Advanced Bandwidth Control with Cisco or Netequalizer

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by astormchaser, Jun 16, 2007.

  1. astormchaser

    astormchaser Guest

    Has anybody out there ever used a CIsco router to control incoming
    traffic into their network.

    Some of our customers are claiming that the NetEqualizer is the only
    product that they have seen that can control incoming traffic speeds.
    I am referring to traffic coming into an organization from their
    internet provider.

    -art
     
    astormchaser, Jun 16, 2007
    #1
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  2. astormchaser

    Trendkill Guest

    On Jun 16, 12:42 pm, astormchaser <> wrote:
    > Has anybody out there ever used a CIsco router to control incoming
    > traffic into their network.
    >
    > Some of our customers are claiming that the NetEqualizer is the only
    > product that they have seen that can control incoming traffic speeds.
    > I am referring to traffic coming into an organization from their
    > internet provider.
    >
    > -art


    I don't think that appliance does anything to incoming traffic from a
    provider. It looks like an ad-hoc attempt at an all-in-one QoS/
    Policing/Management appliance. I have used QoS and things like
    Peribit extensively, and none would work on inbound traffic from the
    internet. First of all, you can't do anything to prioritize until it
    hits your edge router, and second, it relies on classification,
    buckets, etc. The traffic from the ISP is not classified for client
    networks...at least right now.

    Now for wan connections that you may be buying from a provider, that
    is a different story. Yes this box could help classify and manage
    bandwidth between sites that you own/manage.

    After reading a good amount on their site, I don't see anything that
    specifically says they manage incoming traffic. What I do see is that
    they claim they can control or 'contain' applications like P2P, etc,
    but this may mean by limiting the outgoing requests or dropping
    packets. The latter is not an effective solution, particularly for
    real time applications or business critical systems. Perhaps for P2P,
    its a good way to control over-usage, but I don't know of any major
    corporation that allows those services in/out of their network to
    begin with.
     
    Trendkill, Jun 16, 2007
    #2
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