ADSL and Apple Mac

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by BackToNormal, Oct 24, 2003.

  1. BackToNormal

    BackToNormal Guest

    Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    running os 9. Do the dick smith ones work? couldnt find anything at
    www.totallymac.com

    thanks
    Dane

    --
    "People do not make decisions on facts, rather,
    how they feel about the facts" Robert Consedine
     
    BackToNormal, Oct 24, 2003
    #1
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  2. BackToNormal

    madknoxie Guest

    In article <1g3dvop.1398mnjaydbcuN%>,
    (BackToNormal) wrote:

    > Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    > running os 9. Do the dick smith ones work? couldnt find anything at
    > www.totallymac.com


    Do you have a network card in your iMac? You could get an ADSL router
    which would mean that you would only have to connect via your network
    card. This would also mean you could connect other computer to the
    network/internet with relative ease.

    --
    madknoxie
    $35 .nz domain names: http://www.ivision.co.nz/
     
    madknoxie, Oct 25, 2003
    #2
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  3. BackToNormal

    Bruce Hoult Guest

    In article <1g3dvop.1398mnjaydbcuN%>,
    (BackToNormal) wrote:

    > Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    > running os 9. Do the dick smith ones work? couldnt find anything at
    > www.totallymac.com


    Anything with an ethernet port will work. Preferably, it should also
    have a web (http) interface for configuring it, rather than a serial
    (console) port.

    -- Bruce
     
    Bruce Hoult, Oct 25, 2003
    #3
  4. BackToNormal

    Bruce Hoult Guest

    In article <>,
    madknoxie <> wrote:

    > In article <1g3dvop.1398mnjaydbcuN%>,
    > (BackToNormal) wrote:
    >
    > > Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    > > running os 9. Do the dick smith ones work? couldnt find anything at
    > > www.totallymac.com

    >
    > Do you have a network card in your iMac?


    Of course he does! Ethernet ports were standard on Macs from the mid
    90's. The first iMac was controversial largely for having *only* power,
    modem, USB and ethernet ports.

    -- Bruce
     
    Bruce Hoult, Oct 25, 2003
    #4
  5. BackToNormal

    madknoxie Guest

    In article <>,
    Bruce Hoult <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > madknoxie <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <1g3dvop.1398mnjaydbcuN%>,
    > > (BackToNormal) wrote:
    > >
    > > > Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    > > > running os 9. Do the dick smith ones work? couldnt find anything at
    > > > www.totallymac.com

    > >
    > > Do you have a network card in your iMac?

    >
    > Of course he does! Ethernet ports were standard on Macs from the mid
    > 90's. The first iMac was controversial largely for having *only* power,
    > modem, USB and ethernet ports.


    I thought that would be the case but I didn't know for sure - weren't
    the 400Mhz ones the first release of the iMac? Do correct me if I'm
    wrong.

    --
    madknoxie
    $35 .nz domain names: http://www.ivision.co.nz/
     
    madknoxie, Oct 25, 2003
    #5
  6. BackToNormal

    back again Guest

    madknoxie <> wrote in
    news::

    > Subject: Re: ADSL and Apple Mac
    > From: madknoxie <>
    > Newsgroups: nz.comp
    >
    > In article <>,
    > Bruce Hoult <> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <>,
    >> madknoxie <> wrote:
    >>
    >> > In article <1g3dvop.1398mnjaydbcuN%>,
    >> > (BackToNormal) wrote:
    >> >
    >> > > Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    >> > > running os 9. Do the dick smith ones work? couldnt find anything
    >> > > at www.totallymac.com
    >> >
    >> > Do you have a network card in your iMac?

    >>
    >> Of course he does! Ethernet ports were standard on Macs from the mid
    >> 90's. The first iMac was controversial largely for having *only*
    >> power, modem, USB and ethernet ports.

    >
    > I thought that would be the case but I didn't know for sure - weren't
    > the 400Mhz ones the first release of the iMac? Do correct me if I'm
    > wrong.




    My old 233MHz iMac has ethernet built in, so does my antique 120MHz
    PowerMac 8500 :)
     
    back again, Oct 25, 2003
    #6
  7. BackToNormal

    Philip Roy Guest

    In article <>,
    madknoxie <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Bruce Hoult <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>,
    > > madknoxie <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <1g3dvop.1398mnjaydbcuN%>,
    > > > (BackToNormal) wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    > > > > running os 9. Do the dick smith ones work? couldnt find anything at
    > > > > www.totallymac.com
    > > >
    > > > Do you have a network card in your iMac?

    > >
    > > Of course he does! Ethernet ports were standard on Macs from the mid
    > > 90's. The first iMac was controversial largely for having *only* power,
    > > modem, USB and ethernet ports.

    >
    > I thought that would be the case but I didn't know for sure - weren't
    > the 400Mhz ones the first release of the iMac? Do correct me if I'm
    > wrong.


    The first iMac (the bondi blue one) did indeed have 10/100BaseT as well
    as a moderately unknown thing (at the time) called 'USB'. No floppy disk
    drive either, yeah!

    Phil
    --
    MacGuide @ NZMac.com :: http://www.macguide.co.nz
    All Mac - All Kiwi
    Supporting the New Zealand Mac Community
     
    Philip Roy, Oct 25, 2003
    #7
  8. BackToNormal

    Philip Roy Guest

    In article <>,
    Bruce Hoult <> wrote:

    > In article <1g3dvop.1398mnjaydbcuN%>,
    > (BackToNormal) wrote:
    >
    > > Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    > > running os 9. Do the dick smith ones work? couldnt find anything at
    > > www.totallymac.com

    >
    > Anything with an ethernet port will work. Preferably, it should also
    > have a web (http) interface for configuring it, rather than a serial
    > (console) port.
    >
    > -- Bruce


    Agree with Bruce there.

    The ADSL router I have (which TotallyMac sell or did sell) is designed
    for a PC but works fine with my Mac running OS X. Looking for ones that
    actually list Mac support on the product would be a plus...I did have an
    issue at one point and the freephone number took me through to the
    States....they didn't actually believe the thing would work with a Mac,
    which was pretty bizarre.

    Phil
    --
    MacGuide @ NZMac.com :: http://www.macguide.co.nz
    All Mac - All Kiwi
    Supporting the New Zealand Mac Community
     
    Philip Roy, Oct 25, 2003
    #8
  9. BackToNormal

    madknoxie Guest

    In article <>,
    Philip Roy <> wrote:

    > > > Of course he does! Ethernet ports were standard on Macs from the mid
    > > > 90's. The first iMac was controversial largely for having *only* power,
    > > > modem, USB and ethernet ports.

    > >
    > > I thought that would be the case but I didn't know for sure - weren't
    > > the 400Mhz ones the first release of the iMac? Do correct me if I'm
    > > wrong.

    >
    > The first iMac (the bondi blue one) did indeed have 10/100BaseT as well
    > as a moderately unknown thing (at the time) called 'USB'. No floppy disk
    > drive either, yeah!


    Heh, I remember how much slack they got on that point. Does anyone, Mac
    or PC, actually use floppies anymore. I was worried when I got my Mac
    that i would miss having a floppy drive, but I haven't needed it at
    all...

    --
    madknoxie
    $35 .nz domain names: http://www.ivision.co.nz/
     
    madknoxie, Oct 25, 2003
    #9
  10. BackToNormal

    Bruce Hoult Guest

    In article <>,
    madknoxie <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Bruce Hoult <> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>,
    > > madknoxie <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <1g3dvop.1398mnjaydbcuN%>,
    > > > (BackToNormal) wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    > > > > running os 9. Do the dick smith ones work? couldnt find anything at
    > > > > www.totallymac.com
    > > >
    > > > Do you have a network card in your iMac?

    > >
    > > Of course he does! Ethernet ports were standard on Macs from the mid
    > > 90's. The first iMac was controversial largely for having *only* power,
    > > modem, USB and ethernet ports.

    >
    > I thought that would be the case but I didn't know for sure - weren't
    > the 400Mhz ones the first release of the iMac? Do correct me if I'm
    > wrong.


    400 MHz was about the 4th or 5th update (and saw the introduction of
    slot loading DVD drives). The iMac started at 233 MHz, then 266, 300,
    350, 400, I think.

    -- Bruce
     
    Bruce Hoult, Oct 25, 2003
    #10
  11. BackToNormal

    Enkidu Guest

    On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 16:23:58 +1300, Philip Roy
    <> wrote:
    >
    >The first iMac (the bondi blue one) did indeed have 10/100BaseT as well
    >as a moderately unknown thing (at the time) called 'USB'. No floppy disk
    >drive either, yeah!
    >

    What about the slot on the front?

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    The complete lack of evidence is the surest sign
    that the conspiracy is working.
     
    Enkidu, Oct 25, 2003
    #11
  12. BackToNormal

    Philip Roy Guest

    In article <>,
    Enkidu <> wrote:

    > >The first iMac (the bondi blue one) did indeed have 10/100BaseT as well
    > >as a moderately unknown thing (at the time) called 'USB'. No floppy disk
    > >drive either, yeah!
    > >

    > What about the slot on the front?
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff


    What slot? There wasn't one. The first iMac (I used to own one) had a
    laptop-like pop-out CD drive. If you are meaning slot-lading CDs...that
    came later.

    Phil
    --
    MacGuide @ NZMac.com :: http://www.macguide.co.nz
    All Mac - All Kiwi
    Supporting the New Zealand Mac Community
     
    Philip Roy, Oct 25, 2003
    #12
  13. BackToNormal

    Enkidu Guest

    On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 20:39:10 +1300, Philip Roy
    <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > Enkidu <> wrote:
    >
    >> >The first iMac (the bondi blue one) did indeed have 10/100BaseT as well
    >> >as a moderately unknown thing (at the time) called 'USB'. No floppy disk
    >> >drive either, yeah!
    >> >

    >> What about the slot on the front?
    >>

    >What slot? There wasn't one. The first iMac (I used to own one) had a
    >laptop-like pop-out CD drive. If you are meaning slot-lading CDs...that
    >came later.
    >

    That's for a CD? No wonder it never worked for me.....<grin>

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    --

    The complete lack of evidence is the surest sign
    that the conspiracy is working.
     
    Enkidu, Oct 25, 2003
    #13
  14. In <> Enkidu wrote:
    > On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 20:39:10 +1300, Philip Roy
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <>,
    >> Enkidu <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> >The first iMac (the bondi blue one) did indeed have 10/100BaseT as
    >>> >well as a moderately unknown thing (at the time) called 'USB'. No
    >>> >floppy disk drive either, yeah!
    >>> What about the slot on the front?
    >>>

    >>What slot? There wasn't one. The first iMac (I used to own one) had a
    >>laptop-like pop-out CD drive. If you are meaning slot-lading CDs...
    >>that came later.

    > That's for a CD? No wonder it never worked for me.....<grin>
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff


    A little known fact about the original iMac is that it still had a
    floppy drive controller, and even pads on the main board to solder a
    connector to. I rigged up a cable once and tried it with the 800KB 3.5"
    floppy drive from my old Apple IIGS. It worked perfectly with the
    original Mac OS 8.1 the iMac came with, but after upgrading to OS 9 it
    was disabled. Spoil sports :-<

    --
    Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand

    PS/2 Mouse Adapter for vintage Apple II or Mac
    order at http://vintageware.orcon.net.nz
     
    Roger Johnstone, Oct 25, 2003
    #14
  15. BackToNormal

    Peter KERR Guest

    In article <>,
    madknoxie <> wrote:
    >
    > Heh, I remember how much slack they got on that point. Does anyone, Mac
    > or PC, actually use floppies anymore. I was worried when I got my Mac
    > that i would miss having a floppy drive, but I haven't needed it at
    > all...
    >


    Only floppies brought in here now are from PC users...
     
    Peter KERR, Oct 26, 2003
    #15
  16. BackToNormal

    Who is this Guest

    In article <1g3dvop.1398mnjaydbcuN%>,
    (BackToNormal) wrote:

    > Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    > running os 9. Do the dick smith ones work? couldnt find anything at
    > www.totallymac.com



    Short answer. YES it will work.

    The iMac has ethernet which is what you need
    The DSE ADSL modem has a web based set up which is easy to use

    I have been running a DSE ADSL modem on my eMac for 6 months with zero
    problems and i have friends who use one on an iMac 333.
     
    Who is this, Oct 26, 2003
    #16
  17. BackToNormal

    Who is this Guest

    In article <>,
    madknoxie <> wrote:

    >
    > I thought that would be the case but I didn't know for sure - weren't
    > the 400Mhz ones the first release of the iMac? Do correct me if I'm
    > wrong.


    You are wrong.
    Rev A was 233 then Rev B was 266 then there was the 333 and 350 and 400's
     
    Who is this, Oct 26, 2003
    #17
  18. BackToNormal

    T.N.O. Guest

    "Peter KERR" wrote
    > > Heh, I remember how much slack they got on that point. Does anyone, Mac
    > > or PC, actually use floppies anymore. I was worried when I got my Mac
    > > that i would miss having a floppy drive, but I haven't needed it at
    > > all...


    > Only floppies brought in here now are from PC users...


    heh, we are in the process of disabling floppy access at work.
     
    T.N.O., Oct 26, 2003
    #18
  19. BackToNormal

    Who is this Guest

    In article <3f9b21e2$>, "T.N.O." <>
    wrote:

    > "Peter KERR" wrote
    > > > Heh, I remember how much slack they got on that point. Does anyone, Mac
    > > > or PC, actually use floppies anymore. I was worried when I got my Mac
    > > > that i would miss having a floppy drive, but I haven't needed it at
    > > > all...

    >
    > > Only floppies brought in here now are from PC users...

    >
    > heh, we are in the process of disabling floppy access at work.
    >
    >


    Haven't used one at all for years, replaced it with
    File sharing over a network
    Zip drives
    CDs
    DVDs
    USB Ram drives

    All of which are more reliable, faster, and better.
     
    Who is this, Oct 26, 2003
    #19
  20. In article <1g3dvop.1398mnjaydbcuN%>,
    (BackToNormal) wrote:

    >Anyone running a adsl modem on a imac g3 400mhz?
    >running os 9.


    Just make sure the ADSL box is a modem/router (as opposed to just a
    modem), and that it has an Ethernet port instead of (or in addition to)
    a USB port. The USB ones may require platform-specific drivers.

    A modem/router will, in addition to basic ADSL connectivity, also
    provide ENAT service (Extended Network Address Translation), which lets
    you share the internet connection among multiple machines, as well as
    DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol), which means your machines
    will automatically be assigned dynamic IP addresses from the private
    range without having to be configured individually.

    >Do the dick smith ones work?


    I bought a D-Link DSL-500 from Dick Smith. The salesperson assured me
    their house-brand box did exactly the same things and cost a little
    less, but I thought I'd stick to a brand I was familiar with, just to be
    safe (I already had a D-Link 8-port switch).

    As for machines I am running, I have a 10-year-old Centris 650 (MacOS
    7.6.1), a 5-year-old beige PowerMac G3 (MacOS 9.0.4), and a
    one-and-a-half-year-old iMac G4/800 (MacOS 9.2.2), all successfully
    accessing the Internet through this setup.

    The only thing that tripped me up was the Ethernet port on the DSL-500
    has its transmit and receive pins swapped. I think the idea is that it
    will plug straight into a single PC with a standard (non-crossover)
    Ethernet cable. Then I was reminded (by the helpful Telecom technician
    on the phone) that my switch has a special port marked "Uplink", which
    simply means _its_ transmit and receive pins are swapped, so the ADSL
    box could plug into that with a standard Ethernet cable. Once this was
    sorted out, my ADSL was live.

    The DSL-500 can be managed through a Web interface, or by a command-line
    via its serial port. Most of the normal functions are accessible through
    the Web interface. It turns out it's also possible to enable Telnet
    access to its command line, though current versions of the firmware seem
    to leave this off by default.

    Feel free to ask about anything that might be unclear.

    Lawrence "been there, done that" D'Oliveiro
     
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, Oct 26, 2003
    #20
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