Advice on digital TV please

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by John S, May 15, 2012.

  1. John S

    John S Guest

    I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a digital
    TV setup involves computers :)

    Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to see
    if I can manage a DIY changeover.

    1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.

    I've been told that satellite has not as good quality as terrestrial, and
    is also subject to rain fade.
    But does satellite have any advantages?
    For example, with a satellite dish do you have the opportunity to receive
    free programmes that are not broadcast over the terrestrial system?
    And, if so, do you need a separate dish for each satellite you want to
    listen to?

    We are on the fringe area of Whakatane for receiving the terrestrial
    signal, and I still have to try and work out a way of finding if we can
    receive that signal at our house. Have spoken to an installer who thought
    he might be getting a portable UHF aerial and signal monitor at some stage,
    but can't help in the meantime. Tried to contact another installer, but
    seems like they are all pretty busy.

    I tried typing my address in the freeview coverage site and received the
    verdict of "unlikely" for UHF aerial coverage. However, I also typed in a
    couple on addresses where I know they get a reasonably good UHF signal and
    received the same "unlikely" response, so I guess the freeview coverage
    information errs on the conservative side.

    2. How feasible to set up your own aerial or dish and line it up?

    Wondering if there are any good NZ web sites with technical info on what
    equipment is needed, and how to set it up.

    3. Choosing the right consumer equipment?

    We presently have quite a flexible setup with a DVD recorder and a VHS
    cassette recorder, allowing us to record two different programmes
    simultaneously (and watch a third if we want to).
    Our TV is a 6 year old Phillips CRT TV.

    At very least we would like to be able to record one programme whilst
    watching another, and when playing back have something easy to control so
    we can skip through the "ads".

    Had a look on the freeview site for equipment and I see they only list two
    satellite recorders on their approved list, though there are several UHF
    type recorders.
    I see there are other devices listed at freeviewshop.co.nz, though they
    appear to require an additional external usb HDD for recording.

    Any hints about how to select something reliable and flexible?

    Guess I can do some more searching on the web, but any hints on where to
    get useful info, or recommendations for good appliances would be welcome.

    If all else fails, I might give in and subscribe to Sky TV, though I think
    it is pretty expensive.

    Cheers,

    John S
     
    John S, May 15, 2012
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. John S

    bugalugs Guest

    On 15/05/2012 7:54 p.m., John S wrote:
    > I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a digital
    > TV setup involves computers :)
    >
    > Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    > over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to see
    > if I can manage a DIY changeover.
    >
    > 1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.
    >
    > I've been told that satellite has not as good quality as terrestrial, and
    > is also subject to rain fade.
    > But does satellite have any advantages?
    > For example, with a satellite dish do you have the opportunity to receive
    > free programmes that are not broadcast over the terrestrial system?
    > And, if so, do you need a separate dish for each satellite you want to
    > listen to?
    >
    > We are on the fringe area of Whakatane for receiving the terrestrial
    > signal, and I still have to try and work out a way of finding if we can
    > receive that signal at our house. Have spoken to an installer who thought
    > he might be getting a portable UHF aerial and signal monitor at some stage,
    > but can't help in the meantime. Tried to contact another installer, but
    > seems like they are all pretty busy.
    >
    > I tried typing my address in the freeview coverage site and received the
    > verdict of "unlikely" for UHF aerial coverage. However, I also typed in a
    > couple on addresses where I know they get a reasonably good UHF signal and
    > received the same "unlikely" response, so I guess the freeview coverage
    > information errs on the conservative side.


    If you can beg borrow or steal someones old UHF aerial and can pick up
    Prime on your existing equipment you should be able to get Terrestrial
    freeview.

    >
    > 2. How feasible to set up your own aerial or dish and line it up?
    >


    Go to Google Earth Tools Ruler Path and draw a line from the
    transmitter to your place. Zoom in and see what features the line passes
    through which you can see from your place and aim for that.
    Check other UHF aerials in your area for vertical or horizontal
    polarisation.

    > Wondering if there are any good NZ web sites with technical info on what
    > equipment is needed, and how to set it up.
    >
    > 3. Choosing the right consumer equipment?
    >
    > We presently have quite a flexible setup with a DVD recorder and a VHS
    > cassette recorder, allowing us to record two different programmes
    > simultaneously (and watch a third if we want to).
    > Our TV is a 6 year old Phillips CRT TV.
    >
    > At very least we would like to be able to record one programme whilst
    > watching another, and when playing back have something easy to control so
    > we can skip through the "ads".
    >
    > Had a look on the freeview site for equipment and I see they only list two
    > satellite recorders on their approved list, though there are several UHF
    > type recorders.
    > I see there are other devices listed at freeviewshop.co.nz, though they
    > appear to require an additional external usb HDD for recording.
    >
    > Any hints about how to select something reliable and flexible?
    >
    > Guess I can do some more searching on the web, but any hints on where to
    > get useful info, or recommendations for good appliances would be welcome.
    >
    > If all else fails, I might give in and subscribe to Sky TV, though I think
    > it is pretty expensive.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > John S



    --
    Everyone is entitled to be stupid, but some abuse the privilege.
     
    bugalugs, May 15, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. John S

    Dave Doe Guest

    In article <jouksk$1m5$>, ,
    bugalugs says...
    >
    > On 15/05/2012 7:54 p.m., John S wrote:
    > > I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a digital
    > > TV setup involves computers :)
    > >
    > > Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    > > over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to see
    > > if I can manage a DIY changeover.
    > >
    > > 1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.
    > >
    > > I've been told that satellite has not as good quality as terrestrial, and
    > > is also subject to rain fade.
    > > But does satellite have any advantages?
    > > For example, with a satellite dish do you have the opportunity to receive
    > > free programmes that are not broadcast over the terrestrial system?
    > > And, if so, do you need a separate dish for each satellite you want to
    > > listen to?
    > >
    > > We are on the fringe area of Whakatane for receiving the terrestrial
    > > signal, and I still have to try and work out a way of finding if we can
    > > receive that signal at our house. Have spoken to an installer who thought
    > > he might be getting a portable UHF aerial and signal monitor at some stage,
    > > but can't help in the meantime. Tried to contact another installer, but
    > > seems like they are all pretty busy.
    > >
    > > I tried typing my address in the freeview coverage site and received the
    > > verdict of "unlikely" for UHF aerial coverage. However, I also typed in a
    > > couple on addresses where I know they get a reasonably good UHF signal and
    > > received the same "unlikely" response, so I guess the freeview coverage
    > > information errs on the conservative side.

    >
    > If you can beg borrow or steal someones old UHF aerial and can pick up
    > Prime on your existing equipment you should be able to get Terrestrial
    > freeview.
    >
    > >
    > > 2. How feasible to set up your own aerial or dish and line it up?
    > >

    >
    > Go to Google Earth Tools Ruler Path and draw a line from the
    > transmitter to your place. Zoom in and see what features the line passes
    > through which you can see from your place and aim for that.
    > Check other UHF aerials in your area for vertical or horizontal
    > polarisation.


    That's a cool idea! - how reliable is it really though?

    --
    Duncan.
     
    Dave Doe, May 15, 2012
    #3
  4. On Tue, 15 May 2012 19:54:23 +1200, John S <>
    wrote:

    >I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a digital
    >TV setup involves computers :)
    >
    >Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    >over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to see
    >if I can manage a DIY changeover.
    >
    >1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.
    >
    >I've been told that satellite has not as good quality as terrestrial, and
    >is also subject to rain fade.
    >But does satellite have any advantages?
    >For example, with a satellite dish do you have the opportunity to receive
    >free programmes that are not broadcast over the terrestrial system?
    >And, if so, do you need a separate dish for each satellite you want to
    >listen to?
    >
    >We are on the fringe area of Whakatane for receiving the terrestrial
    >signal, and I still have to try and work out a way of finding if we can
    >receive that signal at our house. Have spoken to an installer who thought
    >he might be getting a portable UHF aerial and signal monitor at some stage,
    >but can't help in the meantime. Tried to contact another installer, but
    >seems like they are all pretty busy.
    >
    >I tried typing my address in the freeview coverage site and received the
    >verdict of "unlikely" for UHF aerial coverage. However, I also typed in a
    >couple on addresses where I know they get a reasonably good UHF signal and
    >received the same "unlikely" response, so I guess the freeview coverage
    >information errs on the conservative side.
    >
    >2. How feasible to set up your own aerial or dish and line it up?
    >
    >Wondering if there are any good NZ web sites with technical info on what
    >equipment is needed, and how to set it up.
    >
    >3. Choosing the right consumer equipment?
    >
    >We presently have quite a flexible setup with a DVD recorder and a VHS
    >cassette recorder, allowing us to record two different programmes
    >simultaneously (and watch a third if we want to).
    >Our TV is a 6 year old Phillips CRT TV.
    >
    >At very least we would like to be able to record one programme whilst
    >watching another, and when playing back have something easy to control so
    >we can skip through the "ads".
    >
    >Had a look on the freeview site for equipment and I see they only list two
    >satellite recorders on their approved list, though there are several UHF
    >type recorders.
    >I see there are other devices listed at freeviewshop.co.nz, though they
    >appear to require an additional external usb HDD for recording.
    >
    >Any hints about how to select something reliable and flexible?
    >
    >Guess I can do some more searching on the web, but any hints on where to
    >get useful info, or recommendations for good appliances would be welcome.
    >
    >If all else fails, I might give in and subscribe to Sky TV, though I think
    >it is pretty expensive.
    >
    >Cheers,
    >
    >John S



    Stick to LG or Samsung TV's for USB video playback, these others have
    only AVI/DIVX support.

    DVB-T1 also has rain problems if you have trees in the way.

    Freeview approved brands do now allow extra channels but Freeview
    approves PVR's are far easy to use and dead easy to set the recording.

    Don't go the Plasma way its being dropped like hot cakes Plus leave Tivo
    alone no support and the network package has to be brought from OZZ
    $90au if needed, Tivo is old 2006 made in Mexico


    DishTV T1050 is a nice PVR records 2 Channels has a 500GB HD can be
    got for less thay $300.


    BUT BEFORE YOU DO ANY THING, CHECK YOUR UHF RECEPTION IS OK, and dont
    use a cow boy to do it.
     
    Frank Williams, May 15, 2012
    #4
  5. John S

    bugalugs Guest

    On 16/05/2012 10:37 a.m., Dave Doe wrote:
    > In article<jouksk$1m5$>, ,
    > bugalugs says...
    >>
    >> On 15/05/2012 7:54 p.m., John S wrote:
    >>> I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a digital
    >>> TV setup involves computers :)
    >>>
    >>> Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    >>> over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to see
    >>> if I can manage a DIY changeover.
    >>>
    >>> 1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.
    >>>
    >>> I've been told that satellite has not as good quality as terrestrial, and
    >>> is also subject to rain fade.
    >>> But does satellite have any advantages?
    >>> For example, with a satellite dish do you have the opportunity to receive
    >>> free programmes that are not broadcast over the terrestrial system?
    >>> And, if so, do you need a separate dish for each satellite you want to
    >>> listen to?
    >>>
    >>> We are on the fringe area of Whakatane for receiving the terrestrial
    >>> signal, and I still have to try and work out a way of finding if we can
    >>> receive that signal at our house. Have spoken to an installer who thought
    >>> he might be getting a portable UHF aerial and signal monitor at some stage,
    >>> but can't help in the meantime. Tried to contact another installer, but
    >>> seems like they are all pretty busy.
    >>>
    >>> I tried typing my address in the freeview coverage site and received the
    >>> verdict of "unlikely" for UHF aerial coverage. However, I also typed in a
    >>> couple on addresses where I know they get a reasonably good UHF signal and
    >>> received the same "unlikely" response, so I guess the freeview coverage
    >>> information errs on the conservative side.

    >>
    >> If you can beg borrow or steal someones old UHF aerial and can pick up
    >> Prime on your existing equipment you should be able to get Terrestrial
    >> freeview.
    >>
    >>>
    >>> 2. How feasible to set up your own aerial or dish and line it up?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Go to Google Earth Tools Ruler Path and draw a line from the
    >> transmitter to your place. Zoom in and see what features the line passes
    >> through which you can see from your place and aim for that.
    >> Check other UHF aerials in your area for vertical or horizontal
    >> polarisation.

    >
    > That's a cool idea! - how reliable is it really though?
    >


    Worked for me.

    I had problems getting a reliable signal because there was a lot of
    trees and then a line of a shelterbelt (close) between me and the local
    transmitter so I turned around and looked at Mt Te Aroha 47km away. I
    couldn't see the transmitter but Google Earth showed the direct line was
    through a Eucalypt way over on the other side of the valley. Bingo

    --
    Everyone is entitled to be stupid, but some abuse the privilege.
     
    bugalugs, May 16, 2012
    #5
  6. John S

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs bugalugs wrote:
    > On 16/05/2012 10:37 a.m., Dave Doe wrote:
    >> In article<jouksk$1m5$>, ,

    [snip]
    >>> Go to Google Earth Tools Ruler Path and draw a line from the
    >>> transmitter to your place. Zoom in and see what features the line
    >>> passes through which you can see from your place and aim for that.
    >>> Check other UHF aerials in your area for vertical or horizontal
    >>> polarisation.

    >>
    >> That's a cool idea! - how reliable is it really though?
    >>

    >
    > Worked for me.
    >
    > I had problems getting a reliable signal because there was a lot of
    > trees and then a line of a shelterbelt (close) between me and the
    > local transmitter so I turned around and looked at Mt Te Aroha 47km
    > away. I couldn't see the transmitter but Google Earth showed the
    > direct line was through a Eucalypt way over on the other side of the
    > valley. Bingo


    Great tip there bugs, thanks.

    Trust me to leave it until the weather's turned to crap to sort it out but
    anyway, I could use some advice....

    I'm in Pukekohe and the UHF signal's always been marhinal around here. I was
    told yesterday that out closest transmitter is in the Waitakere ranges (and
    all the antennas that I can see seem to be pointing that way) and that, even
    with a high-gain antenna the best this guy could get is 27% signal strength.

    I have an old Sky high-gain UHF antenna from back in my pre-injury days,
    back when I used to get Sky for the F1. It was set up here in Puke and the
    picture was quite acceptable. However, now it's in my shed and one of the 12
    clip-in X shaped bits has been missing for a long time. (I took the antenna
    with me as the house was being removed after I moved out - I know you're
    supposed to leave them but ... anyway.)

    Do you think the missing X piece make much difference? I'm basically trying
    to work out if it's worth me trying to set this thing up (now I have a TV
    with a built-in Freeview tuner). As I usually watch very little TV - at most
    the first part of 3 News maybe twice, three times a week - I've been making
    do with amplified bunny-ears. It's barely sufficient for channels 2, 3 and 4
    but, despite this thing having a dedicated UHF loop (as well as the 'ears')
    I don't have any luck with any digital or analogue UHF channels.

    D'ya reckon it's worth me trying this old Sky high-gain thing? It's a bit
    rusty (the reflector screens or whatever they are) and, as mentioned, one X
    is missing. However I'm currently not in a position to buy a new one, or get
    a professional to 'do an install' so I'm considering calling in my favours
    with the neighbour and putting this old thing up. I have some fairly new
    co-ax, just long enough if I put it on the roof right above my bedroom.

    What say you (and anyone else who might know)? I'd hate to call in my
    favours for nothing - I've been banking them for a while in case I need help
    with something that's difficult for me to do alone, or indeed having the
    neighbour do something for me entirely. Is it likely to work? Is that
    missing element going to make a big difference? As they clip in (and out)
    where would it be best to leave a gap on the length of the antenna?

    Thanks very much in advance. :)
    --
    Shaun.

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
     
    ~misfit~, May 16, 2012
    #6
  7. John S

    bugalugs Guest

    On 16/05/2012 2:26 p.m., ~misfit~ wrote:
    > Somewhere on teh intarwebs bugalugs wrote:
    >> On 16/05/2012 10:37 a.m., Dave Doe wrote:
    >>> In article<jouksk$1m5$>, ,

    > [snip]
    >>>> Go to Google Earth Tools Ruler Path and draw a line from the
    >>>> transmitter to your place. Zoom in and see what features the line
    >>>> passes through which you can see from your place and aim for that.
    >>>> Check other UHF aerials in your area for vertical or horizontal
    >>>> polarisation.
    >>>
    >>> That's a cool idea! - how reliable is it really though?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Worked for me.
    >>
    >> I had problems getting a reliable signal because there was a lot of
    >> trees and then a line of a shelterbelt (close) between me and the
    >> local transmitter so I turned around and looked at Mt Te Aroha 47km
    >> away. I couldn't see the transmitter but Google Earth showed the
    >> direct line was through a Eucalypt way over on the other side of the
    >> valley. Bingo

    >
    > Great tip there bugs, thanks.
    >
    > Trust me to leave it until the weather's turned to crap to sort it out but
    > anyway, I could use some advice....
    >
    > I'm in Pukekohe and the UHF signal's always been marhinal around here. I was
    > told yesterday that out closest transmitter is in the Waitakere ranges (and
    > all the antennas that I can see seem to be pointing that way) and that, even
    > with a high-gain antenna the best this guy could get is 27% signal strength.
    >
    > I have an old Sky high-gain UHF antenna from back in my pre-injury days,
    > back when I used to get Sky for the F1. It was set up here in Puke and the
    > picture was quite acceptable. However, now it's in my shed and one of the 12
    > clip-in X shaped bits has been missing for a long time. (I took the antenna
    > with me as the house was being removed after I moved out - I know you're
    > supposed to leave them but ... anyway.)
    >
    > Do you think the missing X piece make much difference? I'm basically trying
    > to work out if it's worth me trying to set this thing up (now I have a TV
    > with a built-in Freeview tuner). As I usually watch very little TV - at most
    > the first part of 3 News maybe twice, three times a week - I've been making
    > do with amplified bunny-ears. It's barely sufficient for channels 2, 3 and 4
    > but, despite this thing having a dedicated UHF loop (as well as the 'ears')
    > I don't have any luck with any digital or analogue UHF channels.
    >
    > D'ya reckon it's worth me trying this old Sky high-gain thing? It's a bit
    > rusty (the reflector screens or whatever they are) and, as mentioned, one X
    > is missing. However I'm currently not in a position to buy a new one, or get
    > a professional to 'do an install' so I'm considering calling in my favours
    > with the neighbour and putting this old thing up. I have some fairly new
    > co-ax, just long enough if I put it on the roof right above my bedroom.
    >
    > What say you (and anyone else who might know)? I'd hate to call in my
    > favours for nothing - I've been banking them for a while in case I need help
    > with something that's difficult for me to do alone, or indeed having the
    > neighbour do something for me entirely. Is it likely to work? Is that
    > missing element going to make a big difference? As they clip in (and out)
    > where would it be best to leave a gap on the length of the antenna?
    >
    > Thanks very much in advance. :)



    First of all I know SFA, but as I understand it: the aerial consists of
    a reflector,(at the back) a dipole,(second from back) and a number of
    directional arrays. If it is just one of the arrays missing it should
    still pick up a signal. Just not as effectivly. I think the critical
    point is the connection of the co-ax to the dipole.

    (Someone with more knowledge can chip-in here and correctly name the parts)

    If it doesn't work I've got an old UHF aerial hanging out in the trees
    somewhere which I can drop it in mid-June when I go up for my
    granddaughter's birthday.





    --
    Everyone is entitled to be stupid, but some abuse the privilege.
     
    bugalugs, May 16, 2012
    #7
  8. On Tue, 15 May 2012 19:54:23 +1200, John S <>
    wrote:

    >I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a digital
    >TV setup involves computers :)
    >
    >Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    >over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to see
    >if I can manage a DIY changeover.
    >
    >1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.



    One of the better Antennas for Terrestrial is a Phase array but they
    work best for Horizontal transmission.


    This is the one that I have fitted but we don't have Horizontal
    transmission.


    http://www.wisi.de/cgi-bin/online_katalog.pl?prod_id=36

    Many other brands like this but I got mine cheap $75
     
    Frank Williams, May 16, 2012
    #8
  9. John S

    bugalugs Guest

    On 16/05/2012 4:26 p.m., Frank Williams wrote:
    > On Tue, 15 May 2012 19:54:23 +1200, John S<>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a digital
    >> TV setup involves computers :)
    >>
    >> Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    >> over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to see
    >> if I can manage a DIY changeover.
    >>
    >> 1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.

    >
    >
    > One of the better Antennas for Terrestrial is a Phase array but they
    > work best for Horizontal transmission.
    >
    >
    > This is the one that I have fitted but we don't have Horizontal
    > transmission.
    >
    >
    > http://www.wisi.de/cgi-bin/online_katalog.pl?prod_id=36
    >
    > Many other brands like this but I got mine cheap $75
    >



    Tricky Dicky has them at $77.

    Last Thursday my daughter at Paraparaumu was trying (unsuccessfully) to
    line up the Nara Road transmitter using one of those. Could only get 2
    channels and the quality was worse than any analogue I've seen.

    Spoke to a friend at Kuratau who was trying to pick up a signal from
    Kinlock which he could see across the lake. Could only get a poor signal
    through a very narrow angle when pointed well off to the side.

    --
    Everyone is entitled to be stupid, but some abuse the privilege.
     
    bugalugs, May 16, 2012
    #9
  10. John S

    Me Guest

    On 16/05/2012 5:11 p.m., bugalugs wrote:
    > On 16/05/2012 4:26 p.m., Frank Williams wrote:
    >> On Tue, 15 May 2012 19:54:23 +1200, John S<>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a
    >>> digital
    >>> TV setup involves computers :)
    >>>
    >>> Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    >>> over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to
    >>> see
    >>> if I can manage a DIY changeover.
    >>>
    >>> 1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.

    >>
    >>
    >> One of the better Antennas for Terrestrial is a Phase array but they
    >> work best for Horizontal transmission.
    >>
    >>
    >> This is the one that I have fitted but we don't have Horizontal
    >> transmission.
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www.wisi.de/cgi-bin/online_katalog.pl?prod_id=36
    >>
    >> Many other brands like this but I got mine cheap $75
    >>

    >
    >
    > Tricky Dicky has them at $77.
    >
    > Last Thursday my daughter at Paraparaumu was trying (unsuccessfully) to
    > line up the Nara Road transmitter using one of those. Could only get 2
    > channels and the quality was worse than any analogue I've seen.
    >
    > Spoke to a friend at Kuratau who was trying to pick up a signal from
    > Kinlock which he could see across the lake. Could only get a poor signal
    > through a very narrow angle when pointed well off to the side.
    >

    We are pretty well stuffed for line of sight to Sugarloaf in
    Christchurch. We had the alternative of using a small analogue TV
    translator in South Brighton, but we've used Freeview satellite instead.
    Freeview satellite sucks.
    It would seem pretty reasonable that they might replace the existing
    analogue UHF repeater with a digital UHF repeater at South Brighton...
    But they're not going to do that are they? I guess the $ for freeing up
    the frequency for sale, is worth more than increasing population coverage.
    But what are they going to do? I can't find anything on the freeview
    website apart from "aspirational goals" for covering x% of NZ with
    Freeview terrestrial.
    Do they actually have any plans?
     
    Me, May 16, 2012
    #10
  11. John S

    Gordon Guest

    On 2012-05-15, John S <> wrote:
    > I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a digital
    > TV setup involves computers :)
    >
    > Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    > over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to see
    > if I can manage a DIY changeover.
    >
    > 1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.
    >
    > I've been told that satellite has not as good quality as terrestrial, and
    > is also subject to rain fade.
    > But does satellite have any advantages?


    You can get reception in places Teressitial does know even exist.( This is
    why the West Coast is going Digital first with Hawkes Bay.)

    > For example, with a satellite dish do you have the opportunity to receive
    > free programmes that are not broadcast over the terrestrial system?
    > And, if so, do you need a separate dish for each satellite you want to
    > listen to?


    No, you just move the dish. Just like a radio telescope. However I think NZ
    has only one satelite, so question is rather point less. Thinking about it
    these sats do not cost a few dollars each so they better work hard.
    >
    > We are on the fringe area of Whakatane for receiving the terrestrial
    > signal, and I still have to try and work out a way of finding if we can
    > receive that signal at our house.


    There is no fringe for digital. Either you have or you do not. None of this
    fuzzy stuff on the edges.

    >
    > I tried typing my address in the freeview coverage site and received the
    > verdict of "unlikely" for UHF aerial coverage. However, I also typed in a
    > couple on addresses where I know they get a reasonably good UHF signal


    is it digital or analogue?

    and
    > received the same "unlikely" response, so I guess the freeview coverage
    > information errs on the conservative side.


    Fergis sure agrees.


    >
    > 2. How feasible to set up your own aerial or dish and line it up?



    How much is your time worth? Installers will have it working a great deal
    faster than you.

    But then you see these dishes on vehicles in camping grounds so maybe after
    you have done it a couple of times its is easy peasy.

    >
    > Wondering if there are any good NZ web sites with technical info on what
    > equipment is needed, and how to set it up.


    >
    > 3. Choosing the right consumer equipment?
    >
    > We presently have quite a flexible setup with a DVD recorder and a VHS
    > cassette recorder,


    Do these record digital? Doubt it, might be wrong.


    > allowing us to record two different programmes
    > simultaneously (and watch a third if we want to).
    > Our TV is a 6 year old Phillips CRT TV.
    >

    It is about plugs and sockets.

    Satelite has a RF plug, UHF a UHF one.

    SEtup boxes have the video and RCA plugs as out put, which do to the TV
    okay.

    You will need a tuner, for each programme. Well, not quite correct, as it is
    possible to get two xchannels on the some multiplex stream off the
    saterlite.

    I would go satelite, if you can afford the extra approx $100 and do not mind
    a dish hanging off the house.

    Hope that is of some help.

    I went the satelite and built a MythTV box. Started off as a challenge and
    went it worked I kept using it. Not for everyone.
     
    Gordon, May 16, 2012
    #11
  12. John S

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Somewhere on teh intarwebs bugalugs wrote:
    > On 16/05/2012 2:26 p.m., ~misfit~ wrote:

    [snip]
    >> Trust me to leave it until the weather's turned to crap to sort it
    >> out but anyway, I could use some advice....
    >>
    >> I'm in Pukekohe and the UHF signal's always been marhinal around
    >> here. I was told yesterday that out closest transmitter is in the
    >> Waitakere ranges (and all the antennas that I can see seem to be
    >> pointing that way) and that, even with a high-gain antenna the best
    >> this guy could get is 27% signal strength. I have an old Sky high-gain
    >> UHF antenna from back in my pre-injury
    >> days, back when I used to get Sky for the F1. It was set up here in
    >> Puke and the picture was quite acceptable. However, now it's in my
    >> shed and one of the 12 clip-in X shaped bits has been missing for a
    >> long time. (I took the antenna with me as the house was being
    >> removed after I moved out - I know you're supposed to leave them but
    >> ... anyway.) Do you think the missing X piece make much difference? I'm
    >> basically
    >> trying to work out if it's worth me trying to set this thing up (now
    >> I have a TV with a built-in Freeview tuner). As I usually watch very
    >> little TV - at most the first part of 3 News maybe twice, three
    >> times a week - I've been making do with amplified bunny-ears. It's
    >> barely sufficient for channels 2, 3 and 4 but, despite this thing
    >> having a dedicated UHF loop (as well as the 'ears') I don't have any
    >> luck with any digital or analogue UHF channels. D'ya reckon it's worth me
    >> trying this old Sky high-gain thing? It's
    >> a bit rusty (the reflector screens or whatever they are) and, as
    >> mentioned, one X is missing. However I'm currently not in a position
    >> to buy a new one, or get a professional to 'do an install' so I'm
    >> considering calling in my favours with the neighbour and putting
    >> this old thing up. I have some fairly new co-ax, just long enough if
    >> I put it on the roof right above my bedroom. What say you (and anyone
    >> else who might know)? I'd hate to call in my
    >> favours for nothing - I've been banking them for a while in case I
    >> need help with something that's difficult for me to do alone, or
    >> indeed having the neighbour do something for me entirely. Is it
    >> likely to work? Is that missing element going to make a big
    >> difference? As they clip in (and out) where would it be best to
    >> leave a gap on the length of the antenna? Thanks very much in advance.
    >> :)

    >
    > First of all I know SFA, but as I understand it: the aerial consists
    > of a reflector,(at the back) a dipole,(second from back) and a number of
    > directional arrays. If it is just one of the arrays missing it should
    > still pick up a signal. Just not as effectivly. I think the critical
    > point is the connection of the co-ax to the dipole.
    >
    > (Someone with more knowledge can chip-in here and correctly name the
    > parts)
    > If it doesn't work I've got an old UHF aerial hanging out in the trees
    > somewhere which I can drop it in mid-June when I go up for my
    > granddaughter's birthday.


    Thanks heaps for the offer mate, I'll see how things go, might have to take
    you up on it. :)

    I x-posted this to nz.tech so hopefully, as you say, someone with a bit more
    knowledge might be able to help out.

    Yes, what I have missing is one (of 12) X-shaped 'arrays' from in front of
    the dipole. There's still 11 there, it was the longest UHF aerial that I'd
    seen at the time I got it.

    Cheers,
    --
    Shaun.

    "Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
    cozy little classification in the DSM."
    David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
     
    ~misfit~, May 16, 2012
    #12
  13. John S

    Dave Doe Guest

    In article <>, ,
    Gordon says...
    >
    > On 2012-05-15, John S <> wrote:
    > > I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a digital
    > > TV setup involves computers :)
    > >
    > > Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    > > over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to see
    > > if I can manage a DIY changeover.
    > >
    > > 1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.
    > >
    > > I've been told that satellite has not as good quality as terrestrial, and
    > > is also subject to rain fade.
    > > But does satellite have any advantages?

    >
    > You can get reception in places Teressitial does know even exist.( This is
    > why the West Coast is going Digital first with Hawkes Bay.)
    >
    > > For example, with a satellite dish do you have the opportunity to receive
    > > free programmes that are not broadcast over the terrestrial system?
    > > And, if so, do you need a separate dish for each satellite you want to
    > > listen to?

    >
    > No, you just move the dish. Just like a radio telescope. However I think NZ
    > has only one satelite, so question is rather point less. Thinking about it
    > these sats do not cost a few dollars each so they better work hard.


    One satellite? Isn't it a different satellite from the Sky one (by
    about 1.5 degrees)?

    OK, I know if you're on the Sky satellite, you'd just use that for your
    Freeview as well as they carry most of the Freeview channels (don't
    they?)

    I don't watch TV, so I tend not to know this chit :)

    --
    Duncan.
     
    Dave Doe, May 16, 2012
    #13
  14. On Wed, 16 May 2012 22:59:17 +1200, Dave Doe <> wrote:

    >In article <>, ,
    >Gordon says...
    >>
    >> On 2012-05-15, John S <> wrote:
    >> > I suppose this is a bit on the fringes for nz.comp, but I guess a digital
    >> > TV setup involves computers :)
    >> >
    >> > Anyway, I'm thinking I must get round to doing something about switching
    >> > over from my analogue system, and wanting to find out a few things to see
    >> > if I can manage a DIY changeover.
    >> >
    >> > 1. Relative benefits of terrestrial vs satellite.
    >> >
    >> > I've been told that satellite has not as good quality as terrestrial, and
    >> > is also subject to rain fade.
    >> > But does satellite have any advantages?

    >>
    >> You can get reception in places Teressitial does know even exist.( This is
    >> why the West Coast is going Digital first with Hawkes Bay.)
    >>
    >> > For example, with a satellite dish do you have the opportunity to receive
    >> > free programmes that are not broadcast over the terrestrial system?
    >> > And, if so, do you need a separate dish for each satellite you want to
    >> > listen to?

    >>
    >> No, you just move the dish. Just like a radio telescope. However I think NZ
    >> has only one satelite, so question is rather point less. Thinking about it
    >> these sats do not cost a few dollars each so they better work hard.

    >
    >One satellite? Isn't it a different satellite from the Sky one (by
    >about 1.5 degrees)?
    >
    >OK, I know if you're on the Sky satellite, you'd just use that for your
    >Freeview as well as they carry most of the Freeview channels (don't
    >they?)
    >
    >I don't watch TV, so I tend not to know this chit :)


    No, it is just different transponders on the same satellite, Optus D1.
    This is what is on Optus D1:

    www.lyngsat.com/Optus-D1.html

    But not all of those transponders are pointed at NZ. Each has a
    different footprint where it can be received.
     
    Stephen Worthington, May 16, 2012
    #14
  15. John S

    Geopelia Guest

    We are eligible for the freebees. Aged, community card and under the
    financial limits.
    Does anybody know when that scheme will be started?

    I think Auckland is going to be the last place changed over. We are in line
    of sight to the Waitakeres.

    I'm not going to climb on the roof, and I wouldn't have a clue what to do
    anyway.
    Our recorder uses tapes. I suppose we will have to get a new one.

    Geopelia
     
    Geopelia, May 22, 2012
    #15
  16. John S

    Dave Doe Guest

    In article <jpfure$dk4$>, , Geopelia
    says...
    >
    > We are eligible for the freebees. Aged, community card and under the
    > financial limits.
    > Does anybody know when that scheme will be started?
    >
    > I think Auckland is going to be the last place changed over. We are in line
    > of sight to the Waitakeres.
    >
    > I'm not going to climb on the roof, and I wouldn't have a clue what to do
    > anyway.
    > Our recorder uses tapes. I suppose we will have to get a new one.
    >
    > Geopelia


    This page should answer most of your questions I'd hope...

    http://www.goingdigital.co.nz/targeted-assistance-package

    I see there's a downloadable .pdf brochure on the page (on the right-
    hand side). Download it and have a read up on that.


    You need a UHF aerial - but the assistance package should help you sort
    that. They look like the one on the left as shown here...
    http://www.freeviewnz.tv/freeview.aspx


    --
    Duncan.
     
    Dave Doe, May 22, 2012
    #16
  17. John S

    Enkidu Guest

    On 22/05/12 23:55, Geopelia wrote:
    > We are eligible for the freebees. Aged, community card and under the
    > financial limits.
    > Does anybody know when that scheme will be started?
    >
    > I think Auckland is going to be the last place changed over. We are in line
    > of sight to the Waitakeres.
    >
    > I'm not going to climb on the roof, and I wouldn't have a clue what to do
    > anyway.
    > Our recorder uses tapes. I suppose we will have to get a new one.
    >

    It depends on the freeview box that you get. I've not researched it, but
    the freeview box is what takes the signal and extracts the channel
    information and data from it. It then passes it to the TV or whatever
    other equipment you connect to it. The signal for the TV is digital if
    the TV itself is digital or analogue to drive the old analogue TVs. You
    can put a VCR between the freeview box's analogue output if it has one
    and the TV as you probably do now.

    Otherwise if you go fully digital you can get a freeview receiver with
    integrated recorder, but they cost quite a bit, I think. They record to
    a disk exactly the same as the one in your PC, not to tape.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, May 22, 2012
    #17
  18. John S

    Enkidu Guest

    On 23/05/12 00:34, Dave Doe wrote:
    > In article<jpfure$dk4$>, , Geopelia
    > says...
    >>
    >> We are eligible for the freebees. Aged, community card and under the
    >> financial limits.
    >> Does anybody know when that scheme will be started?
    >>
    >> I think Auckland is going to be the last place changed over. We are in line
    >> of sight to the Waitakeres.
    >>
    >> I'm not going to climb on the roof, and I wouldn't have a clue what to do
    >> anyway.
    >> Our recorder uses tapes. I suppose we will have to get a new one.
    >>
    >> Geopelia

    >
    > This page should answer most of your questions I'd hope...
    >
    > http://www.goingdigital.co.nz/targeted-assistance-package
    >
    > I see there's a downloadable .pdf brochure on the page (on the right-
    > hand side). Download it and have a read up on that.
    >

    That answers Geo's question about recording at the bottom right.
    >
    > You need a UHF aerial - but the assistance package should help you sort
    > that. They look like the one on the left as shown here...
    > http://www.freeviewnz.tv/freeview.aspx
    >
    >

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, May 22, 2012
    #18
  19. John S

    Dave Doe Guest

    In article <>, ,
    Enkidu says...
    >
    > On 23/05/12 00:34, Dave Doe wrote:
    > > In article<jpfure$dk4$>, , Geopelia
    > > says...
    > >>
    > >> We are eligible for the freebees. Aged, community card and under the
    > >> financial limits.
    > >> Does anybody know when that scheme will be started?
    > >>
    > >> I think Auckland is going to be the last place changed over. We are in line
    > >> of sight to the Waitakeres.
    > >>
    > >> I'm not going to climb on the roof, and I wouldn't have a clue what to do
    > >> anyway.
    > >> Our recorder uses tapes. I suppose we will have to get a new one.
    > >>
    > >> Geopelia

    > >
    > > This page should answer most of your questions I'd hope...
    > >
    > > http://www.goingdigital.co.nz/targeted-assistance-package
    > >
    > > I see there's a downloadable .pdf brochure on the page (on the right-
    > > hand side). Download it and have a read up on that.
    > >

    > That answers Geo's question about recording at the bottom right.


    Indeed, thanks Cliff. Direct link is:
    http://www.goingdigital.co.nz/uploads/downloads/TAP operational%
    20guidelines.pdf

    Looks like you can apply as of May 1st Geo. Better give 'em a call:
    0800 838 800

    --
    Duncan.
     
    Dave Doe, May 23, 2012
    #19
  20. On Wed, 23 May 2012 09:36:52 +1200, Enkidu
    <> wrote:

    >On 22/05/12 23:55, Geopelia wrote:
    >> We are eligible for the freebees. Aged, community card and under the
    >> financial limits.
    >> Does anybody know when that scheme will be started?
    >>
    >> I think Auckland is going to be the last place changed over. We are in line
    >> of sight to the Waitakeres.
    >>
    >> I'm not going to climb on the roof, and I wouldn't have a clue what to do
    >> anyway.
    >> Our recorder uses tapes. I suppose we will have to get a new one.
    >>

    >It depends on the freeview box that you get. I've not researched it, but
    >the freeview box is what takes the signal and extracts the channel
    >information and data from it. It then passes it to the TV or whatever
    >other equipment you connect to it. The signal for the TV is digital if
    >the TV itself is digital or analogue to drive the old analogue TVs. You
    >can put a VCR between the freeview box's analogue output if it has one
    >and the TV as you probably do now.
    >
    >Otherwise if you go fully digital you can get a freeview receiver with
    >integrated recorder, but they cost quite a bit, I think. They record to
    >a disk exactly the same as the one in your PC, not to tape.
    >
    >Cheers,
    >
    >Cliff




    Go for a DishTV T1050 cost me some $298 from memory (Sale) has a
    500Gb HD and Twin tuners.

    So easy to record from the EPG this would be one of the cheaper
    options, 10 times better than using a VCR no timers to set up, unless
    you are trying to record CH8 TV3+1

    Set top boxes suffer a lot from Interference like Analog channels and
    Cell towers, can depend on brand..

    I had to use a Band pass filter on mine, I do have a bunch of Cell phone
    towers about 200m from here, and Telecom XT network is in the upper UHF
    band 850Mhz or the Prime TV, this Filter cuts them all out.
     
    Frank Williams, May 23, 2012
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Donnie

    "Saving " Digital Photos - advice please

    Donnie, Dec 21, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    26
    Views:
    794
    Donald Link
    Jan 6, 2004
  2. Kevin Duggan

    Advice on buying 1st Digital camera please

    Kevin Duggan, Jan 19, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    852
    Tracy
    Jan 24, 2004
  3. Mark Panszky

    advice on switching from 35 mm SLR to digital please

    Mark Panszky, Jun 22, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    19
    Views:
    685
    Dan Pidcock
    Jul 2, 2004
  4. 2.com

    Advice Please: Digital Camera For 8 X 10 Prints

    2.com, Sep 16, 2005, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    408
    Ron Baird
    Sep 19, 2005
  5. Tapi Himiona

    digital camera wanted to buy: advice please

    Tapi Himiona, Jan 11, 2004, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    113
    Views:
    1,628
    Tom Parker
    Jan 19, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page