Advice on Upgrading of Section of LAN to Wireless

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Drew, Aug 17, 2005.

  1. Drew

    Drew Guest

    We are trying to figure out how to get a portion of our LAN wireless. We
    have 9 users that would be affected by this and the area that would have to
    be supported would be about 300 ft.

    Our network consists of a T1 coming into the building, then going out to
    other buildings using fiber optics. There are 6 small (4-5 rooms) buildings
    that are currently using coax and BNC connectors, and we are having problems
    with the electrical storms taking out the BNC - RJ-45 devices. The 6
    buildings house about 9 users total.

    We have done some research and found 3 different types of wireless access
    points.

    1. 802.11a
    2. 802.11b
    3. 802.11g

    I am familiar with the B and G, but not with the A. And then we found one
    that combines A and G. Can anyone give me some advice to what we will need?

    Thanks,
    Drew
    Drew, Aug 17, 2005
    #1
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  2. Drew

    Jack \(MVP\) Guest

    Hi
    The current main stream Wireless is 802.11g which is down compatible with 802.11b.

    If you do not have users that specifically use 802.11a you do not need it.

    Wireless is heavily depending on the envioroment it is not so much an issue of what to
    buy but rather how it should be set to provide adequate coverage. It seems to me that
    you need a professional consultant to survey the site and give you advice.

    Jack (MVP-Networking).



    "Drew" <> wrote in message
    news:#...
    > We are trying to figure out how to get a portion of our LAN wireless. We
    > have 9 users that would be affected by this and the area that would have to
    > be supported would be about 300 ft.
    >
    > Our network consists of a T1 coming into the building, then going out to
    > other buildings using fiber optics. There are 6 small (4-5 rooms) buildings
    > that are currently using coax and BNC connectors, and we are having problems
    > with the electrical storms taking out the BNC - RJ-45 devices. The 6
    > buildings house about 9 users total.
    >
    > We have done some research and found 3 different types of wireless access
    > points.
    >
    > 1. 802.11a
    > 2. 802.11b
    > 3. 802.11g
    >
    > I am familiar with the B and G, but not with the A. And then we found one
    > that combines A and G. Can anyone give me some advice to what we will need?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Drew
    >
    >
    Jack \(MVP\), Aug 17, 2005
    #2
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  3. Drew

    Frankster Guest

    If I'm not mistaken (if I am, hopefully someone will correct me :) ), "a" is
    for direct WAN (cellular) connectivity. Like... Sprint, Verizon, Cingular,
    etc. Normally not used by the average Joe. Occasionally, if both are used,
    it can be advantageous to have both A and G supported in one card. But is a
    somewhat rare requirement. B and G are both typical wireless standards. G,
    the fastest and most recent, is downward compatible with B. In today's
    world, barring any unusual requirements, you would want G.

    -Frank

    "Drew" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > We are trying to figure out how to get a portion of our LAN wireless. We
    > have 9 users that would be affected by this and the area that would have
    > to be supported would be about 300 ft.
    >
    > Our network consists of a T1 coming into the building, then going out to
    > other buildings using fiber optics. There are 6 small (4-5 rooms)
    > buildings that are currently using coax and BNC connectors, and we are
    > having problems with the electrical storms taking out the BNC - RJ-45
    > devices. The 6 buildings house about 9 users total.
    >
    > We have done some research and found 3 different types of wireless access
    > points.
    >
    > 1. 802.11a
    > 2. 802.11b
    > 3. 802.11g
    >
    > I am familiar with the B and G, but not with the A. And then we found one
    > that combines A and G. Can anyone give me some advice to what we will
    > need?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Drew
    >
    >
    Frankster, Aug 17, 2005
    #3
  4. Drew

    David Hettel Guest

    Nope "A" has nothing to do with cellular. Generally you would want to
    support "B" or "G" with "G" being the newer standard. "B" will be required
    if you wish to support users with Windows Mobile Pocket PCs. You may want to
    think about "A" if you want the extra security it may provide, by being less
    popular.

    David Hettel
    Microsoft MVP
    Mobile Devices
    "Frankster" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If I'm not mistaken (if I am, hopefully someone will correct me :) ), "a"
    > is for direct WAN (cellular) connectivity. Like... Sprint, Verizon,
    > Cingular, etc. Normally not used by the average Joe. Occasionally, if
    > both are used, it can be advantageous to have both A and G supported in
    > one card. But is a somewhat rare requirement. B and G are both typical
    > wireless standards. G, the fastest and most recent, is downward compatible
    > with B. In today's world, barring any unusual requirements, you would
    > want G.
    >
    > -Frank
    >
    > "Drew" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> We are trying to figure out how to get a portion of our LAN wireless. We
    >> have 9 users that would be affected by this and the area that would have
    >> to be supported would be about 300 ft.
    >>
    >> Our network consists of a T1 coming into the building, then going out to
    >> other buildings using fiber optics. There are 6 small (4-5 rooms)
    >> buildings that are currently using coax and BNC connectors, and we are
    >> having problems with the electrical storms taking out the BNC - RJ-45
    >> devices. The 6 buildings house about 9 users total.
    >>
    >> We have done some research and found 3 different types of wireless access
    >> points.
    >>
    >> 1. 802.11a
    >> 2. 802.11b
    >> 3. 802.11g
    >>
    >> I am familiar with the B and G, but not with the A. And then we found
    >> one that combines A and G. Can anyone give me some advice to what we
    >> will need?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Drew
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    David Hettel, Aug 17, 2005
    #4
  5. Drew

    Frankster Guest

    > Nope "A" has nothing to do with cellular. Generally you would want to
    > support "B" or "G" with "G" being the newer standard.


    Yep. Thanks for that info. I've now taken time to look it up and it
    appears that the most significant difference between "a" and "g" is that "g"
    operates on 2.5Ghz to maintain compatibility with "b" whereas "a" operates
    on 5Ghz. Since "g" has won the popularity race and it is compatible with
    "b", "g" is the way to go.

    UNLESS.... and I kinda like this part, you are having a lot of interference
    from your 2.4Ghz radio telephones in proximity to your wireless nodes.
    Then, I guess the "a" operating at 5Ghz would be preferable.

    For anyone else that is as clueless about "a" as I was, here's a good
    link...

    http://www.tutorial-reports.com/wireless/wlanwifi/introduction_wifi.php

    Sorry for any miss-info.

    -Frank
    Frankster, Aug 18, 2005
    #5
  6. Drew

    Drew Guest

    Thanks for the info and links! I will keep diggin around and see what I can
    find...

    Drew

    "Frankster" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    >> Nope "A" has nothing to do with cellular. Generally you would want to
    >> support "B" or "G" with "G" being the newer standard.

    >
    > Yep. Thanks for that info. I've now taken time to look it up and it
    > appears that the most significant difference between "a" and "g" is that
    > "g" operates on 2.5Ghz to maintain compatibility with "b" whereas "a"
    > operates on 5Ghz. Since "g" has won the popularity race and it is
    > compatible with "b", "g" is the way to go.
    >
    > UNLESS.... and I kinda like this part, you are having a lot of
    > interference from your 2.4Ghz radio telephones in proximity to your
    > wireless nodes. Then, I guess the "a" operating at 5Ghz would be
    > preferable.
    >
    > For anyone else that is as clueless about "a" as I was, here's a good
    > link...
    >
    > http://www.tutorial-reports.com/wireless/wlanwifi/introduction_wifi.php
    >
    > Sorry for any miss-info.
    >
    > -Frank
    >
    Drew, Aug 19, 2005
    #6
  7. Drew

    David {MVP} Guest

    Another reason to go with "A" is that it will not interfere with a video
    sender, so if you are wirelessly transmitting video from one room to another
    you'll want to disable the "B" and "G" or go with an "A" mode Accesspoint.

    --
    David {MVP}
    Microsoft Mobile Devices
    Mobile AntiVirus Researchers Association

    Please post *ALL* questions and replies to the news group for the mutual
    benefit of all of us...
    The MS-MVP Program - http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
    The MARA Program - http://www.mobileav.org/index.html

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
    rights...


    Spelling and grammar errors left in for those that need a little joy in
    their life by correcting me.

    "Drew" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Thanks for the info and links! I will keep diggin around and see what I
    > can find...
    >
    > Drew
    >
    > "Frankster" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >>> Nope "A" has nothing to do with cellular. Generally you would want to
    >>> support "B" or "G" with "G" being the newer standard.

    >>
    >> Yep. Thanks for that info. I've now taken time to look it up and it
    >> appears that the most significant difference between "a" and "g" is that
    >> "g" operates on 2.5Ghz to maintain compatibility with "b" whereas "a"
    >> operates on 5Ghz. Since "g" has won the popularity race and it is
    >> compatible with "b", "g" is the way to go.
    >>
    >> UNLESS.... and I kinda like this part, you are having a lot of
    >> interference from your 2.4Ghz radio telephones in proximity to your
    >> wireless nodes. Then, I guess the "a" operating at 5Ghz would be
    >> preferable.
    >>
    >> For anyone else that is as clueless about "a" as I was, here's a good
    >> link...
    >>
    >> http://www.tutorial-reports.com/wireless/wlanwifi/introduction_wifi.php
    >>
    >> Sorry for any miss-info.
    >>
    >> -Frank
    >>

    >
    >
    David {MVP}, Aug 19, 2005
    #7
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