Advice on minibeast photos

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by robotiser@googlemail.com, Aug 7, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I have an aging digital camera (1.3 megapixels) with built in flash. I
    also have a son who wants to go pond-dipping all the time. I'd prefer
    to just watch things in their natural environment, but he wants to
    catch them (and put them back).

    I notice that many of the creatures that we catch (as an example, water
    hoglice) don't have photos on the wikipedia. So if I could take
    acceptable quality photos of some of these, I could post them on the
    wikipedia. Does anyone have any advice on taking photos of aquatic
    organisims with an elderly digital camera? There are some photos of
    newts that look like they've been taken during pond-dipping

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newt

    but most of the organisms I would be photographing would be much
    smaller. I'd also like to take photos of things (such as juvenile
    barbel) just sitting on the bottom of the river in a place where the
    water is shallow and clear. But since this is under a bridge I imagine
    that the flash would trigger, and all I'd get would be reflections from
    the surface.
     
    , Aug 7, 2006
    #1
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  2. Bill Guest

    wrote:

    >I have an aging digital camera (1.3 megapixels) with built in flash. I
    >also have a son who wants to go pond-dipping all the time.


    That's fine for snapshots like this.

    >but most of the organisms I would be photographing would be much
    >smaller. I'd also like to take photos of things (such as juvenile
    >barbel) just sitting on the bottom of the river in a place where the
    >water is shallow and clear. But since this is under a bridge I imagine
    >that the flash would trigger, and all I'd get would be reflections from
    >the surface.


    With smooth water, you can shoot at a slight angle to reduce glare and
    help avoid reflections.

    But what you really need to do is get under the surface. You could use a
    clear bag that you know is waterproof and hold the camera just below the
    surface. Even a large Ziploc bag open so you can hold the camera, but
    covering the front just a few millimeters below the surface would make a
    big difference.

    I used two bags one time to shoot just under the surface in a pool. I
    put the camera in a tight zip lock bag, then put another bigger bag
    around it with a bit of air in it so it was buoyant but I could still
    trigger the camera. You have to make sure the plastic over the lense
    remains smooth and flat, but it worked great.

    You might see if a waterproof housing is available for a reasonable
    price too, but I don't see why plastic bags wouldn't work just as well
    for this simple purpose.
     
    Bill, Aug 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. Stewy Guest

    In article <>,
    Bill <> wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    > >I have an aging digital camera (1.3 megapixels) with built in flash. I
    > >also have a son who wants to go pond-dipping all the time.

    >
    > That's fine for snapshots like this.
    >
    > >but most of the organisms I would be photographing would be much
    > >smaller. I'd also like to take photos of things (such as juvenile
    > >barbel) just sitting on the bottom of the river in a place where the
    > >water is shallow and clear. But since this is under a bridge I imagine
    > >that the flash would trigger, and all I'd get would be reflections from
    > >the surface.

    >
    > With smooth water, you can shoot at a slight angle to reduce glare and
    > help avoid reflections.
    >
    > But what you really need to do is get under the surface. You could use a
    > clear bag that you know is waterproof and hold the camera just below the
    > surface. Even a large Ziploc bag open so you can hold the camera, but
    > covering the front just a few millimeters below the surface would make a
    > big difference.
    >
    > I used two bags one time to shoot just under the surface in a pool. I
    > put the camera in a tight zip lock bag, then put another bigger bag
    > around it with a bit of air in it so it was buoyant but I could still
    > trigger the camera. You have to make sure the plastic over the lense
    > remains smooth and flat, but it worked great.
    >
    > You might see if a waterproof housing is available for a reasonable
    > price too, but I don't see why plastic bags wouldn't work just as well
    > for this simple purpose.


    I saw one man using a plastic bucket missing the bottom with a sheet of
    perspex glued in place
     
    Stewy, Aug 16, 2006
    #3
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