the user does during the Sabbath changes what the stove does.
    So opening the oven door can't turn on an oven light, closing it won't
    start the oven timer going, etc.

    There are well known stories (I don't know if they're true) of some
    observant people making a habit of removing their fridge's light bulb
    on Friday before sundown and reinstalling it after Sabbath for use
    during the rest of the week, instead of just removing it permanently
    and doing without it. As the story goes, now and then someone with
    this habit forgets to remove the bulb on Friday, then opens the fridge
    on Saturday and the light comes on. That means they've committed a
    minor violation of the Sabbath commandment by accident, not that big a
    deal in the scheme of things. But if they now close the door (turning
    the light off), they'll be breaking the Sabbath on purpose, a much
    worse violation. So they have to leave the door open, and the food
    spoils.

    Despite stories like this, keeping the Sabbath is less crazy or
    neurotic than it sounds. I'm not observant at all, but I sort of envy
    those who are. The Sabbath is a time of enforced relaxation, where
    you put your job and messing with computers and doing your taxes and
    fussing over anything completely out of your existence and just enjoy
    being with your family and friends. There is no serious temptation to
    get a little more work done on that looming project, because doing
    work of any kind is simply not allowed, short of literal life-or-death
    emergencies.

    Of course if you are not observant (or not Jewish), these prohibitions
    don't affect you. You can turn lights on and off on Saturday. But a
    properly observant person wouldn't be allowed to request it of you
    (another topic of centuries of rabinnical discussion). That means in
    a situation like the above, if you're with an observant person and you
    think he'd like the lights to be turned on (or the fridge door closed
    or whatever), you should go ahead and do it without being asked. In
    some cases they will hint at what they want, but they can't come out
    and ask for it.
     
    Paul Rubin, Oct 26, 2006
    #17
  18. Paul Rubin wrote:
    > "Bucky" <> writes:
    >> No, it's way more complicated than that. I remember reading the section
    >> and thinking: I know this has something to do with Jewish observation
    >> of Sabbath, but for the life of me I cannot deduce the Sabbath laws
    >> based on the functionality. Here's the official explanation:

    >
    > Basically, Halacha (Jewish law) says you are not allowed to do any
    > work on the Sabbath, which traditionally included making or putting
    > out any type of fires. Rabbis in modern times have interpreted this
    > to include things like turning lights or appliances on and off
    > (turning on an electrical switch can make a spark). So for example,
    > some observant people remove the light bulbs from inside their
    > refrigerators, so they can open and close the door on Sabbath without
    > turning a light on and off. The idea of "Sabbath mode" for that stove
    > is that the stove does exactly what it's set to do ahead of time, and
    > nothing the user does during the Sabbath changes what the stove does.
    > So opening the oven door can't turn on an oven light, closing it won't
    > start the oven timer going, etc.
    >
    > There are well known stories (I don't know if they're true) of some
    > observant people making a habit of removing their fridge's light bulb
    > on Friday before sundown and reinstalling it after Sabbath for use
    > during the rest of the week, instead of just removing it permanently
    > and doing without it. As the story goes, now and then someone with
    > this habit forgets to remove the bulb on Friday, then opens the fridge
    > on Saturday and the light comes on. That means they've committed a
    > minor violation of the Sabbath commandment by accident, not that big a
    > deal in the scheme of things. But if they now close the door (turning
    > the light off), they'll be breaking the Sabbath on purpose, a much
    > worse violation. So they have to leave the door open, and the food
    > spoils.
    >
    > Despite stories like this, keeping the Sabbath is less crazy or
    > neurotic than it sounds. I'm not observant at all, but I sort of envy
    > those who are. The Sabbath is a time of enforced relaxation, where
    > you put your job and messing with computers and doing your taxes and
    > fussing over anything completely out of your existence and just enjoy
    > being with your family and friends. There is no serious temptation to
    > get a little more work done on that looming project, because doing
    > work of any kind is simply not allowed, short of literal life-or-death
    > emergencies.
    >
    > Of course if you are not observant (or not Jewish), these prohibitions
    > don't affect you. You can turn lights on and off on Saturday. But a
    > properly observant person wouldn't be allowed to request it of you
    > (another topic of centuries of rabinnical discussion). That means in
    > a situation like the above, if you're with an observant person and you
    > think he'd like the lights to be turned on (or the fridge door closed
    > or whatever), you should go ahead and do it without being asked. In
    > some cases they will hint at what they want, but they can't come out
    > and ask for it.


    Very interesting, and thank you. It's interesting how all religions I
    know of get into some interesting places via the interpretation of a
    rule or canon or observance.

    Somehow I can't equate the turning on of a light switch as "work". Nor
    making a fire, even, if you're freezing your tail off. Now, the wood
    should have been chopped before, though.... <s>

    --
    john mcwilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Oct 26, 2006
    #18
  19. Lionel

    Guest

    Paul Rubin wrote:
    > Of course if you are not observant (or not Jewish), these prohibitions
    > don't affect you. You can turn lights on and off on Saturday. But a
    > properly observant person wouldn't be allowed to request it of you
    > (another topic of centuries of rabinnical discussion). That means in
    > a situation like the above, if you're with an observant person and you
    > think he'd like the lights to be turned on (or the fridge door closed
    > or whatever), you should go ahead and do it without being asked. In
    > some cases they will hint at what they want, but they can't come out
    > and ask for it.


    Yeah, at one point my parents had an observant Jewish woman as a
    neighbor, and she arranged for my mom to come over on Friday nights and
    turn on/off lights because she couldn't do that herself. And my mom had
    to remember to do it, because the woman couldn't ask her to. A lot of
    the ways people comply with the prohibitions strike me as pretty silly.
    It looks like it's all about complying with only the letter of the law,
    and finding loopholes wherever possible. Sort of like tricking your
    deity on a technicality.

    -Gniewko
     
    , Oct 26, 2006
    #19
  20. Lionel

    John Turco Guest

    Paul Rubin wrote:
    >
    > John McWilliams <> writes:
    > > > It's understandable why you might not be familiar with the reasoning
    > > > for that mode. It is primariliy for religous (Orthodox and some
    > > > conservatives) Jews who are forbidden to do any form of work (use of
    > > > electricity, or other mechanical/electronic devices are considered
    > > > work) on the Sabbath which runs from sundown Fri. to Sundown Sat..

    > >
    > > Well, what happens to a stove in that mode? Is operation locked out
    > > for the observance?

    >
    > My guess is it turns itself on and off automatically according to a
    > timer that you set before the Sabbath begins. E.g., you leave some
    > food on top of it before sundown Friday and set it to turn itself on
    > at noon on Saturday, so you have a hot lunch without actually making a
    > fire during the Sabbath (since the machine has done it without your
    > intervention).



    Hello, Paul:

    It's a bit early for April Fool's jokes, is it not? ;-)


    Cordially,
    John Turco <>
     
    John Turco, Oct 27, 2006
    #20
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