Advice: Beer damaged digital camera.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by KN4665, Oct 23, 2004.

  1. KN4665

    KN4665 Guest

    Hi group - first post here.
    Just downloaded all messages but failed to find any answers. Apologies if
    I've missed any, and if I'm in the wrong group or there is a more relevant
    group Ishoud post in, I'd appreciate someone pointing me in the right
    direction, cheers.

    I've been shooting only on an amateur level with a Sony Cybershot P-71 for a
    major recording artist for whom I run a website.
    We do have pro shooters, but these shots I take go straight up into the
    messageboard for the fans to see, usually on the same night of the concerts
    and we have been very pleased with them.
    Last night whilst in the photo pit a pint of beer hit me and my Cybershot,
    wiping it out completely. A message came up on the LCD screen along the
    lines of 'Shut Camera Off' which I did - the lens remained out and open.
    I've only tried to switch it back on once, and the unit made noises like it
    was trying to run back the lens, but fails.
    One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar warm
    area for a few days.
    Whilst I'm happy to give this a go before I ring the insurance company, I
    was wondering if anyone has had any similar experiences and could suggest
    anything further, or tell me of any (hopefully ) successful recoveries.


    Many thanks in advance for any pointers and your time.
    KN4665, Oct 23, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. KN4665 wrote:
    > Hi group - first post here.
    > Just downloaded all messages but failed to find any answers. Apologies if
    > I've missed any, and if I'm in the wrong group or there is a more relevant
    > group Ishoud post in, I'd appreciate someone pointing me in the right
    > direction, cheers.
    >
    > I've been shooting only on an amateur level with a Sony Cybershot P-71 for
    > a
    > major recording artist for whom I run a website.
    > We do have pro shooters, but these shots I take go straight up into the
    > messageboard for the fans to see, usually on the same night of the
    > concerts
    > and we have been very pleased with them.
    > Last night whilst in the photo pit a pint of beer hit me and my Cybershot,
    > wiping it out completely. A message came up on the LCD screen along the
    > lines of 'Shut Camera Off' which I did - the lens remained out and open.
    > I've only tried to switch it back on once, and the unit made noises like
    > it
    > was trying to run back the lens, but fails.
    > One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    > water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar warm
    > area for a few days.
    > Whilst I'm happy to give this a go before I ring the insurance company, I
    > was wondering if anyone has had any similar experiences and could suggest
    > anything further, or tell me of any (hopefully ) successful recoveries.
    >
    >
    > Many thanks in advance for any pointers and your time.


    You were given good advice. I might contact the insurance company
    first, but you really don't want to wait before trying that advice.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    Joseph Meehan, Oct 23, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. KN4665

    KN4665 Guest

    "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote in message
    news:zWyed.26735$...
    > KN4665 wrote:


    <snip>

    > > Last night whilst in the photo pit a pint of beer hit me and my

    Cybershot,
    > > wiping it out completely. A message came up on the LCD screen along the
    > > lines of 'Shut Camera Off' which I did - the lens remained out and open.
    > > I've only tried to switch it back on once, and the unit made noises like
    > > it
    > > was trying to run back the lens, but fails.
    > > One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    > > water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar

    warm
    > > area for a few days.
    > > Whilst I'm happy to give this a go before I ring the insurance company,

    I
    > > was wondering if anyone has had any similar experiences and could

    suggest
    > > anything further, or tell me of any (hopefully ) successful recoveries.
    > >
    > >
    > > Many thanks in advance for any pointers and your time.

    >



    > You were given good advice. I might contact the insurance company
    > first, but you really don't want to wait before trying that advice.
    >
    > --
    > Joseph E. Meehan



    Thank you Joseph.
    I have been Googling for most of tonight and get the impression the longer I
    leave it, the less chance there is of a recovery.
    General advice is to dunk it in clean water for some time, and then again in
    a new batch of clean water - leave to dry for a good time.

    I'm told the band's insurance will probably cover me irrespective of the
    outcome as a goodwill gesture, even if my insurance proves to be useless -
    so I will give it a go.

    Thanks for the reply.
    KN4665, Oct 23, 2004
    #3
  4. KN4665

    Prometheus Guest

    In article <>, KN4665
    <> writes
    >Hi group - first post here.
    >Just downloaded all messages but failed to find any answers. Apologies if
    >I've missed any, and if I'm in the wrong group or there is a more relevant
    >group Ishoud post in, I'd appreciate someone pointing me in the right
    >direction, cheers.
    >
    >I've been shooting only on an amateur level with a Sony Cybershot P-71 for a
    >major recording artist for whom I run a website.
    >We do have pro shooters, but these shots I take go straight up into the
    >messageboard for the fans to see, usually on the same night of the concerts
    >and we have been very pleased with them.
    >Last night whilst in the photo pit a pint of beer hit me and my Cybershot,
    >wiping it out completely. A message came up on the LCD screen along the
    >lines of 'Shut Camera Off' which I did - the lens remained out and open.
    >I've only tried to switch it back on once, and the unit made noises like it
    >was trying to run back the lens, but fails.
    >One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    >water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar warm
    >area for a few days.
    >Whilst I'm happy to give this a go before I ring the insurance company, I
    >was wondering if anyone has had any similar experiences and could suggest
    >anything further, or tell me of any (hopefully ) successful recoveries.


    The advice is sound, beer is a quite nasty, sticky, conductive liquid,
    if the beer got inside you will have to dismantle it and wash it with
    de-ionised water, tap water will do as a first wash but contains
    dissolved (and suspended) salts which will also do harm. My experience
    was with a radio, far less mechanics, although I did have to dismantle
    several switches to clean them, I also have a good selection of cleaning
    solvents in the lab so I could do a good job on it.

    --
    Ian G8ILZ
    Prometheus, Oct 23, 2004
    #4
  5. KN4665

    C J Campbell Guest

    The advice you were given is your only chance, but odds are the camera is
    ruined. The battery should be discarded as well. It might seem OK, but it is
    likely to short out and overheat at some time in the future.
    C J Campbell, Oct 23, 2004
    #5
  6. KN4665

    KN4665 Guest

    "C J Campbell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The advice you were given is your only chance, but odds are the camera is
    > ruined. The battery should be discarded as well. It might seem OK, but it

    is
    > likely to short out and overheat at some time in the future.
    >
    >


    Hi CJ,

    I'm presuming you mean the rechargeables I use with the camera and not an
    internal one ( if there is one. Not apparently user replaceable if so ).
    A good point, and one I hadn't thought of, thanks.

    On a plus side, I'm reasonably sure the memory stick was undamaged, but
    couldn't be certain.
    Perhaps I should give the card the water treatment too?
    I'm not *that* bothered about the card and it's contents, but anything is a
    plus at this stage.
    KN4665, Oct 23, 2004
    #6
  7. KN4665

    KN4665 Guest

    "Prometheus" <Prometheus@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    news:pu$...
    > In article <>, KN4665
    > <> writes
    > >Hi group - first post here.
    > >Just downloaded all messages but failed to find any answers. Apologies if
    > >I've missed any, and if I'm in the wrong group or there is a more

    relevant
    > >group Ishoud post in, I'd appreciate someone pointing me in the right
    > >direction, cheers.
    > >
    > >I've been shooting only on an amateur level with a Sony Cybershot P-71

    for a
    > >major recording artist for whom I run a website.
    > >We do have pro shooters, but these shots I take go straight up into the
    > >messageboard for the fans to see, usually on the same night of the

    concerts
    > >and we have been very pleased with them.
    > >Last night whilst in the photo pit a pint of beer hit me and my

    Cybershot,
    > >wiping it out completely. A message came up on the LCD screen along the
    > >lines of 'Shut Camera Off' which I did - the lens remained out and open.
    > >I've only tried to switch it back on once, and the unit made noises like

    it
    > >was trying to run back the lens, but fails.
    > >One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    > >water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar

    warm
    > >area for a few days.
    > >Whilst I'm happy to give this a go before I ring the insurance company, I
    > >was wondering if anyone has had any similar experiences and could suggest
    > >anything further, or tell me of any (hopefully ) successful recoveries.

    >



    > The advice is sound, beer is a quite nasty, sticky, conductive liquid,
    > if the beer got inside you will have to dismantle it and wash it with
    > de-ionised water, tap water will do as a first wash but contains
    > dissolved (and suspended) salts which will also do harm. My experience
    > was with a radio, far less mechanics, although I did have to dismantle
    > several switches to clean them, I also have a good selection of cleaning
    > solvents in the lab so I could do a good job on it.
    >
    > --
    > Ian G8ILZ


    Hi Ian,

    Wow. De-ionised water? Crikey!
    Ok, I'll try to source that then.
    I'm a bit loathe to dismantle the unit, it looks as if it could be quite
    tricky - however, if it needs doing so be it.

    Great advice again - you guys are too kind.
    KN4665, Oct 23, 2004
    #7
  8. KN4665

    gm Guest

    "Prometheus" <Prometheus@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    news:pu$...
    > In article <>, KN4665
    > <> writes
    > >Hi group - first post here.
    > >Just downloaded all messages but failed to find any answers. Apologies if
    > >I've missed any, and if I'm in the wrong group or there is a more

    relevant
    > >group Ishoud post in, I'd appreciate someone pointing me in the right
    > >direction, cheers.
    > >
    > >I've been shooting only on an amateur level with a Sony Cybershot P-71

    for a
    > >major recording artist for whom I run a website.
    > >We do have pro shooters, but these shots I take go straight up into the
    > >messageboard for the fans to see, usually on the same night of the

    concerts
    > >and we have been very pleased with them.
    > >Last night whilst in the photo pit a pint of beer hit me and my

    Cybershot,
    > >wiping it out completely. A message came up on the LCD screen along the
    > >lines of 'Shut Camera Off' which I did - the lens remained out and open.
    > >I've only tried to switch it back on once, and the unit made noises like

    it
    > >was trying to run back the lens, but fails.
    > >One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    > >water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar

    warm
    > >area for a few days.
    > >Whilst I'm happy to give this a go before I ring the insurance company, I
    > >was wondering if anyone has had any similar experiences and could suggest
    > >anything further, or tell me of any (hopefully ) successful recoveries.

    >
    > The advice is sound, beer is a quite nasty, sticky, conductive liquid,
    > if the beer got inside you will have to dismantle it and wash it with
    > de-ionised water, tap water will do as a first wash but contains
    > dissolved (and suspended) salts which will also do harm. My experience
    > was with a radio, far less mechanics, although I did have to dismantle
    > several switches to clean them, I also have a good selection of cleaning
    > solvents in the lab so I could do a good job on it.
    >
    > --
    > Ian G8ILZ


    Before I dunk it in water I would take the memory card out and if the unit
    has a backup battery make sure you remove that also before you dunk it.

    After the unit is dry you might have to clean the pick up.

    I have been a repair technician for about 20 years (not cameras) and in my
    past experiences when a piece of equipment has been douced with any liquid
    that contains sugar even if you clean it up, dry it off, and get it to work
    again, about six months to a year later you might start to have problems
    where buttons stick and controls don't work right, what I'm trying to say is
    I would call the insurance company and have it replaced because the unit
    will not be the same as it was before the incident.

    Hope this helps.

    Gary
    gm, Oct 23, 2004
    #8
  9. KN4665

    KN4665 Guest

    "gm" <> wrote in message
    news:6yzed.5753$...
    >
    > "Prometheus" <Prometheus@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    > news:pu$...
    > > In article <>, KN4665
    > > <> writes


    <snip>

    > > >Last night whilst in the photo pit a pint of beer hit me and my

    > Cybershot,
    > > >wiping it out completely. A message came up on the LCD screen along the
    > > >lines of 'Shut Camera Off' which I did - the lens remained out and

    open.
    > > >I've only tried to switch it back on once, and the unit made noises

    like
    > it
    > > >was trying to run back the lens, but fails.
    > > >One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run

    cold
    > > >water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar

    > warm
    > > >area for a few days.
    > > >Whilst I'm happy to give this a go before I ring the insurance company,

    I
    > > >was wondering if anyone has had any similar experiences and could

    suggest
    > > >anything further, or tell me of any (hopefully ) successful recoveries.

    > >



    > > The advice is sound, beer is a quite nasty, sticky, conductive liquid,
    > > if the beer got inside you will have to dismantle it and wash it with
    > > de-ionised water, tap water will do as a first wash but contains
    > > dissolved (and suspended) salts which will also do harm. My experience
    > > was with a radio, far less mechanics, although I did have to dismantle
    > > several switches to clean them, I also have a good selection of cleaning
    > > solvents in the lab so I could do a good job on it.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Ian G8ILZ

    >



    > Before I dunk it in water I would take the memory card out and if the unit
    > has a backup battery make sure you remove that also before you dunk it.
    >
    > After the unit is dry you might have to clean the pick up.
    >
    > I have been a repair technician for about 20 years (not cameras) and in my
    > past experiences when a piece of equipment has been douced with any liquid
    > that contains sugar even if you clean it up, dry it off, and get it to

    work
    > again, about six months to a year later you might start to have problems
    > where buttons stick and controls don't work right, what I'm trying to say

    is
    > I would call the insurance company and have it replaced because the unit
    > will not be the same as it was before the incident.
    >
    > Hope this helps.
    >
    > Gary
    >
    >
    >


    Yes, it does help, Gary.
    Thanks a million.
    I'm hoping if the band/management *do* help to pay for a new unit, I could
    use this as a backup ( or to use at that venue again! ), if I have any luck
    recovering.

    Thanks again.
    KN4665, Oct 23, 2004
    #9
  10. KN4665

    Ed Ruf Guest

    On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 21:45:10 +0100, in rec.photo.digital "KN4665"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >Wow. De-ionised water? Crikey!
    >Ok, I'll try to source that then.


    If not, then distilled is still better than from the tap.
    ________________________________________________________
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    http://EdwardGRuf.com
    Ed Ruf, Oct 23, 2004
    #10
  11. > One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    > water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar warm
    > area for a few days.


    This is as likely to work as anything, but I'd say there's maybe a 30%
    chance of success.

    The camera may develop corroded contacts later.

    I'd suggest using distilled water for the last rinse.
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 23, 2004
    #11
  12. KN4665

    KN4665 Guest

    "Ed Ruf" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 21:45:10 +0100, in rec.photo.digital "KN4665"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >Wow. De-ionised water? Crikey!
    > >Ok, I'll try to source that then.

    >



    > If not, then distilled is still better than from the tap.



    Thanks Ed.
    Noted.
    KN4665, Oct 23, 2004
    #12
  13. KN4665

    Prometheus Guest

    In article <>, KN4665
    <> writes
    >
    >"Prometheus" <Prometheus@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    >news:pu$...

    --------Cut----
    >> The advice is sound, beer is a quite nasty, sticky, conductive liquid,
    >> if the beer got inside you will have to dismantle it and wash it with
    >> de-ionised water, tap water will do as a first wash but contains
    >> dissolved (and suspended) salts which will also do harm. My experience
    >> was with a radio, far less mechanics, although I did have to dismantle
    >> several switches to clean them, I also have a good selection of cleaning
    >> solvents in the lab so I could do a good job on it.

    >
    >Hi Ian,
    >
    >Wow. De-ionised water? Crikey!
    >Ok, I'll try to source that then.
    >I'm a bit loathe to dismantle the unit, it looks as if it could be quite
    >tricky - however, if it needs doing so be it.


    Basically, de-ionised is the water sold for topping-up a battery, You
    might be reluctant to dismantle it but since the alternative is throwing
    it away what have you got to lose apart from some time. Given the cost
    and age I would probably view it as an opportunity to buy a newer better
    model.

    --
    Ian G8ILZ
    Prometheus, Oct 24, 2004
    #13
  14. KN4665

    Prometheus Guest

    In article <6yzed.5753$>, gm
    <> writes
    >
    >"Prometheus" <Prometheus@127.0.0.1> wrote in message
    >news:pu$...
    >> In article <>, KN4665
    >> <> writes
    >> >Hi group - first post here.
    >> >Just downloaded all messages but failed to find any answers. Apologies if
    >> >I've missed any, and if I'm in the wrong group or there is a more

    >relevant
    >> >group Ishoud post in, I'd appreciate someone pointing me in the right
    >> >direction, cheers.
    >> >
    >> >I've been shooting only on an amateur level with a Sony Cybershot P-71

    >for a
    >> >major recording artist for whom I run a website.
    >> >We do have pro shooters, but these shots I take go straight up into the
    >> >messageboard for the fans to see, usually on the same night of the

    >concerts
    >> >and we have been very pleased with them.
    >> >Last night whilst in the photo pit a pint of beer hit me and my

    >Cybershot,
    >> >wiping it out completely. A message came up on the LCD screen along the
    >> >lines of 'Shut Camera Off' which I did - the lens remained out and open.
    >> >I've only tried to switch it back on once, and the unit made noises like

    >it
    >> >was trying to run back the lens, but fails.
    >> >One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    >> >water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar

    >warm
    >> >area for a few days.
    >> >Whilst I'm happy to give this a go before I ring the insurance company, I
    >> >was wondering if anyone has had any similar experiences and could suggest
    >> >anything further, or tell me of any (hopefully ) successful recoveries.

    >>
    >> The advice is sound, beer is a quite nasty, sticky, conductive liquid,
    >> if the beer got inside you will have to dismantle it and wash it with
    >> de-ionised water, tap water will do as a first wash but contains
    >> dissolved (and suspended) salts which will also do harm. My experience
    >> was with a radio, far less mechanics, although I did have to dismantle
    >> several switches to clean them, I also have a good selection of cleaning
    >> solvents in the lab so I could do a good job on it.

    >
    >Before I dunk it in water I would take the memory card out and if the unit
    >has a backup battery make sure you remove that also before you dunk it.
    >
    >After the unit is dry you might have to clean the pick up.
    >
    >I have been a repair technician for about 20 years (not cameras) and in my
    >past experiences when a piece of equipment has been douced with any liquid
    >that contains sugar even if you clean it up, dry it off, and get it to work
    >again, about six months to a year later you might start to have problems
    >where buttons stick and controls don't work right, what I'm trying to say is
    >I would call the insurance company and have it replaced because the unit
    >will not be the same as it was before the incident.


    It can be as 'new', but it needs a lot of work. If it is insured let the
    insurance pay, otherwise you have noting but time to lose. My radio, a
    2m handheld transceiver actually, was not insured against such damage
    but my time was free.

    --
    Ian G8ILZ
    Prometheus, Oct 24, 2004
    #14
  15. KN4665

    DHB Guest

    KN4665,
    the advice you have been given is largely very good. About
    15 years ago when I was working for Lorain Telecommunications & Power
    Systems as an "Service Engineer" (Glorified name for an "Electronic
    Technician" (ET) working in field service, I received this information
    & question by phone from a client in NY.

    He informed me that the bran new, uninstalled UPS
    (Uninterruptible Power Supply) & 2 new uninstalled 48VDC 50A
    rectifiers (19" Rack Mounted Industrial Battery Chargers) had gotten
    wet. The skyscraper they were to be installed in was undergoing major
    renovations & a contractor turned on the water to the new sprinkler
    system but somebody forgot to install the sprinkler head just above
    the equipment in this room, so it got wet before they figured out
    there was a problem.

    The question then was: "What needs to be done to insure
    reliability of this equipment?"

    My answer: "The only way to insure reliability would be to
    replace any equipment that got wet because even though it is new & was
    un-powered at the time, problems might not reveal themselves for
    weeks, months or even years down the road."

    His response was: "That's what my engineers have told me as
    well. Duplicate my equipment order & it will be billed to the
    insurance company." Additionally he requested my response in writing
    to submit to the insurance company, which I provided to him & further
    explained some of the reasons why this equipment would never again be
    reliable.

    This equipment cost several thousand US dollars & it was
    replaced & covered by the insurance company without any additional
    question due to my official written statement & that of his own
    engineers.

    Any impurities in the water might cause oxidation (corrosion)
    almost anywhere over time. Additionally even a tiny amount of
    slightly conductive residue in the wrong place on a circuit board,
    connector, switch.......etc. could cause erratic & intermittent
    problems over time.

    The short version, if you can have the insurance company
    replace it, that's the way to go. If they want the damaged 1, give it
    to them. If they don't want it & it works after cleaning it out as
    best you can, consider yourself lucky & consider it to be operating on
    borrowed time. Thus use it as much as possible before problems begin,
    but have it's replacement ready as there is no way of knowing when
    it's likely to fail. Hopefully you will get a year or more out of it
    but I would not bank on it.

    Respectfully, DHB


    "To announce that there must be no criticism of the President,
    or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong,
    is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable
    to the American public."----Theodore Roosevelt, May 7, 1918
    DHB, Oct 24, 2004
    #15
  16. KN4665

    Colin D Guest

    KN4665 wrote:

    > Hi group - first post here.
    > Just downloaded all messages but failed to find any answers. Apologies if
    > I've missed any, and if I'm in the wrong group or there is a more relevant
    > group Ishoud post in, I'd appreciate someone pointing me in the right
    > direction, cheers.
    >
    > I've been shooting only on an amateur level with a Sony Cybershot P-71 for a
    > major recording artist for whom I run a website.
    > We do have pro shooters, but these shots I take go straight up into the
    > messageboard for the fans to see, usually on the same night of the concerts
    > and we have been very pleased with them.
    > Last night whilst in the photo pit a pint of beer hit me and my Cybershot,
    > wiping it out completely. A message came up on the LCD screen along the
    > lines of 'Shut Camera Off' which I did - the lens remained out and open.
    > I've only tried to switch it back on once, and the unit made noises like it
    > was trying to run back the lens, but fails.
    > One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    > water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar warm
    > area for a few days.
    > Whilst I'm happy to give this a go before I ring the insurance company, I
    > was wondering if anyone has had any similar experiences and could suggest
    > anything further, or tell me of any (hopefully ) successful recoveries.
    >
    > Many thanks in advance for any pointers and your time.


    Hold everything!! Despite the advice already given, with the best of
    intentions, I would do *nothing* to the camera before contacting your insurance
    company. Most ins. co's are likely to refuse a claim if you have subsequently
    interfered with the damaged item, on the grounds that it may have been fixable
    before unskilled work was performed on it, e.g. submerging in water and/or
    opening it up. Further, your best outcome here would be to try for a new
    camera, rather than fixing this one. Almost all cameras that have been wet will
    subsequently corrode internally, at which point you may not be insured. Most
    ins.co's have clauses that eliminate 'gradual' damage as opposed to sudden
    damage, so a claim after six months or more won't be met.

    YMMV, but I would check first.

    Colin
    Colin D, Oct 24, 2004
    #16
  17. KN4665

    JohnR Guest

    "KN4665" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi group - first post here.
    > Just downloaded all messages but failed to find any answers. Apologies if
    > I've missed any, and if I'm in the wrong group or there is a more relevant
    > group Ishoud post in, I'd appreciate someone pointing me in the right
    > direction, cheers.
    >
    > I've been shooting only on an amateur level with a Sony Cybershot P-71 for

    a
    > major recording artist for whom I run a website.
    > We do have pro shooters, but these shots I take go straight up into the
    > messageboard for the fans to see, usually on the same night of the

    concerts
    > and we have been very pleased with them.
    > Last night whilst in the photo pit a pint of beer hit me and my Cybershot,
    > wiping it out completely. A message came up on the LCD screen along the
    > lines of 'Shut Camera Off' which I did - the lens remained out and open.
    > I've only tried to switch it back on once, and the unit made noises like

    it
    > was trying to run back the lens, but fails.
    > One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    > water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar warm
    > area for a few days.
    > Whilst I'm happy to give this a go before I ring the insurance company, I
    > was wondering if anyone has had any similar experiences and could suggest
    > anything further, or tell me of any (hopefully ) successful recoveries.
    >
    >
    > Many thanks in advance for any pointers and your time.
    >

    It's hosed. Even if you got it going, it probably will not work the same, or
    break when you need it. If you in these situations that get equipment beer
    soaked, look for a water resistant model that can be washed off. I believe
    Pentax has such a camera.
    John
    JohnR, Oct 24, 2004
    #17
  18. KN4665

    Roger Guest

    On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 20:50:17 +0100, "KN4665" <>
    wrote:

    >Hi group - first post here.
    >Just downloaded all messages but failed to find any answers. Apologies if
    >I've missed any, and if I'm in the wrong group or there is a more relevant
    >group Ishoud post in, I'd appreciate someone pointing me in the right
    >direction, cheers.
    >

    <snip>

    I think just about everything has been covered except a couple of
    items. I do agree that a dunking is bad enough, but beer, or soda is
    really bad. Even cleaned the CCD is most likely going to have smears
    on it and even if it works it's probably not long for this world.

    In my case my insurance does not cover my cameras when on a job. I
    had to get and pay for additional insurance for that. I've never
    broken a camera on a job, but I've totally trashed 3 over the years.

    I'd contact the insurance company immediately as they may not want the
    camera dismantled without knowing ahead of time, but washing the thing
    out as soon as possible is essential. Washing can't possibly make it
    any worse than beer.

    Good luck!

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com
    Roger, Oct 24, 2004
    #18
  19. KN4665

    SteveB Guest

    "KN4665" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On a plus side, I'm reasonably sure the memory stick was undamaged, but
    > couldn't be certain.
    > Perhaps I should give the card the water treatment too?
    > I'm not *that* bothered about the card and it's contents, but anything is
    > a
    > plus at this stage.


    I can answer that one. A UK magazine tested all the different types of
    memory card to destruction to see how sturdy they are. They easily survived
    immersion in Coke, boiling water, and much physical abuse. About the only
    thing guaranteed to kill them was driving a nail through them.

    >
    >
    SteveB, Oct 24, 2004
    #19
  20. KN4665

    KN4665 Guest

    "Michael A. Covington" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > One of the pro shooters I spoke to told me to remove batteries, run cold
    > > water over the unit and leave to dry in an airing cupboard or similar

    warm
    > > area for a few days.

    >
    > This is as likely to work as anything, but I'd say there's maybe a 30%
    > chance of success.
    >
    > The camera may develop corroded contacts later.
    >
    > I'd suggest using distilled water for the last rinse.
    >
    >


    Ta Michael.
    KN4665, Oct 24, 2004
    #20
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